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Posts Tagged ‘Tao Lin’

Tao Lin Responds to Former Lover’s Allegations of Plagiarism & Abuse

Tao Lin (2)A former lover has publicly accused novelist Tao Lin (pictured, via) of plagiarism and abuse. E.R. Kennedy wrote 19 posts on Twitter detailing her allegations against Lin.

In one tweet, Kennedy reveals: “Tao Lin literally copied and pasted my emails into his ‘novel.’ He took credit for my words, for my painful memories, for my story.” The novel Kennedy refers to is the 2010 publication, Richard Yates.

In response to this situation, Lin confirms that he once had a romantic relationship with Kennedy, but he denies any occurrence of plagiarism or mistreatment. According to BuzzFeed, “Lin said that Kennedy read the novel Richard Yates — which Lin said details a fictionalized version of their relationship — and Kennedy approved of it being published.” He also wrote a statement on Facebook to share his side of the story.

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Tao Lin Lands $50,000 Deal with Random House

Writer Tao Lin has landed a $50,000 deal with Vintage Books for his novel, Taipei, Taiwan. According to The New York Observer, Lin (pictured, via) will also receive an additional $10,000 bonus if the profits for his novel earn out his advance.

Lin hopes to finish the manuscript in fall 2012 and expects publication in 2013 or 2014; he intends to make it a “short” book one “could almost memorize” (between fifty and sixty thousand words). Literary agent Bill Clegg of the William Morris Endeavor negotiated the deal. Associate editor Tim O’Connell will edit the project.

In a previous interview with The New York Observer, Lin revealed: “The novel is autobiographical and begins in 2009 when the protagonist is 25. It spans ~2.5 years and is set in Taiwan, NYC, Las Vegas. It contains a marriage, somewhat extreme recreational drug usage, parents, a book tour. It’s written in a Lorrie Moore-esque prose style but denser, like my first story-collection but more refined. The protagonist in my 3rd novel experiences Siddhartha-like unhappiness and confusion.”

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The Art of the Literary Journal Trailer

Electric Literature has produced another one-sentence animation of a writer’s story, continuing to develop the art of the literary journal trailer.

This week they unveiled filmmaker Luca DiPierro‘s surreal interpretation of a sentence from Jenny Offill‘s short story, “The Tunnel”–a story featured in Electric Literature No.3. Read more about the one-sentence animations here.

DiPierro is the filmmaker behind 60 Writers/60 Places. That film featured famous writers reading in some unconventional places. Here’s more about that film: “There is Blake Butler reading in a subway, Deb Olin Unferth in a Laundromat, Jamie Gaughran-Perez in a beauty salon, Tita Chico in a dressing room, Gary Lutz at the botantical gardens, Will Eno in a park, Tao Lin next to a hot dog cart, and Rick Moody on a baseball field.”

Read Poetry, Not Blogs

5_2009_Cover-1.jpgDo personal blogs fulfill a social need that used to be satisfied by poetry?

In a recent Poetry Foundation essay, Whiting Award-winner Allison Glock argues that blog readers should turn to poems to find a more satisfying alternative to the “narcissism, vanity, [and] schadenfreude” that blogs encourage. Poet, author, and blogger Tao Lin defends blogs in his signature style, in an essay subtitled: “Blogs and the vertical integration of consciousness. Or whatever.”

Here’s more from Glock’s essay: “[Poems] endeavor to fold an entire experience, origami-like, into a few lines, getting to the bone/root/gut of the matter, the fat long ago diligently, privately boiled away. There is no waste in good poetry. (Kay Ryan.) No incomplete thoughts. (Richard Siken.) No incidental musing. (W.S. Merwin.) No cheese or bacon bits.”