AgencySpy LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy FishbowlNY FishbowlDC GalleyCat SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘Advertising Week’

Perez Hilton, Other Famous People Had Thoughts on Advertising Week

Seeing Perez Hilton at Advertising Week is kind of like seeing Kid Rock at Cannes or the Kardashians at Paris Fashion Week: you get why they’re hanging around, but you wonder who invited them.

Nonetheless, quite a few names-you-might-know showed up at a red carpet event sponsored by social networking service Keek and agreed to talk for a few seconds about the state of things.

Here’s Mashable founder Pete Cashmore on management:

Perez and more after the jump…

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Mediabistro Job Fair

Mediabistro Job FairLand your next big gig! Join us on January 27 at the Altman Building in New York City for an incredible opportunity to meet with hiring managers from the top New York media companies, network with other professionals and industry leaders, and land your next job. Register now!

4 Takes on Facebook’s ‘New’ Paid Media Platform

Fbook coffee

This year’s Advertising Week has already involved plenty of high-profile speakers and events that we were unable to attend. But one of the biggest announcements concerned Facebook and the relaunch of its cookie-free paid content placement platform, Atlas.

This doesn’t just concern ad agencies — it’s a big deal to anyone working in paid media. In short, it will supposedly help marketers better prove the ROI of their clients’ social media investments.

We asked our contacts in the marketing world for their takes on what the new development means to the marketing industry at large.

Adam Miller, social media specialist at Walker Sands Communications:

“Facebook’s relaunch of Atlas stresses the importance of tying digital marketing efforts and social media marketing together. Facebook is restoring an old Microsoft initiative after acquiring it 16 months ago. The relaunch was meant to help marketers serve ads based on demographics rather than cookies. As consumers use a variety of devices to surf the internet and learn about different companies, Atlas gives agencies with integrated marketing programs the opportunity to better target their audience without the limits of cookies.

Read more

Ellen Broke a Record with Samsung, Breaks Hearts with her iPhone

Ellen Selfie

At 2 million retweets and counting. How many iPhones is that anyway, Samsung?

In case you were asleep like half the viewing audience, this picture was taken by Ellen DeGeneres in the audience — a selfie tweeted ’round the world. As covered by our Tonya Garcia, it was a record-breaking picture eclipsing the shot taken of President Obama getting handsy with the First Lady.

Good times, right? Not if you are Samsung.

You see, if you have the Oscars on the DVR, rewind it to the historic selfie and you will see a clear positioning of product placement for Android phone manufacturer, Samsung. Of course, no one cared one bit that it was a Samsung phone because they were too busy gawking at the beautiful people. However, Samsung paid some nice coin for that advertisement.

And then Ellen had to do this…

Read more

9 Pointers for Building Branded Blogs

Gear Patrol Super Gear Featured Image The theme “If you build it, they will come” worked magically in the baseball movie Field of Dreams, but in the crowded blogosphere, only a fraction break through to the big leagues of major media brands. While The Huffington Post, Bleacher Report and Vice are well-known examples, many other blogs succeed on a smaller scale.

A “super bloggers” panel convened at Advertising Week in New York on Thursday, sharing their perspectives on editorial content and sponsored posts with moderator Manoush Zomorodi , host of WNYC’s New Tech City radio show. They included Ben Bowers, founder of Gear Patrol, Julie Carlson, editor-in-chief of Remodelista, Emily Schuman, founder and editor of Cupcakes and Cashmere, and Joy Wilson, founder of Joy the Baker.

While their blogs cover consumer categories like home design, baking, fashion and gadgets, their approaches also apply on the corporate side. Some areas below serve as reminders, while other issues like sponsored content are more recent.

Read more

12 Ways for Seasonal Brands to Stay on Consumers’ Radar

“Out of sight, out of mind” need not apply to brands that are seasonal, annual or under renovation. Multiple marketing options, beyond having a social media or mobile presence, allow for destinations, museums, hotels, TV series, film festivals and sporting events to remain relevant throughout the year.

We’ve gathered twelve methods across categories to show how selected brands remain in public view. While these are similar to initiatives that year-round brands use, they often require more resourcefulness and additional resources.

     Make your presence known

1. Events: Offering a rich history, scenic countryside and famous golf courses, Scotland is a popular destination. During off-season April, Scotland hosts Tartan Week in New York. Festivities include a parade with Scots (and Scottish terriers) in kilts, and a trendy plaid fashion show.

2. Pop-up/temporary exhibits: Amsterdam’s Van Gogh Museum closed temporarily for an upgrade and will re-open this spring. Meanwhile, museum-goers can view the Dutch painter’s works at Amsterdam’s Hermitage museum.

     Get the word out

3. Generate buzz: Last year when New York’s legendary Waldorf Astoria was under construction, the hotel created an amnesty program  where prior guests were encouraged to return items they’d “borrowed” during their stays to showcase in the lobby. The program was intended to feed the hotel’s social media platforms and appeal to younger guests.

4. Sharing expertise: New York’s Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum is currently closed during renovations. To draw designers’ notice, their acting director and curators started a blog. Called Object of the Day, it features graphic design items from the museum’s collection.

     Brand extensions

5. New location spin-offs: In 2002 Tribeca Film Festival launched to revive downtown New York after 9/11’s terrorist attack. The brand expanded its universe in 2010 by adding a Doha, Qatar location. In 2012 Sundance Film Festival introduced a London edition.

6. Counter-seasonal additions: Marketers learned about these brand extensions from the ski industry. Years ago Aspen was known just for snow sports. Ever since Aspen’s Food & Wine Classic was introduced, the town is also recognized for summertime culinary fare. Countless brands have copied this concept.

Read more

Notable Quotes from 2012 Events

Savvy presenters at business events know the audience is there to hear candid comments, fresh insights, and surprising anecdotes–not humblebragging, self-promotion or overused buzzwords. If presenters don’t deliver, attendees will tune out and spend more time networking outside the conference hall. Not every speaker got that memo, however: it’s still a challenge to sift through all the jargon and make each event worthwhile.

We’ve highlighted seven memorable quotes from various New York-based events we covered in 2012. They deal with a range of topics: creativity, media relations, CEO visibility, producing original content, the risks of using celebrity spokespeople, teamwork, publicity and controversy.

1. “Grit is especially important when it comes to creativity. If it was easy, someone else would have done it.

-Jonah Lehrer, author of Imagine: How Creativity Works and former contributor to The New Yorker and Wired magazines, delivered a keynote at ARF’s Re:think conference in March. In the ensuing months, Lehrer saw his own career falter after being accused of plagiarism and quote fabrication–so he didn’t follow his own advice.

2. “Now it’s a better age between journalists and PR. There’s an absence of friction, and PR is part of the data stream.

-David Carr, New York Times media reporter, spoke during Internet Week in May. Carr’s welcome though limited remarks on the dynamics of the relationship came in response to an audience question.

3. “A few companies with secure, confident CEOs take the lead on issues and speak out, but it’s hardly a universal practice.

-Richard Edelman, president and CEO of Edelman PR, addressed Ethisphere’s Best Practices in Ethics Communication event in June. His comments have since been echoed by others in the industry.

Read more

Men’s Fashion Finesse on the Event Stage

Awards shows aren’t the only venues where one can make a fashion statement. While conferences don’t feature red carpet entrances, the corporate event stage still represents a prime occasion for speakers to display their sense of style.

With more attention being paid to female executives’ wardrobes, our focus today is on their male counterparts. A recent New York Times article pointed to the rise in men’s fitted suits, but colorful accessories or footwear can also attract notice. Nowadays, almost anything to draw the audience’s gaze towards the stage instead of their mobile devices amounts to a good strategy.

We’ve compiled six examples based on New York-based events we’ve covered this year at which some element of the presenters’ attire was as buzzworthy as their performances.

Well Suited: Oakland Athletics general manager Billy Beane (left) sported a gray suit during an Internet Week talk in June. We couldn’t help but think that since Brad Pitt portrayed him in the movie Moneyball, he’s always got to look his best in public (though the actor himself seems to have stopped trying).

Pumpkin Power: Nothing conveys leadership like a bright crewneck sweater, since hoodies now are cliché. That must have been Google executive chairman Eric Schmidt’s view when he wore an orange pullover to an October appearance at the 92Y. As his interviewer, Kara Swisher, remarked, “By the way, I’ve got to tell you that you rock in that pumpkin [colored] sweater!”

In Mufti: Former (and perhaps future) TV show host/sportscaster Keith Olbermann wore blue sneakers to an April evening event at the Paley Center for Media. Sneakers were a smart choice that day, since he filed a lawsuit against Current TV, his former employer, then attended a New York Mets game and appeared later at the Paley Center. When you’re so busy, you need comfortable footwear.

Read more

TV on the Web Continues to Gain Ground

“TV series tell a story and web series create a world,” noted Sam Reich, president of original content at CollegeHumor Media. The world of web series like Dinosaur Office, (left) has taken off in recent years, attracting the attention of celebrities, TV networks and large viewing audiences. Reich appeared on an Advertising Week panel on Monday, along with other TV web content producers, marketers from TV networks and companies to offer a behind-the-scenes look at this popular format. Below are key takeaways.

As TV web content proliferates, the audience needs a roadmap. ”There’s an excess of YouTube videos, with approximately 72 hours of videos being downloaded every 60 seconds,” said Rob Barnett, founder and CEO of My Damn Channel. One example of an audience roadmap is USA Today‘s “TV on the web,” designed to help viewers sort through their many online programming choices.

Web TV comes in various forms. Barnett explains that “The different paths include mass aggregation of other content, re-purposing TV content on the web, and creating something original, which is a challenge”. Reich characterized his channel’s approach as “internet-forward and not TV-backward.”

TV networks use existing resources for their web offerings. “CBS uses adjacencies with our talent and programming”, said Marc DeBevoise, SVP and general manager at CBS Interactive Entertainment. For example, Jeff and Jordan Do America uses two characters who initially met on a CBS reality series. Live on Letterman shoots in the Ed Sullivan Theater with the same crew and musical artists who appear on “Late Night”. In DeBevoise’s words, “It’s an inexpensive way to launch live programming franchises.”

Read more

Four Ways CMOs of Major Companies are Using Social, Multimedia to Engage Audiences

Social media and PR were foremost on the minds of top marketers yesterday at Advertising Week in New York. As Stephanie George, Time Inc’s CMO said, “PR now has greater value than ever before. Through our own PR efforts we get the best response from our customers, and to do so you need to have high quality brands and content.”

George, along with CMOs from GE, CVS, and FedEx, focused on the impact of social media on their brands and company reputations. After the jump, other takeaways from the panel.

Read more

Walmart SVP Tony Rogers: Getting Moms Involved is the Hardest Part of Marketing to Them

Advertising Week kicked off today with a crazy long line outside of the Times Center on 41st Street as attendees waited (and waited) to check in and get started. Press was able to zip through quickly and our first stop of the week (PRNewser and our AgencySpy colleagues will be checking in on events throughout the week) was “Moms & the New Zeitgeist: The Complex World of the World’s Most Important Audiences.” That’s a name huh?

The panel was all about reaching moms successfully and just about everyone on stage, except for Walmart‘s marketing SVP Tony Rogers, was a mom. Moderated by The Wall Street Journal‘s Suzanne Vranica, the discussion covered a variety of topics outside of advertising.

According to the description in the Ad Week booklet, “Moms control more than $2.3 trillion in spending power, yet three out of four moms say marketers don’t understand them.” Perfect segue to the first question of the panel, “What’s the hardest thing about reaching moms?” Rogers said it’s getting moms involved in the process of creating the creative. Once you have that, reaching them is relatively easy. But moms are necessary for “shepherding you through the process,” he said.

“Getting the message is the hardest part,” he continued.

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>