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Posts Tagged ‘BBC’

4 Tips on Effective Tweeting from the BBC

The BBC rules Twitter in the UK—and they’ve got some tips for you to encourage more sharing on your own account. They know of what they speak: this is the year’s most-shared story so far. Who knew so many Britons loved the Fresh Prince?

In the wake of a study noting that the BBC is the most-shared account in the UK, Mark Frankel, assistant editor of social news, talked to journalism.co.uk and offered four tips to give your tweets maximum shareability.

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Don’t You Wish You Worked in One of These ‘Cool’ Offices?

We have no doubt that your agency has a very “cool” office; at the very least we can guarantee that it’s cooler than our office, which amounts to “the IKEA desk in our bedroom where we scroll through our Twitter feed for nine hours a day”. But the work spaces in this little piece of share-bait from the BBC are still pretty impressive, and we’re happy to report that Facebook, Google and Twitter do not make an appearance because WOW we are sick of hearing about how great it would be to work in Silicon Valley.

Check out these “beach hut” meeting rooms from London-based Man Bites Dog PR, whose office includes “a full-length indoor pier” inspired by its Brighton locale.

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A couple more are worth a look.

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BBC Announces Sherlock Return via Hearse

Well this was amusing: the BBC announced the air date for Sherlock season three premiere “The Empty Hearse” by driving an empty hearse around London.

The car, bearing the #SherlockLives tag and the date 01/01/14, drove around town to gawk at some “shooting locations” while tracked by the channel’s Twitter account. It was enough to make the show’s fans blow up like they’d just run into Doctor Who on the street or something.

Maybe it was a favor to all the fans who don’t have suave accents.

Scripted dramas bring people together like nothing else, don’t they?

Cookie Monster Knows How to Promote His New BBC Show

It’s Friday morning, so we thought we’d share what is, in our humbly professional opinion, the week’s most effective promo spot.

We always kind of assumed that British kids are too cynical for Sesame Street, but apparently that’s not true. There’s a new show called The Furchester launching on the BBC‘s preschool channel CBeebies next fall that will star Cookie Monster and Elmo (not evil Elmo), and for some reason the esteemed broadcasters chose to promote it on the super-serious Newsnight. Or Cookie Monster just video-bombed newscaster Emily Maitlis. You be the judge.

This might be too meta for us, but at least he didn’t say “broccoli.”

Was This the First Time a Customer Purchased a Tweet to Call Out a Brand?

Looks like we already have this week’s biggest PR fail: a traveler was so upset about British Airways losing his luggage that he paid to promote a tweet to all the brand’s followers letting them know how unpleasant his experience had been.

“Don’t fly @BritishAirways. Their customer service is horrendous.”

This is an unprecedented story, so it quickly spread across the web via Mashable and inspired CNN to interview disgruntled customer Hasan Syed, who started getting attention several hours before BA’s customer service reps even responded.

Pretty much every media outlet around has already run this story today because it is amazing, but we have to ask: will it change the way customer service works on social?

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Media Relations 101: Mila Kunis Shows Us How to Ace an Interview

We have a feeling the team responsible for promoting the upcoming Disney flick Oz the Great and Powerful cringed when watching this BBC interview with star Mila Kunis, in which she and a very nervous correspondent discuss Jägerbombs, Baywatch, UK football and the art of pouring a pint with no foam.

At the same time, we have little doubt that this was indeed the most interesting interview Kunis gave on her press junket–and it even makes us slightly more interested in her movie. Shouldn’t we all encourage clients to be a little more personable when speaking to the press?

On second thought, we probably shouldn’t…

BBC Directors Quit Over Handling of Pedophilia Scandal

Jimmy Savile BBC pedophileImagine this nightmare scenario: A well-known TV/radio host and media personality–let’s say Johnny Carson–dies peacefully after spending decades in the public eye as a respected entertainer, philanthropist and occasional newsmaker.

As the public mourns, a series of women currently in their 30′s and 40′s reveal inappropriate relations with the entertainer that occurred when they were still in their formative years, living at boarding houses and rehabilitation centers for troubled children. As the weeks go on, the number of accusers grows from a few to a dozen, then to several hundred. The worst part? Many of these women reported the abuse as it happened, but no one listened to them because the man in question was a celebrity beloved by an entire nation.

This is the story that’s captivated Great Britain for the past month–and it’s not going away anytime soon. The man was Jimmy Saville, and according to his many, many accusers, he molested teenage girls throughout his nearly 50-year career as a BBC TV/radio host and king of celebrity fundraisers. Yet many in the media seemed to accept him as an eccentric character with an unhealthy attraction to adolescent women. Friends and associates would often say, “Oh, that’s just Jimmy.”

Yuck. And it gets worse.

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Media Training Techniques and Trends

Media training is a high stakes field with visible results: Flawless public appearances are impressive while faulty performances can be devastating. We recently checked in via email with three media training specialists at PR agencies for their perspectives on the latest techniques, challenges and trends. Here’s the lowdown.

Training strategy is “about media mastery,” according to Leslie Linton, SVP media strategies at MWW in New York. “It’s about taking control of an interview, reacting quickly and effectively in a breaking news or crisis situation.”

Traditional and unconventional methods are used. “Clients increasingly recognize the importance of video training,” reported Ryan Richert, SVP media services at Edelman in Chicago. “You never know when a veteran print journalist will pull out an iPhone to record video of an interview. The New York Timesnew CEO comes from the BBC and embraces video storytelling.” Richert foresees journalists across major outlets using more video.

Linton strongly agreed with Richert on the value of video. She also utilizes “positive and negative sound bite examples and concentrates on bridging techniques to help clients out of troubling questions.”

“Our training program uses unexpected techniques,” said Stephen Brown, managing director at Cohn & Wolfe in Atlanta. “These range from ‘surprise calls’ from real or mock reporters during a session to surrounding interviews with props or lifelike set pieces.” He described another technique where a trainer writes a wire story in real-time during practice interviews, then shares the story so clients understand their statements’ immediate impact.

Media training adapts to rapid news cycles and social media networks. “Sound bites are shorter, simpler, and crisper,” Richert explained. “Watch the evening network news and you don’t see any more 15 second sound bites; most are about half that length. In the age of 140-character comments, executives can’t afford to be wordy, so I focus on helping our clients tighten up their talking points and cut to the chase.”

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Roll Call: Calypso Communications, Group M, Oxygen Media, and More

Calypso Communications, an integrated, full-service public relations, marketing, and creative design firm in Northern New England, recently promoted Creative Director Mike Teixeira to Vice President and Creative Director. Teixeira has been with Calypso for the past four years, during which time he has led the agency’s creative team and served as account lead on numerous client campaigns, resolving clients’ advertising, branding, and multimedia needs. Teixeira creates original graphics, effective layouts for web and print, and dynamic video, combining traditional as well as emerging media. With this promotion, Teixeira formalizes the growing role he has taken in setting the creative direction for the agency. (Release)

According to Ad Age, as part of Group M Global‘s leadership changes geared toward digital evolution, Group M North America CEO Rob Norman will take on the newly created role of chief digital officer for Group M Global. The changes will go into effect later this year. Prior to becoming Group M North America CEO in January 2010, Norman ran Group M Interaction, the department that oversees the operations, data processes, talent and tools essential to the media agencies’ digital tasks. (Ad Age)

Harleen Kahlon has been named SVP of digital at Oxygen Media. She had been EVP of business development, marketing and content strategy at Bundle Corp. In her new role, Kahlon, who is based in New York, will lead the digital team, developing plans for the release of new and returning series on digital platforms. (Release)

According to AdWeek, Mark Thompson, the outgoing director general of the BBC and chairman of BBC Worldwide, has been named president and CEO of the New York Times Co. The news comes eight months after Janet Robinson resigned as the CEO of the New York Times Co., Thompson first joined the BBC in 1979 as a production trainee and, with the exception  of a brief stint as CEO of Britain’s Channel 4 from 2002 to 2004, has spent the entirety of his career up until this point at BBC. (AdWeek)

BBC Ignites ‘Pandagate’ With Dumb Listicle Selection

Sweetie the panda. Photo: Andrew Milligan/PA

The BBC has released its list of female “Faces of the Year 2011.” For January, we have Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. March has Eman al-Obeidi, who was captured on film in Tripoli making frantic accusations of rape and assault against members of former Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi’s militia. But what’s that fuzzy black and white muzzle there for December? Why, that’s Sweetie, a damn panda.

Sweetie is half of a pair of panda bears (the other, a male that did not appear on the Faces of the Year 2011 for men list, is named Sunshine) that will be on loan to a zoo in Scotland for the next decade.

Foreign Policy‘s blog notes the outrage that the selection has caused, fueling a Twitter hashtag #pandagate, prompting members of the media to point out the gender issues this selection raises, and prompted a parody Twitter feed. The controversy also comes shortly after the news organization failed to nominate a woman for Sports Personality of the Year.

“For a number of people, the BBC’s decision to include Sweetie smacks of sexism,” the blog says. To be sure, the BBC isn’t helping its case with tweets like the one after the jump.

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