TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘David Berkowitz’

What’s Augmented Reality? And Other Mobile Topics

Don’t we already live in an augmented reality? Kind of, but our reality will get even more augmented said John Havens, EVP of social media at Porter Novelli, during this morning’s panel discussion on mobile marketing at the PRSA Digital Impact Conference.

According to Havens, “AR is the GPS of your life” that could possibly turn every landscape into a screen of information, promotions, and advertising. While he told the audience not to be scared, it seems like we’re voluntarily signing up for a life lived in The Matrix, which kind of rattles the nerves.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Management 101

Management 101Become a better manager in our new online boot camp, Management 101! Starting October 27, MediabistroEDU instructors will teach you the best practices being a manager, including, how to transition into a management role, navigate different team personalities, plan a team event and more! Hurry, this boot camp starts Monday! Register now!

In Third Year, Shorty Awards Get Longer

Aasif Mandvi, host of this year's Shorty Awards

What a difference a year makes. Last year the Shorty Awards — dedicated to honoring the best producers of short, real-time content — had CNN anchor Rick Sanchez as host. This year, Sanchez is long gone from CNN, and in his place was Aasif Mandvi of the Daily Show.

The significance wasn’t lost on Mandvi, as the Daily Show was right in the middle of things when Sanchez was dismissed from CNN last fall. “You all must really hate Rick Sanchez,” Mandvi joked, insinuating it was a slap in the face for Sanchez to have someone  from the Daily Show hosting.

Mandvi also poked a bit of fun at the awards themselves, as he joked that they are “the most relevant awards show ever,” and said, “Let me be honest. I’m only here to increase my Twitter followers.”

That being said, in their third year, the Shorty Awards have only gotten bigger (and longer).

Read more

The FCC’s Embedded Journalist Is Really a Spokesman

n596844593_159272_4382.jpg

On Monday night the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) senior advisor to the chairman Steve Waldman tried out the agency’s “Reboot” message on a tough crowd: regulation averse digerati from Silicon Alley. The small group of entrepreneurs and very vocal journalist/bloggers including CUNY prof and BuzzMachine blogger Jeff Jarvis and Wired’s Spencer Reiss got together at the offices of PR firm Morris + King to hash out what Waldman is supposed to be doing.

Waldman, founder of BeliefNet (a longtime M+K client) and former Newsweek journalist, was tapped by his old friend, FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski to deliver a non-binding “Future of the Media” report by the end of this year. Genachowski brought in Waldman last Fall to sift through everything related to the state of news media today–existing research from places like Pew and Poynter Institutes, policies and pending initiatives such as the stance on Net Neutrality and the possible relaxation of cross-ownership rules between media companies.

“It’s an exercise in restraint. I can’t always mouth off with my point of view,” said Waldman. His job isn’t to figure out how to save the mainstream media from itself or fix business models, but to understand the various forces that pose a threat to the essential role of the news in holding commercial interests accountable.

Read more

PR Takeaways From The Google Nexus One Launch

Nexus_One2_270x491.jpg

In the biggest product launch of this short year, Google yesterday afternoon launched their first ever smart phone, the Nexus One. So how did the launch go?

The reviews

Walt Mossberg of the The Wall Street Journal was mostly positive. The New York TimesDavid Pogue was more negative. “Google Phone Is Not Revolutionary,” read his headline. Engadget’s Joshua Toplosky said the launch generated, “legitimate excitement.” CNET’s Rafe Needleman said, “it’s a solid step in Google’s continuing assault on new markets in general and on Apple in particular, but it’s not revolutionary the way the iPhone was…”

“It’s like the Obama of phones. Whether or not he’s really a great president, he can’t possibly live up to expectations he originally set,” said David Berkowitz, Senior Director of Emerging Media & Innovation at agency 360i.

Why No Video?

Flatiron Communications founder Peter Himler wondered why “Google’s PR peeps didn’t go through the trouble of web-streaming their own news conference, while arranging for on-site attendees to record wirelessly, to ensure optimal site lines and audio.” Instead thousands watched a stream set up by blogger Robert Scoble.

“They did the video feed for arguably less meaningful launches like Google Wave,” said Berkowitz.

Courting “influencers”

The list of people receiving Google’s phone in advance wasn’t at all limited to journalists. For example, venture capitalist Fred Wilson received the phone several weeks ago.

Google PR guaranteed feels more “comfortable” giving the phone to Wilson than say Engadget or the Times, as his review is much more likely to be positive. It was.

Wilson does not regularly review tech products and receiving such a high profile gadget in advance surely leads to excitement that could perhaps skew a review. Also, as a tech investor and not a journalist, he is less likely to be critical of the product.

The relatively new concept of “influencers” – some hate the term – means more and more people from different professions getting “pitched” by PR firms than ever before. Even PR people with popular blogs, like Edelman’s Steve Rubel or FutureWork’s Brian Solis get pitched. Robert Scoble, who was invited to the press conference, is a paid adviser to hosting company Rackspace.

Apple crowding

Per usual, Apple made it’s best attempts to crowd the news-cycle as we reported. “I think Apple got themselves in to the news with the tablet, and while iPhone would have been in the articles, it got Apple top of mind as usual,” said POP! PR Jots blogger and tech PR executive Jeremy Pepper. Edelman’s Steve Rubel saw things more positively. “Google plus phone is a surefire for press coverage as Godzilla plus city,” he told us.

Year In Review: Five Important PR Innovations of 2009

prnewser_2009 (2).gif

We begin our 2009 Year In Review coverage with a list of five important innovations that made the biggest impact on the PR industry over the last year.

Click continued for the complete list. Coming soon in our continuing year in review coverage: agency trends, the top five pitches of 2009 and more…

1) Facebook Makes Changes to “Fan Pages”

Facebook’s changes to their “Fan Pages” in March — which are destinations set up on the social network by everyone from celebrities to large brands — was possibly the innovation that brought brands and marketers on to the social network en-masse, giving them a formal and better way to communicate. Perhaps the biggest change was that status updates from fan pages now appeared in user’s news feeds “more often,” wrote David Berkowitz in Advertising Age. This positioned brands in the same way as ones’ “friends” on the social network for the first time.

Read more