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Posts Tagged ‘Soho Press’

Timothy Hallinan Inks Soho Crime Deal

Thriller novelist Timothy Hallinan has landed a book deal with Soho Press’ Soho Crime imprint. The publisher will release the three titles in the Junior Bender series in print format.

Bob Mecoy at the Creative Book Services negotiated the deal with senior editor Juliet Grames. Hallinan had already published the first two installments of this series in eBook format. Lionsgate has acquired the TV and film adaptation rights to the books.

Here’s more about Crashed, the first book in the series. It will hit bookstores on November 13th: “Junior Bender is a Los Angeles burglar with a magic touch. Since he first started breaking into houses when he was fourteen years old, he’s never once been caught. But now, after twenty-two years of an exemplary career, Junior has been blackmailed by Trey Annunziato, one of the most powerful crime bosses in LA, into acting as a private investigator on the set of Trey’s porn movie venture, which someone keeps sabotaging.”

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Explore Soho Press’ Upcoming YA Imprint

Independent publisher Soho Press will be launching a young-adult imprint called Soho Teen. Follow this link to access Soho Teen’s digital sampler.

The imprint will debut in January 2013 with a mystery title called What We Saw at Night by Jacquelyn Mitchard. The inaugural list also includes five other titles.

In an interview with blogger Cynthia Leitich Smith, editorial director Daniel Ehrenhaft explained his vision for Soho Teen. Here’s more from the interview: “We’re publishing one book a month, so that each gets the special care and attention it deserves. And while we publish a broad range of YA fiction, every story must have a mystery at its heart. That said, our titles include sci-fi, the paranormal, a dystopian, some contemporary realistic fiction (some humorous), and a star-studded anthology to benefit the literacy non-profit 826nyc. So there’s plenty of diversity!”

Janwillem van de Wetering, 1931-2008

vandewetering-headshot.jpgDutch mystery writer Janwillem van de Wetering died last Friday at his home in Maine, says Soho Press, which has published fourteen novels in his “Amsterdam Cops” series, and was just about to launch a reissue of the books later this fall. In addition to those critically acclaimed mysteries, van de Wetering also wrote a series of children’s books, nonfiction works, and short stories.

(photo: Parool)

The Ames/Davidson Literary Fight Night

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Last night, around 250 people packed Gleason’s Gym in Dumbo to watch a boxing match. Vegas it may not have been, but the roar that went up in the crowd when Jonathan “The Herring Wonder” Ames‘s name was announced in the ring certainly came close to deafening my ears. Ames, previously 1-4 in boxing bouts, had spent the last few weeks training at Gleason’s for the bout against Canadian author Craig “The Crippler” Davidson, who’d fought poet Michael Knox last fall when the Canuck edition of THE FIGHTER was released and had come to New York – fitter and leaner even since BEA – to promote the American edition published by Soho Press.

I’d expected something of a blowout on either side but the match ended up being rather close – both Ames (who attracted attention for his entourage) and Davidson landed solid blows to head and torso, though one audience member commented afterwards at the post-game drinks at Rebar that Ames’ parrying was more theatrical while Davidson landed many more counterpunches. But as to why, as Vulture correspondent Alex Littlefield wondered, “the match seemed to end in a draw,” it’s because an exhibition fight held in New York City can’t officially end with a winner or a loser as no points were counted nor were any judges on the premises. So both Ames and Davidson held up trophies, each professing that they “were glad the match was over.”

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BEA: On the Town

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As always, the convention is only part of the BEA story, with parties filling in the gaps. So as promised, reports mixed with more blurry cameraphone photos follow of some of the parties I attended over the course of the weekend.

After our our party Thursday night, Mary Reagan and I cabbed across town to 60 Thompson Street for William Morrow‘s bash, where I finally met Pittsburgh Post-Gazette book editor Bob Hoover and proceeded to gab for twenty minutes about Canada, theater and the amazing Sidney Crosby (see, you can talk about subjects other than books at BEA. In fact, it’s a necessary tonic.) After that was the Litblog Co-Op party which was even more packed than the previous two as a plethora of literary bloggers celebrated with the likes of Richard Nash, Colson Whitehead, Sara Ivry, Katharine Weber, and (though I didn’t spot him) Morgan Entrekin.

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