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Posts Tagged ‘Xiaolu Guo’

PEN American Center Kicks Off Fall Event Series

penamericaPEN American Center has kicked off its Fall events series, a lineup of discussions featuring writers, musicians and critics around New York City.

The first night, which took place this past Tuesday, was called ”What Can’t Be Sung” and featured a discussion between The New Yorker‘s music writer Sasha Frere-Jones, Chinese author/filmmaker Xiaolu Guo and the singer-songwriter Nellie McKay.

The next event in the series, “Something to Hide: Writers Against the Surveillance State,” will take place at the Brooklyn Book Festival. The PEN DIY Series, which “celebrates how literature can be approachable yet unexpected, and how it can help us make sense of our lives,” will take place at the Ace Hotel once a month throughout the fall.

Follow this link to see the schedule for the series and read more about the other events.

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Chinese Lit Has Its Day

The Telegraph’s Helen Brown ponders the recent boom in Chinese literature, one that has only grown since Jung Chang‘s family memoir WILD SWANS hit and stayed on UK bestseller lists fifteen years ago. Last year, Xiaolu Guo‘s A CONCISE CHINESE-ENGLISH DICTIONARY FOR LOVERS was shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction. And Yan Lianke‘s subversive SERVE THE PEOPLE! is poised to become one of this year’s late-summer hits.

Part of that reason is the mock “banned in China” sticker on the cover, but Toby Eady, the literary agent who worked for seven years to get Jung Chang on to our shelves, now a consultant for Picador on Asian fiction, counters: “Very little is banned in China any more. There used to be Yellow Books and Blue Books: yellow for sex, blue for politics. We used to go out and talk to police chiefs about what was banned. But that doesn’t happen in the same way now. Not with the sex books. More with the political ones.” Eady then goes on to describe what happened at the Beijing Book Fair. “Two years ago,” he goes on, “English publishers went to the Beijing book fair for the first time. They bought blind without translators lined up. It was a piece of PR or corporate politics. A few years ago I was asked to speak to most of the major publishers about China and I said they had to respect its culture – publish quality in good translation, not tone-deaf translation. Next year there will be a lot published.”

Orange Broadband Prize Shortlist

The Orange Broadband Prize has whittled its longlist down to a mere half-dozen names:

Half of a Yellow Sun, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Arlington Park, Rachel Cusk
The Inheritance of Loss, Kiran Desai
A Concise Chinese-English Dictionary for Lovers, Xiaolu Guo
The Observations, Jane Harris
Digging to America by Anne Tyler

“The 2007 Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction shortlist is incredibly exciting,” commented Muriel Gray, Chair of judges. “It represents six beautifully crafted pieces of work that are as accessible as they are fascinating. That this outstanding writing should come from such diverse sources that includes five different nationalities, a world famous author, as well as a first-time novelist, is doubly thrilling.” The overall winner will be announced on June 6.