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Posts Tagged ‘William Morrow’

Edward Klein Lands 2-Book Deal with William Morrow

The Amateur author Edward Klein has signed a two-book deal with HarperCollins’ William Morrow imprint.

According to CBS News, one of the books will profile the 2016 presidential nominee of the Democratic party. The other will spotlight on politicians who promote “the left-wing political agenda.”

In the past, Klein has written books about the President John F. Kennedy, former First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, secretary of state Hillary Clinton and President Barack Obama. Prior to establishing his publishing career, Klein worked in journalism. He served as an editor at both Newsweek and The New York Times Magazine.

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Neil Gaiman Announces ‘The Ocean at the End of the Lane’

Author Neil Gaiman announced the title of his new “adult-skewing” book via Twitter. The Ocean at the End of the Lane will be released in summer 2013.

According to Entertainment Weekly, 2013 will be a busy year for Gaiman. He will also be publishing a picture book called Chu’s Day due out on January 8, 2013. A second Chu book has already been written, but no release date has been revealed. Follow this link to check out some of Adam Rex‘s illustrations from the book.

William Morrow, an imprint of HarperCollins, confirmed the news on their own Twitter page.

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Courtney Love Lands Book Deal for Memoir

Controversial rock star Courtney Love has landed a deal with HarperCollins’ William Morrow imprint for a “tell-all” memoir. The music video embedded above features Love singing with her band, Hole.

Love will collaborate with writer Anthony Bozza on this project. In the past, Bozza has co-authored books with musical artists Tommy Lee, Slash and INXS. Deputy publisher Lynn Grady negotiated the deal with literary agent David Vigliano.

Here’s more from the release: “Although Love is often associated with deceased husband, music legend and front man of Nirvana, Kurt Cobain, she has had an incredible artistic career of her own crisscrossing into music, film, popular culture, and fashion…The as yet untitled memoir will offer a no-holds-barred look into Love’s life from childhood to the present day.”

Atria Picks Up Durand As Senior Editor

sarah-durand-headshot.jpgAfter a decade working her way up the editorial ladder at William Morrow, Sarah Durand is relocating to Simon & Schuster‘s Atria Books imprint after the Labor Day weekend, retaining her current title of senior editor.

Durand’s recent portfolio of acquisitions for the Morrow, Avon, and Harper imprints ranges a memoir from the wife of the lead singer for Stone Temple Pilots and an etiquette guide for Goths to a tour of the world’s Jewish communities (“from Rangoon to Havana and from Tehran to the hills of Uganda,” according to the deal announcement). Her track record is most clearly established, however, in the acquisition of mysteries and thrillers. Either way, she looks to be a good fit with Atria’s existing areas of focus.

(photo: Gawker/N. Tamindzic)

Kathleen E. Woodiwiss Dies at 68

PW Daily reports that Kathleen E. Woodiwiss, who is credited with inventing the modern historical romance novel, died Saturday at Fairview Northland Regional Hospital in Princeton after a long illness. She was 68. When her debut novel THE FLAME AND THE FLOWER was published in 1972, the romance world had not seen anything like it before. It sold over 2.3 million copies in its first four years of publication and her eleven subsequent novels, including THE WOLF AND THE DOVE (1974) SHANNA (1977) and THE RELUCTANT SUITOR (2002) have all been successful to varying bestselling degrees, with over 36 million total copies in print. Woodiwiss’s final novel, EVERLASTING, will be published by William Morrow in hardcover this October.


Funeral services will be held
at 11:30 A.M. on Wednesday, July 11th at the Church of The Open Door in Maple Grove. A visitation will be held 1 hour prior to the service at the church and also from 5:00 – 8:00 P.M. on Tuesday, July 10th at Strike Funeral Home – Cambridge Chapel.

Random House Revolving Door Widens Editorial and Marketing/Distribution Dichotomy

Last week’s post about Daniel Menaker‘s exit and the larger implications for Random House served as unwitting inspiration for Sara Nelson‘s column in this week’s issue of Publishers Weekly. After recapping what she terms (and I concur is) a “stunning” number of job switcheroos at Random House, Nelson wonders if all the gossip and chatter misses the overall point: that none of the departing RH executives, going back to Don Weisberg, the COO of RH North America who left in February, were replaced with external hires:

That…suggests that Random is indeed shifting focus, but not necessarily in fiction. At worst, the piling on of new jobs to longtime staffers with already full plates is a form of downsizing; at best, it might be that Random, like most publishers, will soon move its emphasis from the acquiring/editing side of the business to the less sexy but increasingly important distribution and marketing side. Editors and authors will always matter-somebody, after all, has to create all that “content” that will be disseminated in forms perhaps not yet invented—but the focus these days is more on selling direct, on digital “product” and on POD.

Nelson’s larger point is a good one, but I suspect that emphasis already began quite a number of years ago, and not just at Random House. Most of those at the executive level – and by that I mean Publisher, CEO or something in between – tend to come up from the marketing, distribution and publicity sides, and yet if a new imprint is formed, it’s usually named after its founding editor (most recent examples: Spiegel & Grau at Doubleday/Broadway; Amy Einhorn Books at Putnam. At least Twelve, Jonathan Karp‘s imprint at Grand Central Publishing, was never going to be named after him.) Eponymous editorial imprints seem to follow a common trajectory: a big announcement spurring a flurry of news, commentary and speculation; an 18 month or so gestation marked by sprees of acquiring not out of place at 5th Avenue department stores; and after a few years – best personified by the fate of Rob Weisbach‘s imprint at William Morrow in the late 1990s – a near-permanent place in the loss-leading category for the publisher. Never mind the irony that the most successful eponymous imprint, ReganBooks, is no more, shuttered in favor of the more anonymous (and temporary) “HC” logo.

So if, as Nelson concludes, publishing houses’ energies are moving even more strongly towards the “less sexy” side of publishing, perhaps it may make sense to question the wisdom of imprints named after editors – especially when in the end – with the exception of one Ms. Judith Regan – they are just as anonymous to readers as are the marketing & distribution people. In other words (and keeping the elemental theme going) maybe it’s not a question of air or water but earth and fire.

BEA: On the Town

powerhouse.jpg

As always, the convention is only part of the BEA story, with parties filling in the gaps. So as promised, reports mixed with more blurry cameraphone photos follow of some of the parties I attended over the course of the weekend.

After our our party Thursday night, Mary Reagan and I cabbed across town to 60 Thompson Street for William Morrow‘s bash, where I finally met Pittsburgh Post-Gazette book editor Bob Hoover and proceeded to gab for twenty minutes about Canada, theater and the amazing Sidney Crosby (see, you can talk about subjects other than books at BEA. In fact, it’s a necessary tonic.) After that was the Litblog Co-Op party which was even more packed than the previous two as a plethora of literary bloggers celebrated with the likes of Richard Nash, Colson Whitehead, Sara Ivry, Katharine Weber, and (though I didn’t spot him) Morgan Entrekin.

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The Philosopher-King Wants a Light Read

In today’s NYT op-ed section, Stanley Fish browses the mystery section*, and we learn that the greatest minds in America face the same problems buying a book you do: The jacket copy’s unreliable, the blurbs even more so, but first sentences will almost always steer you right.

Among the books he dismisses on the basis of bad (for him) openings are Rain Fall by Barry Eisler and Roses Are Red by James Patterson; what he likes is Elizabeth George‘s What Came Before He Shot Her. (Contacted for a response, Eisler wrote back to say that he enjoyed Fish’s article: “Look, no one’s work appeals to everyone. Stanley just didn’t like that (misquoted) sentence; that happens, and it would be silly for me to hold it against him. He sounds like a thoughtful guy.”) Anybody got a lead on where the sentence “Stromose was in high school when he met the boy who would someday murder his wife and son” comes from? Google was singularly unhelpful not only for the exact phrase, but for all sorts of words searched for in conjunction with “Stromose,” which you’d have thought would make things easier…

UPDATE: Sarah double-checked and the mystery opening line belongs to T. Jefferson Parker‘s STORM RUNNERS, just out from William Morrow. “Stromose” is actually misspelled; it should be “Stromsoe,” who is the protagonist of Parker’s book.

*It’s TimesSelect, so you might not be able to read it all.