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Research

STUDY: Readers Remember Print Placements Better Than Digital

like ugh right

A common challenge we’ve heard discussed among our PR contacts with “old-school” clients involves convincing them that placements on specialty blogs can be just as valuable (in terms of dollars and cents) as a mention in the Wall Street Journal.

No, you can’t hang them on your wall — but they can be even more important in terms of raising awareness of the client’s business.

A new study from the University of Houston does sort of throw a wrench into that line of thinking, though: it found that readers are more likely to remember things like, say, your client’s name and the products they sell when this information appears in print.

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Vast Majority of Firms Still Use AVE for Measurement

percentagesWe hope everyone’s taken something valuable from this year’s Measurement Week event so far.

In case you missed it, last week Peter Himler of Flatiron Communications and Rebekah Iliff of AirPR gave us their takes on the future of measurement, and yesterday our own Nancy Lazarus brought you 10 pointers from Monday’s event with Heidi Sullivan of Cision Vocus, Shonali Burke of Shonali Burke Consulting, Chris Penn of Shift Communications and Sharam Fouladger-Mercer of AirPR.

Here’s our favorite quote from Rebekah:

“We should not, would not, could not use the Advertising Value Equivalency (AVEs) to measure the value of earned media. Most PR pros I know have done away with this, but according to a Ragan’s study last year, nearly a third of PR/communications practitioners still use them. Ugh.”

This morning, we came across a post on the This Is PRable blog indicating that the problem is worse than that.

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STUDY: Media Coverage Has Little Influence on Consumers’ Travel Decisions

If only I'd read this BEFORE I bought tickets

Here’s an interesting, somewhat contradictory finding from our friends at travel blog Skift.

Turns out that media coverage of a given destination wields little, if any, influence when it comes to determining where consumers will take their next vacations.

If true, this finding might require some travel/leisure-focused firms to adjust their strategies…

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A Day in the Life of a Marketer: Long Hours, No Lunch, Dashed Dreams of Being an ‘Artist’

Oh good, it’s not just me.

According to a new survey conducted by AtTask in partnership with MarketingProfs, life is hard for modern day marketers and public relations professionals.

Here’s the breakdown: we work long hours (the survey found that nearly one in four of us works 10 or more on an average day); we’re slaves to our inbox (3 to 4 hours each day on email); we routinely skip lunch breaks (56 percent of us eat at our desks).

Despite all this, we still feel like we can’t get anything done. Case in point:

“An astounding 40 percent of marketers blame manual tasks, unexpected projects and rework as primary sources of lost productivity.”

Sadder still, one in three of us still dreams of a career in the arts while another 16 percent are scheming to transition into a more left-brained field like business, law or engineering.

Does this all sound like the conversation you just had with your next-door office mate?

It’s deja vu all over again.

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AT&T’s ‘It Can Wait’: Even Admirable Campaigns Can’t Wait to Succeed

att-it-can-wait

Back in my fare burg of Dallas lives the telecom behemoth known as AT&T. One of its largest undertakings was the PSA campaign for It Can Wait. The clarion call for no texting and driving was a necessary one — and one AT&T put few limits on spreading.

It started in September 2009, and five years later, it is still being heralded as one of the country’s best campaigns. Only one problem: No one that should care does.

Awards. Awareness. Accolades. They don’t really matter without any action.

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STUDY: Bloggers Now Outnumber Traditional Journalists

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Those who make the PR industry run don’t just hear a lot about how dramatically the media is changing — they see it every day.

That said, it’s always interesting to view those observations quantified in data form.

The most recent media survey conducted by our friends at Business Wire shows us, in charts and graphs and numbers drawn from interviews with 300 North American journalists, how “newsrooms” around the country have changed. In fact, more writers now work for blogs like the one you’re currently reading than for more traditional media outlets.

More on that after the jump.

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STUDY: Social Media Is Winning PR War for Anti-Fracking Groups

Signs protesting the process of hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, are seen near the town of Calicoon Center, New YorkWe’ve written frequently about the PR war over hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” — anti-fracking and environmental groups VS. the energy companies that have adopted the controversial practice. Now, a recent study by Makovsky suggests that while both sides may be impassioned and dedicated to winning the debate, the war is being fought on two different battle grounds, and the side utilizing social media appears to be the side that’s winning.

The survey revealed that 57% of U.S. consumers believe that fracking is one of the three most important environmental issues today. Furthermore, 65% of respondents (71% in fracking cities) say they hear about the issue at least weekly, and 77% say they hear about it primarily from internet news sites and social media.

Now here’s the kicker: the study also found that the vast majority of social media mentions of the subject are coming from anti-fracking activists and groups. In fact, of the 1.3 million Twitter mentions of fracking from January through July 2014, anti-fracking activists generated 2000% more impressions than groups supportive of the practice. Let us spell that out again… two-thousand percent! Read more

PR Specialists Trump Journalists in Number and Average Salary

FT_Salary_GapCongratulations are in order to every journo-turned-PR specialist. According to the latest report from the PewResearch Center, you’re now making nearly $20K more per year than you would if you hadn’t sold your soul to the dark art of public relations.

If the numbers stay on track, that gap will continue to grow.

Consider the chart to the right: In 2004, for every $1 a PR specialist made, a reporter made 71¢. Fast forward nine years and the number is 65¢—that’s a 6¢ loss.

It gets better (or worse, depending on your vantage point).

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How the Music Industry Brainwashes Us to Like Songs We (Rightfully) Hate

dd914540-a3ff-11e3-8aeb-b5427b31fc45_Iggy-Azalea-Fancy-PollThe first time I heard Iggy Azalea’s “Fancy,” I loathed it, like wouldn’t-get-through-30-seconds-before-I-changed-the-station loathed it. But here I am in August, a few months after the song’s release, and I find that while I still truly do not enjoy the song, my resolve to burn it out of my mind and all existence has weakened, and I no longer feel the overwhelming need to leap out a third-story window if it suddenly comes on while out with friends.

As it turns out, there’s a real, neurological reason for my surrender, and it’s one the music industry uses to its full advantage — think of it like Stockholm Syndrome, but auditory — and the kidnapper with whom you slowly grow to sympathize is Katy Perry’s latest auto-tuned nightmare.

The phenomenon was revealed in an fMRI study, which suggested that repeated exposure to a song is actually a more effective means of winning the hearts of the public than writing a song that they might actually like. This is because the emotional centers of the brain are more active when a person hears a song he or she has heard previously than when hearing an unfamiliar song that better suits the person’s musical taste. It seems our brains confuse the ability to recognize and remember a song with actually enjoying it. Read more

Get Ready for More Entry-Level Jobs (Some Experience Required)

HELLOIAMNEW

Last week, Laurent Lawrence of the PRSA wrote an op-ed on the reasons behind PR’s big turnover problem. One of the issues he addressed was “nonexistent onboarding”, or managers who hire entry-level employees and expect them to manage accounts, like, yesterday.

In an unrelated story this April, Richard Edelman responded to an inflammatory Financial Times piece by admitting that too many firms “dump” their media relations work on the very same newbies. Sorry, guys.

Yet a report published late yesterday in The Wall Street Journal tells us to expect an increase in entry-level PR jobs over the next few years. Here’s the thing: those jobs will require more experience and more refined skill sets than they did in the past.

As the WSJ’s Lauren Weber says in the video after the jump, “internships are the new entry-level jobs.”

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