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Posts Tagged ‘St. Martin’s Press’

St. Martin’s Press Defends Lenore Hart Against Plagiarism Charges

St. Martin’s Press defended novelist Lenore Hart against plagiarism charges this week. A blogger who runs a Edgar Allen Poe fan website initially denounced The Raven’s Bride as “a virtual cut-and-paste job” from Cothburn O’Neal‘s 1956 novel, The Very Young Mrs. Poe.

Since then, members of the literary community (including spy novelist Jeremy Duns and Melville House co-publisher Dennis Johnson) have supported the allegations. The New York Times reported on the debate, including a statement from St. Martin’s Press in response to the accusations.

Here’s more from the statement: “Ms. Hart supplied a detailed response, which cited her research into biographical and historical sources, and explained why her novel and Cothburn O’Neal’s The Very Young Mrs. Poe contain certain details of place, description and incident. As Ms. Hart explained in her response, of course two novels about the same historical figure necessarily reliant on the same limited historical record will have similarities.”

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House of Night Series to Be Adapted

Film producer Samuel Hadida and his production company, Davis Films, have acquired the film rights for P.C. Cast and Kristen Cast‘s House of Night teen vampire series.

House of Night fans, who would you cast as the main heroine Zoey Redbird? Literary agents Sean Daily and Meredith Bernstein negotiated the deal. So far, nine books have been released in the House of Night series and the first title in the House of Night novella series, Dragon’s Oath. The mother-daughter writing duo is currently working on the tenth novel in the main series, Hidden, and the second title in the novella series, Lenobia’s Vow. The novella will be published on January 31, 2012. 

Hadida had this statement in the release: “We are thrilled to bring P.C.’s and Kristin’s stunning series of books to worldwide film audiences. They have created a world of adolescent growth against a backdrop of supernatural suspense that resonates around the world with young readers immersed in Twilight and Harry Potter. House of Night connects on a profound level — what growing up means today.”

Navy SEAL Memoir Expected to Generate Great Interest

Osama Bin Laden‘s death was carried out by a group of United States Navy SEALs called Team Six. Past member, Howard E. Wasdin, signed a book deal with St. Martin’s Press one year ago. In light of current events, the publisher is preparing for wide spread interest in the title.

On May 24th Wasdin’s memoir, SEAL Team Six: Memoirs of an Elite Navy SEAL Sniper, will be released. Publishers Weekly reports that the memoir will have full national distribution by the middle of next week.

The book was co-authored by Meio University professor Stephen Templin. According to the description, the book talks about Wasdin’s entrance into military service and a past mission concerning Somalian warlord Mohamed Farrah Aidid.

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Scottoline Moves to St. Martin’s

PW Daily reports today that after fifteen years with HarperCollins, New York Times bestselling thriller writer Lisa Scottoline has inked a four-book deal with St. Martin’s Press. Her last book with HarperCollins, LADY KILLER, will be published in February 2008. “I’m just thrilled about the group of people at St. Martin’s and the plans they have for me,” Scottoline told PW. “It’s a big change but I’m looking forward it. I think this will be an interesting, fun and exciting time. They’re very creative and dynamic people with a real esprit. I feel caught up in their enthusiasm.”

Scottoline’s new editor at St. Martin’s Press will be vp and associate publisher Jen Enderlin. “I’ll miss Carolyn Marino, who was so wonderful an editor at HarperCollins,” said Scottoline. “But I hope to have an equally wonderful relationship with Jen. She’s so enthusiastic about my writing and has new ideas for my books.”

Of Course, Why We Need A Second Sequel Is Another Story

Were you waiting with bated breath for a second sequel to Margaret Mitchell‘s iconic novel (and debut at that) GONE WITH THE WIND? Did Alexandra Ripley‘s SCARLETT heighten your anticipation sooooo much that there had to be more? Well if so, you’ll be interested in Motoko Rich‘s piece on the trials and tribulations of bringing that second sequel to print. It’s aken 12 years, three authors and one rejected manuscript, but tomorrow will be another day when RHETT BUTLER’S PEOPLE is published by St. Martin’s Press this fall. The new book, more a retelling from Rhett’s point of view, is written by Donald McCaig, a former advertising copywriter turned Virginia sheep farmer who has written well-reviewed novels about the Civil War.

When Ripley’s book did so well, a second sequel seemed a slam-dunk and St. Martin’s originally commissioned Emma Tennant to write it in 1995 with the caveat that she stay true to Mitchell’s tone, vision and characters. But her finished manuscript was rejected on the grounds it was “too British in tone”, so she was fired and legally prohibited from ever publishing her manuscript. Talks then began with Pat Conroy but his quest for editorial freedom clashed with the estate and publisher’s ideas. Four years had passed and nothing had happened until editor Hope Dellon walked into a bookstore and found one of McCaig’s novels.

Following up on a follow-up inevitably has its challenges. “I’m almost certain that there’s going to be people who really have a bone to pick with GONE WITH THE WIND who are going to take it out on this,” McCaig said. “There’s going to be adoring fans who find places where I distorted the true meaning of the original. And there’s going to be some people who think it’s a pretty good book.”

Dateline LBF: Ego-tistical

At this point, I’ve no doubt that the already overhyped proposal Ali Gunn‘s been peddling around the LBF halls will find a home on both sides of the Atlantic, but to call it, as PW Daily does, “the talk of the fair” seems to fit in with the overhype. But don’t take my word for it, see what the publishing insider Gawker‘s Emily Gould recruited to give his or her opinion on the proposal opined: “Everyone is having great fun trying to pick out who the characters are modeled after and who the writer is. Beyond that, there is absolutely nothing to care about except to wonder idly how an internationally bestselling writer and a well-known agent could have put together such a resoundingly flagrant piece of utter crap without realizing (or maybe just without caring) how crappy it actually is. Also, the sex scenes are really really terrible.”

brian-freeman.jpgPW Daily’s piece pretty much rehashes PN’s story from Monday but adds the extra tidbit that many people at LBF figure that Gunn is the agent in question co-authoring EGO and GREED along with the American male author already mentioned. If that’s the case, looking at Gunn’s client list, the only “internationally published American male writer” who might fit the criteria is Brian Freeman (right), a Minnesota-based crime writer whose debut novel IMMORAL (2005) was nominated for the Edgar Award. That and his two follow-ups, STRIPPED AND STALKED, are published by St. Martin’s Press in the US and Headline in the UK. The catch, and it’s a big enough one to sway me against this particular guess is that Freeman is “published in 46 countries and 16 languages” according to his website, and PN’s story claims the author is “published in 17 countries” but they could be mixing things up intentionally to avoid accurate guesses and Gunn having to buy the winner dinner…

Jason Pinter Moves to St. Martin’s Press

After what could be classified as a tumultuous week, former Crown books editor Jason Pinter has landed at a new home: St. Martin’s Press, where he’ll be starting duties there as an Editor on March 26. An announcement sent out by St. Martin’s Press editor-in-chief George Witte adds that Pinter will be acquiring commercial fiction – thrillers and mysteries – as well as nonfiction in pop culture and other categories. Understandably, we’re very pleased with this turn of events.

And the NBCC Awards Go To…

While NBCC Board member Rebecca Skloot liveblogged the awards, Ron and I sat through a somewhat speedy ceremony emceed by president John Freeman and highlighted by Mary Gordon‘s glowing retrospective and tribute (accompanied by retro Jill Krementz photography) to Sandrof winner John Leonard, followed by Leonard’s own words, a speech so filled with mirth, self-deprecation and reflections on present and past reviewing that I hope the transcript is made publicly available at some point. Nona Balakian winner Steven G. Kellman was a quote-a-minute, namechecking the gamut from H.L. Mencken (who had unkind words about criticism and even more scathing words about poetry – partly because of a volume he himself had written and then done everything in his power to squelch) to Lily Tomlin (“we’re all in this together – alone,” as applied to book critics, who Kellman quipped “are the only critics who can do their job in their underwear.”)

Then came the awards:

Criticism: Lawrence Weschler, EVERYTHING THAT RISES: A BOOK OF CONVERGENCES (McSweeney’s)
Poetry: Troy Jollimore, TOM THOMSON IN PURGATORY (Margie/Intuit House)
Non-Fiction: Simon Schama, ROUGH CROSSINGS: BRITAIN, SLAVES AND THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION (Ecco)
Biography: Julie Phillips
, JAMES TIPTREE, JR.: THE DOUBLE LIFE OF ALICE B. SHELDON (St. Martin’s Press)
Autobiography: Daniel Mendelsohn, THE LOST (HarperCollins)
Fiction: Kiran Desai, THE INHERITANCE OF LOSS (Atlantic Monthly Press)

It’s an award winner list of some surprise – Jollimore’s win especially surprised the poetry faithful in the audience – and some that might have seemed like a surprise, like Desai, but on further reflection are just about right. Ron’s got more about notable quotes and the afterparty, but I’m especially happy to have chatted with John Leonard about his new prize, his belief that literary blogs are “where the passion is” and finding good books to read that might be off most people’s radar. It doesn’t get much better than that.