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Posts Tagged ‘Chris Brogan’

Is Social Media Marketing Eroding Trust Online?

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It’s a question we’ve been asking ourselves more and more lately, in light of recent findings such as Edelman’s Trust Barometer, that revealed the number of people who view their friends and peers as credible sources of information about a company dropped by almost half, from 45% to 25% since 2008.

Pete Blackshaw, exec VP of Nielsen Online Digital Strategic Services wonders the same, and details in a recent AdAge byline, “Why It’s Time to Hit the Reset Button on Trust.”

Given this, we reached out to the person who — literally — wrote the book on trust.

Julien Smith, co-author of Trust Agents with Chris Brogan told us, “People feel they are being sold by their peers and stuff they do on networks, so trust erodes,” while noting that the process is “natural.”

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Want Kim Kardashian To Tweet For You? It Will Cost $10,000

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What is the difference between “real” celebrities and “online” celebrities when it comes to social media marketing? The real celebrities get paid.

Last December, social media guru Chris Brogan received a $500 gift card from K-mart to write an entire blog post about his visit to a K-mart store. Reality show vixen Kim Kardashian‘s rate? $10,000 per-tweet, according to Advertising Age‘s Michael Learmonth. Yes, you read that right. Ten. Thousand. Dollars. Per. Tweet.

Kardashian works with “in-stream advertising” company Ad.ly, which also includes Stephen Colbert, Lauren Conrad and Dr. Drew as clients. Derek Rey, co-founder of Ad.ly, told PRNewser today Kardashian “can command” $10,000 per tweet and that Ad.ly limits its “publishers” — as it calls Kardashian — to one paid tweet per day as to not alienate her audience. “We’re not a polluter,” Rey said.

How well is Kardashian, and other celebrity publishers selling? “We could sell out that inventory if we want to, but we have a lot of advertisers,” he said. “We’re filtering them before we go to our talent.”

The above Tweet from Kardashian sure reads like an advertisement, but contains no disclosure. Rey told PRNewser that Carl’s Jr. is not an Ad.ly campaign. Indeed, Kardashian just inked an endorsement deal with the fast food chain to promote their salads. Despite the fact that she is a public spokesperson, Rey told PRNewser that with any instance of one being compensated, “you have to disclose.”

What Twitter Lists Mean for PR

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Twitter’s new Lists functionality rolled out last week to a certain amount of fanfare in the blogosphere, and in media circles. It’s designed to help users track groups of people, topics or trends without further clogging up one’s main feed. Some might see this as a virtual school lunchroom, where the cool kids get even better tables and nerds become literally listless. Social media consultant and immensely popular blogger Chris Brogan is concerned about the exclusionary aspects of stuffing people into little boxes. He has a point that drier things like travel, airline and workaday newsfeeds work well in Lists when you need a quick look at a niche universe.

Adding to Brogan’s take, Twitter in my opinion was a messy but fun replacement for RSS for some users. Now Twitter Lists can replace them altogether if one chooses. For example, with a few clicks you can create a List of news sources covering China, or a List to track the best deals on electronics with nary a complaint from the personally branded.

Poynter believes Lists could change the way Twitter is used altogether, by adding new elements of customization, discovery and curation (the buzzword for the fall), making Lists “something for every journalist, editor and news organization to keep a keen eye on.”

What about for the public relations business?

Our quick take is that Lists will create a new layer of lobbying for clients and PR people themselves as they ask to be included on the more prominent ones. Clever PR people will also use the function to track their clients and competitors, and to keep an eye on issues bubbling up that may require a response. More paranoid users and aspiring astroturfers now only need one account as you also have the option to create closed lists.

More after the jump:

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Chris Brogan on Building Trust And Its Impact on Business

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“I use trust to move revenue,” said Chris Brogan at an event held at the Harvard Club in New York this morning. Brogan was joined by his Trust Agents co-author Julien Smith, alongside David Maister and Charlie Green, authors of The Trusted Advisor.

The panel discussion examined how trust, one of the basic human qualities, can be earned and developed within communities not just for marketing or business purposes, but because, “people trust people, people don’t trust companies,” said panelist Charlie Green.

Smith added that the concept of trust hasn’t changed, but “the megaphone has changed,” referring to new media. Brogan took things one step further when he asked, “What if you made your most disgruntled customer your CMO? What effect would that have on your business?”

However, Brogan isn’t one to be vague when it comes to the end goal of building trust. He kept getting back to revenue and concrete business goals when asked how he measures his work with clients. “Yield over time” and “driving awareness into the sales funnel,” were two specifics he mentioned. Does this sound shallow? Perhaps, but Brogan and the panelists all insisted that businesses must move profitability from simply an “objective” to a “sideways outcome.” Meaning: make good stuff, treat people right, and the profits will follow.

Interview: Stephanie Agresta, EVP, Global Director of Digital Strategy and Social Media, Porter Novelli

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Stephanie Agresta joined Porter Novelli this past June, after more than 15 years in online marketing with brands including Microsoft, PepsiCo, iVillage, Barnes & Noble, Register.com and SpaFinder.

In addition to running her own consulting business, Agresta is known to many for hosting “The Techset” social media parties with PR 2.0 blogger Brian Solis. This is Agresta’s first agency gig, so we spoke with her about her first 90 days on the job (“It’s been extremely busy and very reflective for me of what’s happening in the industry.”), how her consulting work fits in with Porter Novelli (“…my work and all of my time is spent on Porter efforts.”) and her take on what should be handled by an agency and what should be handled internally when it comes to social media (“It really depends on what point in the process the brand is at.”)

You joined Porter Novelli in June as EVP and Global Director of Digital Strategy and Social Media. How have the first 90 days been?

The first 90 days have been very exciting.

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Bloggers and Marketers Closely Watching Proposed FTC Guidelines

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[Image: Adweek]

PR, marketing and advertising professionals are watching closely new proposed guidelines from the FTC that would make both companies and bloggers liable for any “false claims,” or if the blogger failed to disclose the nature of the relationship with a company or agency behind a post. The FTC has caught on to the fact that many bloggers are being paid – either in free products/services or cash – to plug those products or services on their site.

Edelman Chicago’s senior VP for consumer brands and social media, Danielle Wiley recently spoke with Advertising Age about this topic, among others. When it comes to paying bloggers, Wiley stated, “We’ve reached out to them [bloggers] with a product, and asked them to review it; they’ve come back to us and offered to do a positive review in return for pay. We don’t do that. We said no.”

That’s not stopping several high profile bloggers from attending and speaking at the upcoming IZEAFest this fall, the first annual conference for IZEA, formerly called Pay Per Post, which pays bloggers to mention and review products and services of their clients. Among the speakers include Ford social media lead Scott Monty, President of New Marketing Labs Chris Brogan and David Binkowski, SVP, Word of Mouth Marketing at Manning, Selvage & Lee.

When asked about his relationship with IZEA, Binkowski told PRNewser, “I personally don’t work for IZEA…and am going to be speaking about how Izea bloggers can work better with marketers and promote themselves while staying within the guidelines of the FTC.”

He also told us that at MS&L, “we do not pay for blog posts unless the bloggers have been hired to write on behalf of a client’s blog. Our firm’s roots are in earned media and the online extension of our practice is no different.” Binkowski did say in regards to Izea’s policies, “my personal position is that provided there is disclosure there is no issue.”

We agree with Binkowski’s take. If the blogger adheres to proper disclosure, there is no issue, from the FTC perspective. However, bloggers and companies like IZEA will have to be extra careful with disclosure if the new guidelines are approved. Things like IZEA blogger Julia Allison‘s disclosure slip up last month get much more serious. Also, the bigger issue may be how the disclosure changes that blogger’s long term credibility and relationship with readers, if at all.

PRNewser spoke to IZEA CEO Ted Murhpy at this year’s SXSW conference, were he discussed some of these issues.