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Posts Tagged ‘Advertising Research Foundation’

10 Trends in Marketing to Latinos

The Republican Party isn’t the only organization with a growing interest in the Hispanic market. Most companies have intensified their focus on this increasingly influential segment, ranging from early adopter brands to those now playing catch-up. The Advertising Research Foundation spotlighted this hot topic by hosting multiple Hispanic market panels at their Re:think conference this week in New York.

As Ramon Pineda, SVP and general manager at Univision said, “The U.S. Hispanic market is in our backyard and you don’t have to travel to sell it. There are no issues with tariffs, imports or other regulations” that one encounters overseas. He cited the following stats and trends:

1. Population growth: The U.S. Hispanic population has grown from 9.1 million in 1970 to 54.6 million now, increasing from less than 5% of the U.S. population to 17% in that timeframe.

2. More barometers now measure Hispanic influence: , Pineda said, “In order for the Hispanic market to be perceived as valuable we needed empirical data, otherwise it was as if we didn’t exist”. Hispanic spending power in the U.S. has increased from less than $500 billion in 2000 to $1.2 trillion in 2012.

3. Expansion beyond the usual cities: The biggest U.S. Hispanic markets are intuitive, namely Los Angeles, New York, Miami and parts of Texas and Arizona. Now other cities are also notable, including Seattle, Denver, Minneapolis, Raleigh and Detroit (the singer Rodriguez’s hometown). Suburbanization is also becoming more prevalent.

4. Not a homogenous market: Pineda cautioned that the U.S. Hispanic market isn’t one-dimensional. Latinos come from a variety of countries and income groups.

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Coca-Cola Says Social Media Buzz Does Not Boost Sales

Coca-Cola This week, a Coca-Cola representative made a statement that will create more than a few headaches in marketing, PR and advertising departments around the country. For all the talk of encouraging the conversation online, social media buzz does not appear to translate into short-term revenue gains (at least for Coke). Oh, and print ads are the most effective way for Coke to drive per-impression sales. Surprised?

It’s a very dramatic announcement coming from a company with more than 60 million Facebook fans. But don’t freak out just yet–and don’t start gently lowering clients’ expectations, either. According to AdAge, Coke’s senior manager of marketing strategy Eric Schmidt (no relation) warned his audience at the Advertising Research Foundation‘s Re:Think 2013 conference not to read too much into the bombshell headline.

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Offline Conversations Still Carry Weight in the Digital Age

Despite the “social wave rolling across the U.S. and the world,” offline conversations, especially those happening face-to-face, still dominate. So says Ed Keller, CEO of word-of-mouth research firm and consultancy Keller Fay Group and co-author of The Face-to-Face Book. Keller spoke about this pattern during the ARF/Advertising Research Foundation’s Audience Measurement 7.0 conference on Tuesday in New York. He also emphasized that contrary to conventional wisdom, offline and online conversations are not really mirrors of each other.

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Creative Work Ideas Come From Unlikely Sources

While creativity has long been a mystery, lately researchers have been unlocking keys to the creative process and dispelling some common myths. Jonah Lehrer, Wired contributing editor and author of Imagine: How Creativity Works shared findings about personal creativity and group collaboration during a presentation at the Advertising Research Foundation‘s (ARF) Re:think conference on Monday in New York.

Public relations ranks as the top creative services job in U.S. News’ recent report, underscoring its creative component. So understanding the secrets of creativity can be valuable the next time you’re asked to come up with a big idea. As it turns out, daydreaming, diversions, and random conversations all play a role.

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Research Shows Positive Word of Mouth Far Outweighs Negative

With the buzz surrounding word-of-mouth marketing on the rise, there has been a greater effort to track and analyze this phenomenon. At the ARF/Advertising Research Foundation’s Measurement 6.0 conference in New York on Monday, word-of-mouth research was high on the agenda.

Evaluating and quantifying the dynamics of consumer conversations was the topic of a joint study conducted and presented by Ed Keller, CEO of Keller Fay Group and Emily Vanides, VP connections research and analytics at MediaVest.

Their research was based on Keller Fay’s TalkTrack methodology that measures conversations online and offline. Using a diary-based survey program, respondents kept track of their conversations and later reported them in an online survey. Some of the findings were quite surprising.

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Biometrics, Social Media Among the Latest Research Trends

L to R: Ted McConnell, ARF; Lee Brown, Groupon; and Naveen Selvadurai, foursquare. Photo: Nancy Lazarus

Social media’s growing role in research was a visible theme throughout the ARF/Advertising Research Foundation’s Re:think conference in New York this week, from the topics of the keynote speakers and breakout sessions to the trade show exhibitors specialized in social media monitoring.

Another area generating buzz was biometrics, research that measures emotional responses driving behavior. Much discussion also focused on the size and use of social network databases. After the jump are the key takeaways.

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