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Public Affairs

7-Year-Old Skewers LEGO For Not Including More Girls

LEGO_LogoRemember when LEGO came under fire for its LEGO Friends line, a collection geared toward girls (finally!), but which abandoned adventurous themes for a pastel color palate, taller and slimmer female minifigures, and cliche female-friendly scenarios like a suburban home, a beauty parlor and a horse stable? Well, despite the toy line being slammed as sexist and pandering (even spawning a hashtag movement to #LiberateLEGO), it has become a huge success.

But not all little girls are satisfied with the domestic-themed options the toy company offers them, and one little girl in particular has decided to make her very dissatisfied voice heard.

Seven-year-old Charlotte took it upon herself to write a strongly-worded letter to LEGO, criticizing the toy company for making more “boy people” than “lego girls,” and for sending boys on fantastic adventures while relegating girls to the mall and the beauty parlor.

The letter read in part:

“My name is Charlotte. I am 7 years old and I have LEGOs, but I don’t like that there are more LEGO boy people and barely any LEGO girls. Today I went to a store and saw LEGOs in two sections…All the girls did was sit at home, go to the beach, and shop, and they had no jobs, but the boys went on adventures, worked, saved people, and had jobs, even swam with sharks. I want you to make more LEGO girl people and let them go on adventures and have fun OK?!?”

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Does Detroit Need PR More Than Ever?

hello_from_detroitThe housing market? Dead. The automobile market? Bailed out. More than 680,000 resident? And dropping fast. The mayor? In prison. The planet’s most popular rapper from this place? Off the market (again). The city? Legally bankrupt.

This is your Detroit, America, and it is about to close shop and file Chapter 9 protection, becoming the largest U.S. city to accomplish such a feat. Bravo?

Thanks to Judge Steven W. Rhodes, Detroit has been ruled insolvent — broke as hell, in layman’s terms — because the 18th largest U.S. city can’t pay its debts, as in an ironic $18 billion. Public pensions will be reduced. Some debt will be paid off … eventually. Essential city services will be restored to (and this is a quote from the Judge) “tolerable.”

That’s the hope and prayer that has befallen this once great city. Question: Is this a job for PR?

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U.S. Army Col. Lynette Arnhart: ‘Use Average-Looking Women’ for PR

say whatBe … all that you can be. In the Ar-r-r-my.”

When it comes to public relations, that famous slogan only applies to women who are a whole lot of ugly—at least according to U.S. Army Colonel Lynette Arnhart and her embarrassing internal email, which leaked all over Politico yesterday.

Col. Arnhart thinks pretty women with fresh makeup on deployment aren’t portraying a proper image for a national communications strategy. This internal email was sent to two people, one of which determined the email would be best served if sent to everyone in his network. That guy is Col. Christian Kubik, chief of public affairs for the Army’s Training and Doctrine Command.

The forwarded email (below, and verbatim for those scoring at home) was preceded by a personal note of his own: “A valuable reminder from the experts who are studying gender integration — when [public affairs officers] choose photos that glamorize women (such as in the attached article), we undermine our own efforts. Please use ‘real’ photos that are typical, not exceptional.”

The email that incited this response after the jump

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Bay Area Changes In The Years Following The Events That Inspired The Film “Fruitvale Station”

Earlier this week, I had the chance to see an advanced screening of the film Fruitvale Station, a dramatic telling of the real-life events that led to the fatal shooting of 22-year-old Oscar Grant by police officers shortly after the San Francisco Bay area rang in the New Year in 2009. Powerful and devastating, a quick scan of the theater lobby after the movie finished clearly demonstrated the effect it had on viewers. It was a sea of puffy eyes and balled up tissues.

Director Ryan Coogler, himself a 26-year-old from the East Bay area, does a masterful job of showing you that while not perfect (the film notes that Grant spent time in prison, for instance), he was a man looking optimistically to the future whose life was senselessly cut short. You’d have to be heartless to walk away from the movie without having six different kinds of feelings, all of them leading to at least one shed tear.

So enough gushing about the film… Well one more: See it! It’s great! And your whole summer movie-going itinerary can’t be popcorn movies. Really, pass on The Lone Ranger, which looks terrible, and watch this instead. I got the idea from a screening buddy to take a look and see how Bay Area police and other groups have responded to the incident in the years since.

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Cities Worldwide Address Urban Issues Using Digital Technology

New Yorkers have often heard about Mayor Michael Bloomberg traveling domestically and overseas to meet with city leaders to compare notes on urban innovation projects. On Monday during the first day of Internet Week, representatives from a dozen cities around the globe, including New York, convened on the Mayor’s home turf.

The officials appeared at the symposium to describe their initiatives for improving their residents’ lives using digital technology. These represent quality of life and business issues rather than the most pressing urban problems. Each speaker was allotted only ninety seconds, so here’s a brief snapshot:

New York City: Last year the Big Apple launched its Made in NY website to promote local entrepreneurship. Since then they’ve expanded the effort with increased access to workspaces, partnerships with academic institutions as well as other programs and competitions to assist startups.

Boston: launched its Street Bump app, a citizen enabled sensing device for potholes. This project was introduced following extensive road construction, including the Big Dig tunnel project that lasted several years and took its toll on locals’ automobiles.

Philadelphia: The PHL program is a social enterprise partnership with funding from Michael Bloomberg. The civic challenge asks entrepreneurs to identify, select and pilot new programs that solve a host of local issues.

Chicago: Mayor Emmanuel’s ‘Broadband Challenge’ is aimed at improving the city’s fiber network by offering free wi-fi and low cost connectivity. The process even involved updating the sewer network infrastructure.

Quebec City: The Canadian city has its own social network and also has the capability for residents to send personal text messages to help with snow removal. That way they don’t ended up stranded in their cars during snowstorms.

Ottawa: The Canadian city encourages citizen engagement and government transparency. Through an open source website, the public has access to all data. The Apps4 Ottawa open data contest rewards developers who create the most valuable uses and visualizations of the open source data.

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NYC Faces Backlash for PSAs ‘Shaming’ Teen Parents

We think you’ll agree that everyone wants to reduce teen pregnancy rates. But some citizens and advocacy organizations aren’t too happy with New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg‘s Human Resources Administration‘s latest attempt to dissuade teens from becoming parents with a bold new PSA campaign that seems to leverage the power of shame.

The campaign consists of posters like the one to the left that pair photos of distraught infants with harrowing facts like “90% of teen parents don’t marry each other”. Each poster encourages viewers to text HRA to learn more and offers “games” that allow users to follow pregnant teenage couples and answer questions like “my GF is pregnant! Prom is coming up and she’s not going, should I stay in or go to prom? Reply ‘promyes’ or ‘promno’”. It’s a sort of Choose-Your-Own-Adventure for the at-risk teenage set. User engagement, calls to action–seems like it could make for effective advocacy PR.

Planned Parenthood is not amused, however.

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FEMA Needs Some Help With Its Newest PR Campaign

FEMA Note to ambitious PR firms with experience developing PSAs “designed to inspire change”: This week The Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, let everyone know that it would like a little help creating campaigns that actually serve the public instead of passing into the digital ether unnoticed like so many white-bread press releases.

The problem stems from the fact that the agency’s current campaign, with the super-creative name “Ready“, just doesn’t have the right amount of zip, or zing, or pizazz that the public demands of its government relations initiatives! It’s also a little scary!

FEMA specifically wants a firm experienced in pushing the message via social media; we have to say we’re a little impressed by the agency’s extensive multimedia Facebook page and Al Roker‘s willingness to make fun of himself for the public good. The winning bidder, which “must be adept at managing communications across interactive websites, social media, blogging, texting, gaming, grass roots marketing, social experimenting and other means”, could receive as many as four year-long contracts with the agency.

Do you think you have what it takes to remind the public that FEMA is actually a very useful organization, not a One World Government cabal best judged on the PR disaster that was Hurricane Katrina? Submit your questions and ideas by next Tuesday!

Are PR ‘Press Trips’ and Events Things of the Past?

The BeatlesToday we came across a very interesting post from PSFK founder Piers Fawkes, who believes that PR firms need to abandon the concept of the “press trip”. Why? Because the practice of paying for reporters to travel in the hopes that they will offer positive coverage of a client is no longer sustainable–and Fawkes writes that “public relations executives are impeding media by failing to understand” that the modern digital newsroom requires journalists to publish every day instead of chasing stories about clients.

We have a few questions, the first of which is: Why haven’t we been invited on press trips? (Just kidding.) Seriously, though: How often does your firm send reporters on trips? Is the investment worth the return? Should PR teams stop expecting the media to come to them and start knocking on more doors? Will the press conference itself become irrelevant?

 

PRSA Defends Industry in LAX PR Contract Dispute

Los Angeles International AirportLast week brought news of some significant challenges within the Los Angeles wing of the public relations world–and industry groups have begun to take sides.

Los Angeles World Airports, a group that owns and operates three major transport hubs including Los Angeles International/LAX, recently awarded approximately $4 million in contracts to Southern California PR/media firms charged with highlighting the LAX’s ongoing modernization efforts and promoting Los Angeles as a tourist destination. Last week, two politically ambitious members of the city council questioned the value of the investment and demanded a review by the full council (which has the power to overturn contracts awarded by city organizations).

Their issue? The contracts were “awarded without discussion by the Board of Airport Commissioners last week to companies that are not based in Los Angeles”. Of course the firms in question aren’t particularly happy about the possibility that they could lose these crucial contracts.

The Public Relations Society of America‘s Los Angeles chapter made its position clear over the weekend by stepping into the fray and writing a letter to the city council officially supporting the three firms involved–and the PR business at large.

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The Dream Is Over: San Francisco Bans Public Nudity

Photo via Associated Press This week in Local Government Relations: The times, they are a’ changin’–or are they? Just as the Seattle Police Department learned to love its citizens’ newfound embrace of a certain forbidden substance, the City of San Francisco‘s Board of Supervisors made an effort to curb the endless love-in by banning public nudity via a razor-thin 5-4 vote.

Has the decision divided Bay Area residents? Of course it has. Did dozens of advocates immediately stop in their tracks and strip down in protest? Of course they did.

As we learn more, we’re a little surprised by the depth of the City of Love’s long-term “live and let live” relationship with those who have no problem letting it all hang out. According to various reports, city dwellers will no longer have the right to “[lounge] nude in the city’s plazas, [parade] up and down city streets sans pants, or [ride] subways and buses bare-bottomed”. Wait, you mean they could do that before?!?! Apparently Rice-a-Roni wasn’t the only San Francisco treat!

City Supervisor Scott Weiner (tee hee) introduced the ordinance in what seemed like an attempt to counter complaints from local business owners about a surge in “habitual nudists” flaunting their flesh in the city’s infamous Castro district–but he noted, to opponents’ surprise, that “The dominant demographic expressing concern is gay men”. Based on the close vote and the immediate public outcry, we’d say the city has a bit of a public relations problem on its hands–and we anticipate weeks of futile protests punctuated by gratuitous flashing sprees.

Public nudity remains legal in the state of California as long as it isn’t deemed “lewd or offensive”, though we’d say that wording allows for a bit of a slippery slope…and we wonder how the act of dropping one’s drawers constitutes “free speech”. The fact that “…preschoolers can still go bare, women can still go topless and public nudity will continue to be allowed at events permitted by the city” also diminishes the power of the protesters’ point, doesn’t it?

A final note to the City of New York and the MTA: thank you for not letting people ride the train nude. Improv Everywhere‘s “No Pants Subway Ride” already shows us more than enough skin. Read more

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