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Posts Tagged ‘David Carr’

‘Personal PR Consultant’ to Roger Ailes Buys Ads Promoting Official Biography

cn_image.size.roger-ailes-bookAnd that’s the most interesting detail we took from the recent glut of reporting on Roger Ailes‘s reaction to Gabriel Sherman‘s “unauthorized” bio The Loudest Voice in the Room, which will finally hit shelves tomorrow.

Here’s another one: as part of what NYT‘s David Carr calls “Ailes’s permanent pushback campaign“, the Fox exec chose his own biographer, Zev Chafets (who also wrote about Rush Limbaugh) to pen a competing book called Roger Ailes: Off Camera. He then promoted that tome via Fox when it came out in March and placed an exclusive excerpt in Vanity Fair, of all places.

That’s not all, though.

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Sponsored Content: Essential Branding Tool, Death of Journalism or Both?

“Let me tell you a story about our sponsor…”

The chorus has spoken: brands who don’t jump on the sponsored content train are destined for the banner ad dustbin.

But is it true? David Carr of The New York Times isn’t so sure. Joe McCamby—a designer who created the very first banner ad in 1994 when MTV still played Nirvana videos and Facebook was the name of your high school art project—thinks the increasingly grey line between journalism and advertising could end up hurting publishers and, by extension, the brands that hire them.

Why?

The problem, as McCamby sees it, lies in publishers allowing PR and marketing agencies to post directly to their sites through their own content management systems. He thinks readers will question the origins and accuracy of every editorial piece in a given publication once they discover that said mag/website is in the sponsored content game. Those readers, he implies, wouldn’t find much value in sponsored content in the first place, and it can soil their opinions of their favorite magazines and websites.

How true is that fear?

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Notable Quotes from 2012 Events

Savvy presenters at business events know the audience is there to hear candid comments, fresh insights, and surprising anecdotes–not humblebragging, self-promotion or overused buzzwords. If presenters don’t deliver, attendees will tune out and spend more time networking outside the conference hall. Not every speaker got that memo, however: it’s still a challenge to sift through all the jargon and make each event worthwhile.

We’ve highlighted seven memorable quotes from various New York-based events we covered in 2012. They deal with a range of topics: creativity, media relations, CEO visibility, producing original content, the risks of using celebrity spokespeople, teamwork, publicity and controversy.

1. “Grit is especially important when it comes to creativity. If it was easy, someone else would have done it.

-Jonah Lehrer, author of Imagine: How Creativity Works and former contributor to The New Yorker and Wired magazines, delivered a keynote at ARF’s Re:think conference in March. In the ensuing months, Lehrer saw his own career falter after being accused of plagiarism and quote fabrication–so he didn’t follow his own advice.

2. “Now it’s a better age between journalists and PR. There’s an absence of friction, and PR is part of the data stream.

-David Carr, New York Times media reporter, spoke during Internet Week in May. Carr’s welcome though limited remarks on the dynamics of the relationship came in response to an audience question.

3. “A few companies with secure, confident CEOs take the lead on issues and speak out, but it’s hardly a universal practice.

-Richard Edelman, president and CEO of Edelman PR, addressed Ethisphere’s Best Practices in Ethics Communication event in June. His comments have since been echoed by others in the industry.

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Quotation Approval: PR No-No or Standard Practice?

Media personalities have made a bit of hay this week over the fact that the White House requested and received the right to review and approve of all the quotes that appeared in Michael Lewis’s upcoming Vanity Fair article on the president and his team.

Sounds like a media scandal, right? Well, not really. According to The New York Times columnist David Carr, quote approval is nothing but standard operating procedure–and it’s hardly limited to the world of politics. Subjects ranging from Wall Street super-bank CEOs to Silicon Valley tech pioneers and even startup managers have grown used to getting their way when it comes to press coverage. According to Carr and his colleagues, key contacts now expect “the kind of consideration that would have been unthinkable 20 years ago.”

In other words, journalists may have trouble accessing important figures unless they agree to this new kind of relationship, quotation approval rights and all. The practice may clash with classic journalistic ethics, but it’s part of the media landscape now. The Times claims that it will begin pushing back harder against this sort of behavior among its reporters, but from where we sit it looks a whole lot like everyday SOP.

We can only assume that this practice occurs at all levels of the PR industry. When does it become an ethical problem?

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Scandal du Jour: Plagiarism!

The Words” is a new film starring everyone’s favorite faux Frenchman, Bradley Cooper. Its plot, as we understand it, revolves around the concept of author as plagiarist–and while we can’t exactly recommend the movie based on its critical reception, we thought we’d use this opportunity (and the emergence of another small-scale plagiarism story) to examine parallel scandals that engaged the chattering classes this summer: the public trials of Jonah Lehrer and Fareed Zakaria.

Seems like everyone is copying the work of others these days–even noted wordsmith Chuck Norris has been caught red-handed. The two men at the center of this hot topic are very different personalities—and both the charges leveled against them and the public’s reaction to their respective PR crises have been very different as well. Fareed Zakaria is a respected journalist and TV news personality while Jonah Lehrer is (or, more accurately, was) a rising writer, speaker, and acknowledged expert in the realms of neurology and human behavior.

What, exactly, did they do?

Zakaria copied a paragraph of a Time article on gun control from an earlier New Yorker piece by historian Jill Lepore. CNN also found that one of his blog posts for CNN.com “contained similar unattributed quotes.” When accused of other acts of sloppy journalism, he lashed out at critics before backing down.

Lehrer’s first crime was plagiarizing himself—observers discovered that he often repeated passages that had appeared in previous columns or books. While this was bad news for Lehrer, it wasn’t necessarily the end of the world. Unfortunately, further investigations uncovered a disturbing history of similar behavior during his time at Wired and other publications. And that wasn’t the worst of it: The final, damning revelation was the fact that Lehrer had straight-up invented nonexistent Bob Dylan quotes for his bestselling book “Imagine”—and when pressed on his offense, he denied it and made more false claims before breaking down and confessing to his own dishonesty.

The saddest part about these stories is that both writers remain very talented, very busy men who obviously bit off more than they could chew. What conclusions can we, as PR and media professionals, draw from their cases?

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David Carr: My First Big Break

In the latest episode of mediabistroTV’s “My First Big Break,” New York Times columnist, and journalist’s journalist, David Carr remembers the first big story of his career.

For more videos, check out our YouTube channel and follow us on Twitter: @mediabistroTV

‘NYT’s David Carr at Internet Week: ‘Now It’s A Better Age Between Journalists and PR’

It was Page One on day two of Internet Week as visitors got an inside look from New York Times’ top media reporters.

Last year’s Page One documentary profiled The New York Times media desk, and today two of its best-known reporters, David Carr (left) and Brian Stelter (below), appeared on stage at Internet Week. They not only chronicled what it’s like to work at the “paper of record,” but also commented on the paywall, social media platforms, their relationship with PR professionals, and with each other. Below are highlights.

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The Former PR Executive Trying To Save Philadelphia’s Newspapers

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PRNewser has been covering Brian Tierney for quite some time. The former head of now Interupblic-owned Tierney Communications is putting up a battle to keep Phiadelphia’s major newspapers, the Inquirer and Daily News, out of the hands of creditors who have allowed them to stay alive.

In a profile this week, The New York TimesDavid Carr calls Tierney, “the kind of newcomer that longtime newspapermen love to hate. He’s slick, he cut his teeth in public relations, and he loves to wrap his mouth around a catchy phrase.”

Regardless of whether longtime newspapermen love or hate Tierney, his quest to keep Philadelphia’s newspapers out of the hands of creditors is coming to a climax, as Carr reports.

SXSWi in Quotes

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[Gym Class Heroes and Fall Out Boy's Pete Wentz at the Ustream Party. Courtesy Nick McGlynn for mediabistro.com/RandomNightOut.com]

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We’re still digging through our notes from SXSW Interactive and wanted to present some of our favorite quotes from the event:

“Institutions fight to keep problems that serve their solution.” –Clay Shirky, Consultant/Author/Teacher

“Social media scares the sh*t out of everybody, because they’re not sure what to do with it.” –Brian Solis, Author/PR Agency Owner

“We’re like eight years into this experiment.” –Foursquare co-founder Dennis Crowley on the location-based craze.

“PR is not going to fix your customer service department.” –Frank Elasion, Senior Director, Comcast National Customer Service

“Last year was about listening, this year is about action.” –Erin Korogodsky, Senior Account Manager, Scout Labs

“Criticism of the mainstream media is misconstrued.” –Markos Moulitsas, Founder, Daily Kos

“I can’t see a future where CNN is solely the middle man.” –Lila King, Senior Producer for Interactive Storytelling and User Participation at CNN.com

“[Gawker Publisher] Nick Denton won’t keep a guy in Mexico when it’s physically dangerous to be there.” –David Carr, The New York Times

“I’ve had enough of agency life.” –Michael O’Connor Clarke, VP Marketing Communications, Freshbooks

“We have such a value on immediacy.” –Randi Zuckerberg, Marketing Director, Facebook

“I would hope the link economy would reward investigative journalism.” –Pete Cashmore, Founder, Mashable

“The Huffington Post and Google News are siphoning off ad revenue from every newspaper in the world.” –Bob Garfield, NPR Correspondent/Author

“[Online publishers] make money the more often we click. They have an economic incentive to keep us distracted.” –Nicholas Carr, Author

“I’ll be the first to admit to being a bit green as an interviewer, and entirely new to SXSW.” –Umair Haque in his first blog post since his widely criticized interview of Twitter CEO Evan Williams.

“What’s popular isn’t always what’s good.” –Pete Cashmore, Founder, Mashable

“This is the Davos of digital.” –B. Bonin Bough, Director of Digital and Social Media at PepsiCo

“If you think the internet is going to replace cable, you’re crazy.” –Mark Cuban, HDNet

“Hey, is that Ashton Kutcher?” –Everyone at every party

PR Pros Sound Off on NBC Late Night Fiasco; Agency Continues To Pitch ‘Tonight Show’ Content

Several PR executives sounded off to the Times David Carr in a story today on the NBC late night fiasco. Only one – Matthew Hiltzik, who represents Katie Couric and Glenn Beck, among others – went on the record. Two others declined to go on the record because of business conflicts, something a prominent publicist also said to PRNewser yesterday.

Hiltzick declined to comment on NBC’s side of the equation, but did say Leno and O’Brien “deserve credit for being professional, addressing the issue head on, and maintaining their sense of humor on-air, while dealing with what everyone knows is happening backstage.” One publicist who declined to be named said everyone may be making much ado about nothing. “NBC is just one big hit away from all of these jokes being forgotten,” they said.

Regardless, digital agency New Media Strategies, who works with NBC, is still pitching “Tonight Show” content to the media. From a pitch sent to mediabistro.com today, highlighting NBC programming:

Tonight Show: Conan shared more opinions on the NBC reshuffling on his show last night. In two very funny clips, world leaders weigh in with their opinions and writer Deon Cole returns with his hilarious take on the situation, too. Then, Conan’s first guest Tom Brokaw took some time out to recall what he remembers about Conan in his early years at NBC.

PRNewser is keeping tabs to see if any additional announcements are made today.

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