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Posts Tagged ‘Sonia Sotomayor’

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor to Publish Memoir

Justice Sonia Sotomayor has written a memoir titled My Beloved World. Random House’s Knopf imprint will release the book on January 15, 2013.

President Barack Obama appointed Sotomayor in 2009. Following her confirmation, she became the third female and first Hispanic to serve on the Supreme Court.

Here’s more from The Washington Post: “Sotomayor mentioned the title and the release date Friday after speaking to law students…Sotomayor told students stories about her days in law school, as a prosecutor and now as a justice. She said that many more stories about her life could be found in the book.”

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Sonia Sotomayor to Publish Memoir with Knopf

Sotomayor.jpgSupreme Court justice Sonia Sotomayor (pictured, via) will publish a memoir with Alfred A. Knopf.

Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group EIC Sonny Mehta acquired the memoir. “Hers is a triumph of the Latino experience in America,” the editor said in a statement. Literary agent and editor Peter W. Bernstein negotiated the deal. We hope the justice writes about Nancy Drew

Here’s more from the release: “Sotomayor will write about growing up in the South Bronx; her relationship with her mother and the loss of her father when she was nine years old; her inspiration as a young girl to become a lawyer; her journey to Princeton University (on a full scholarship) and later to Yale Law School; and finally, to a life in the law, culminating with her appointment to the federal bench.”

July 2009: Top Publishing Stories of the Year

26491_rushdie_salman.gifOn Bastille Day in July, author Matt Stewart published his entire novel, “The French Revolution,” on Twitter in a burst of 3,700 tweets. He later landed a book deal with Soft Skull.

At a book party, Salman Rushdie (pictured, via) told GalleyCat about his dinner with Thomas Pynchon. Amazon made headlines when they remotely deleted copies of books on Kindle e-readers.

Finally, Nancy Drew reader and federal judge Sonia Sotomayor received a 13-6 endorsement from the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Senate Confirms Perry Mason Fan

0091sesg.jpgBy a 68 to 31 vote, the Senate has confirmed Judge Sonia Sotomayor as the country’s newest Supreme Court Justice–putting a fan of the televised adventures of Perry Mason on the nation’s highest court.

Sadly, most of the articles about Sotomayor’s love for Mason focus on television episodes, rather than the work of author Erle Stanley Gardner, the Ventura, California civil rights lawyer turned pulp fiction scribe who created the series. This year the U.K. publisher House of Stratus resurrected a number of his books, including “The Case Of The Restless Redhead.” Amazon.com doesn’t list any recent American reprints of Gardner’s massive output, but perhaps the confirmation hearings will stoke readers’ interest.

Here’s more about the Sotomayor and Mason, via the NY Times: “Once sworn in, Justice Sotomayor will be the first Hispanic named to the court. And perhaps its biggest fan of the old Perry Mason shows. Fitting then that Senator Al Franken, Democrat of Minnesota, was presiding over the Senate’s vote at one point today, since he and the judge shared their fond memories of the series during her hearings.”

Nancy Drew Reader Endorsed by Senate Judiciary

sleuth1.jpg
Federal judge Sonia Sotomayor received a 13-6 endorsement from the Senate Judiciary Committee today, and according to the New York Times, her full-Senate confirmation “seems to be assured.”

In an ongoing GalleyCat investigation, we’ve wondered what Sotomayor’s affection for Nancy Drew means for a Supreme Court justice. Looking for more clues, Jezebel interviewed Chelsea Cain, author of “Confessions of a Teen Sleuth,” about girl detective’s politics.

Check it out
: “There’s no overt politics in Nancy Drew books. They’re conservative, in the sense that the status-quo must be maintained. Order must be restored. Nancy’s father — world-renown attorney Carson Drew, certainly would have voted for Hoover. But Nancy herself has a liberal bent — she is always lending a hand to orphans and the elderly — a true Roosevelt democrat.”

Supreme Court Debated

9781594202193L.jpgJudge Sonia Sotomayor has survived a grueling public confirmation hearing, but a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian debates the excessive power we grant Supreme Court justices in a new book.

Book Beast studies “Packing the Court” by James MacGregor Burns, a book revisiting the age-old argument that Supreme Court justices have unchecked power. These jurists never face an election, and Burns analyzes the history of Supreme Court partisanship.

Here’s more from the review: “[The book] is a detail-laden polemic about the perils of judicial power, which he sees as fundamentally antidemocratic because the justices are insulated from public accountability at the ballot box. It is an old, familiar argument that deserves a fresh look with the nomination of Sonia Sotomayor.”

Investigating Sonia Sotomayor’s Nancy Drew Love Affair

ND18pbcover2.jpgAs Judge Sonia Sotomayor endures her grueling U.S. Senate confirmation hearing today, GalleyCat only has one question: What did Nancy Drew teach this future Supreme Court justice?

Sotomayor once explained that her mother invested in Nancy Drew detective novels after seeing how much her daughter enjoyed reading them: “I was enamored with them. I had like two shelves of them before I turned to other reading,” she said, according to a recent Seattle Times essay by critic Misha Berson about the Supreme Court Justice and the teenage detective. The revelation generated a stream of teen detective trend pieces and headlines for Papercutz‘s Nancy Drew graphic novel series.

Here’s more from the essay: “Nancy showed us how a steel-trap mind and acute instincts are valuable, complementary tools for a girl with a big job to do. Some critics of Sotomayor’s candidacy worry that she may rely too much on empathy and intuition in Supreme Court deliberations. But, hey–it worked for Nancy!”