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Posts Tagged ‘Eric Schmidt’

Content Forecast: Partly Sunny Skies, Some Clouds and Fog, High Revenue Pressure Front

AMC 2013 Logo FinalAs the lines around content continue to blur, the media industry assessment and outlook has been mixed. The AM2C / American Magazine Media Conference in New York this week convened a wide range of media, ad and tech industry leaders. They offered an array of diverse and sometimes controversial perspectives, and below are selected excerpts. Much like the classic Farmers Almanac, only time will tell how it all plays out.

Content quality: (Jonah Peretti, co-founder and CEO, BuzzFeed)

“It’s dangerous to only follow the optimization numbers. You need the creativity to experiment with lots of different content types. There’s a broad purview of topic areas we cover, from entertainment to investigative reporting. We create content that people are proud to share.”

“If you only create salacious garbage, then you end up with 90 percent of people that won’t want to read your site and won’t want to return.”

Discovering unique content: (Eric Schmidt, executive chairman, Google)

“In the media industry everyone is at the same confabs reporting the same things. The challenge is to report things that no one else has found.”

“Editorial content tells me things I wouldn’t have otherwise discovered. Google can program 90 percent of serendipity regarding what you’re reading and who your friends are, so we can suggest other interesting items. The other ten percent is one-offs, and there you need gifted editors.”

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Mediabistro Course

Storytelling for Media Professionals

Storytelling for Media ProfessionalsLearn how to use stories to inspire, connect, and persuade your clients! In this workshop starting September 3, you'll learn how to uncover stories in everyday life, incorporate stories into your media work, use storytelling techniques with clients, all to improve your pitch and presentation skills. Register now!

Weird PR: North Korea’s Kim Jong-un Gives Free Candy to Babies

Kim Jong-un North KoreaToday brings an interesting answer to that age-old question: How do murderous dictators endear themselves to members of their adoring/oppressed public (beyond the usual death threats, endless propaganda reels, and incredible displays of nationalistic pride like this one)?

North Korea‘s Kim Jong-un takes a novel approach to the challenge of better serving the people who never directly supported him in the first place: today his nation’s state-run media let the world know that he sent every single North Korean child 2.2 pounds of candy in celebration of his own mysterious birthday (no one can agree on his age).

While this tradition is unusual, it’s nothing new: it began with the current dictator’s own grandfather. The logic behind the strategy is perverse, but we have no doubt that these yearly gift baskets serve as bright spots for the citizens of a nation as restricted and suppressed as North Korea.

Now we’re curious about Google‘s “don’t be evil” co-founder Eric Schmidt, who arrived in the world’s evil-est country today alongside former New Mexico governor and United Nations ambassador Bill Richardson. What’s he doing there, exactly?

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Men’s Fashion Finesse on the Event Stage

Awards shows aren’t the only venues where one can make a fashion statement. While conferences don’t feature red carpet entrances, the corporate event stage still represents a prime occasion for speakers to display their sense of style.

With more attention being paid to female executives’ wardrobes, our focus today is on their male counterparts. A recent New York Times article pointed to the rise in men’s fitted suits, but colorful accessories or footwear can also attract notice. Nowadays, almost anything to draw the audience’s gaze towards the stage instead of their mobile devices amounts to a good strategy.

We’ve compiled six examples based on New York-based events we’ve covered this year at which some element of the presenters’ attire was as buzzworthy as their performances.

Well Suited: Oakland Athletics general manager Billy Beane (left) sported a gray suit during an Internet Week talk in June. We couldn’t help but think that since Brad Pitt portrayed him in the movie Moneyball, he’s always got to look his best in public (though the actor himself seems to have stopped trying).

Pumpkin Power: Nothing conveys leadership like a bright crewneck sweater, since hoodies now are cliché. That must have been Google executive chairman Eric Schmidt’s view when he wore an orange pullover to an October appearance at the 92Y. As his interviewer, Kara Swisher, remarked, “By the way, I’ve got to tell you that you rock in that pumpkin [colored] sweater!”

In Mufti: Former (and perhaps future) TV show host/sportscaster Keith Olbermann wore blue sneakers to an April evening event at the Paley Center for Media. Sneakers were a smart choice that day, since he filed a lawsuit against Current TV, his former employer, then attended a New York Mets game and appeared later at the Paley Center. When you’re so busy, you need comfortable footwear.

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Google’s Eric Schmidt: ‘It’s Very Easy to Criticize a Company That You’re Not In’

Google’s executive chairman expressed the headline’s sentiment during a discussion with Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher of All Things D at New York’s 92 Y yesterday evening. Schmidt’s comments varied from scripted to candid when discussing his Silicon Valley competitors and Google’s innovative products such as driverless cars.(Google’s Street Views Car, pictured at left, is currently on display at Mountain View’s Computer History Museum)

Schmidt leveled his harshest criticism at Microsoft, a company he excludes from his list of four major industry players (Google, Apple, Amazon and Facebook). He said, “They’re well-funded, but they haven’t been able to bring out state-of-the-art products in key areas. Let’s see what their new set of products does.”

Yet Schmidt sympathized with HP‘s recent struggles, describing his friend Meg Whitman as a “capable CEO.” He noted, while enterprise businesses once had lots of time develop various strategies, they’re now under considerably more pressure to find solutions to pressing problems as quickly as possible.

Schmidt also cut Facebook some slack, saying that “with a billion users, they can find ways to make money.” While acknowledging Facebook’s enormous database of registered users, he also pointedly noted, “Google wants more registered users, but we’re not forcing customers to sign up.”

Schmidt also lauded Twitter for doing “an excellent job of celebrity branding” while referring to the many stars who have used the platform to expand their followings and expressed hope that Google+ might one day become a key competitor.

Despite Schmidt’s widely quoted critiques about Apple’s inferior iPhone maps, he saved his highest praise for his main rival. “Apple did a phenomenal job of building integrated solutions and they did a tremendous job with tablets.” He also emphasized that Apple has more cash. He said that Apple “still has a special place in his heart”, which makes sense–Schmidt once served on Apple’s Board and had a close personal relationship with Steve Jobs.

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e-G8 Stress Internet Freedom at Meeting with G-8

German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Facebook's Zuckerberg, and Google CEO Eric Schmidt

The big message to come from the Internet business leaders who gathered in France for the e-G8 meeting this week was “Leave the Internet alone.”

Hosted by Publicis chief exec Maurice Lévy and serving as a prelude to the Group of 8 summit currently under way, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, Google’s Eric Schmidt, John Donahoe, chief executive of eBay, and Groupon founder Andrew Mason were among the digital bigwigs in attendance for the e-G8. They also had an audience with G-8 world leaders like British Prime Minister David Cameron and French President Nicolas Sarkozy, who has called for some regulation of the Web.

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Guest Post: Storytelling Has an Impact on Google’s Leadership Announcement

Last week, Google announced big changes in leadership. In today’s guest post, Lou Hoffman, CEO and president of The Hoffman Agency dissects the ways in which PR and storytelling shaped coverage of the news. Read on after the jump.

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Facebook or Gmail? Analysts are Watching

Facebook‘s new messaging system doesn’t seem to scare Google CEO Eric Schmidt. While some would suggest it could shake Google’s via its Gmail, his sentiment is “the more the merrier in the space for e-mailing” according to a story on San Diego News Net.

Referencing his comments at a Web 2.0 Summit in San Francisco Monday, the story says Schmidt is  pro-rivalry as a market-growing force. With analysts watching Facebook’s new system, questions are swirling about whether there will soon be a line in the sand between the two that could impact other tools Google currently provides as well as overall application use.

Schmidt focused his comments on development and Gmail’s current success. He also addressed the issue of privacy by saying that some of his comments have been “misinterpreted,” the article goes on to say.

Google CEO to Editors: ‘The Data Explosion Is Overwhelming All Of Us’

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Megan Garber of MIT’s Niemen Lab caught Google CEO Eric Schmidt‘s comments last night at the American Society of News Editors conference in DC. Here are Schmidt’s thoughts on data:

Between the dawn of humanity and 2003, roughly 5 Exabytes of information were created. (An Exabyte is roughly a million gigabytes.) We generate that amount in every two days now… So there is a data explosion. And the data explosion is overwhelming all of us. Of course, this is good business for Google and others who try to sort all this out.

RELATED: Google Founder to PR Department: You Have Eight Hours of My Time This Year

Super Bowl PR Winners and Losers

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[Coke teams up with The Simpsons for their Super Bowl ad.]

This is more AgencySpy’s territory, but PRNewser wanted to provide a quick recap of who “won” and who “lost” in last night’s Super Bowl marketing bonanza.

Winners:

Pepsi Refresh

Although the jury is still out on Pepsi’s decision to skip the Super Bowl in favor of a cause based social marketing campaign, Advertising Age reports that “pass or fail,” the campaign will be a “case for marketing textbooks.”

“It is surprising how much emotion is tied to the Super Bowl in terms of the industry and general public,” Chief Engagement Officer Frank Cooper told PRNewser last week in reference to how much press the brand has received for its choice not to buy an ad int the big game.

Bonin Bough, Global Director of Digital and Social Media for PepsiCo told AdAge that the strategy of using a TV spot and then making that spot into an online or Facebook strategy “does not exist anymore. That is not relevant whatsoever.”

Indeed, very few brands used their commercials as a vehicle to drive traffic to social sites. Did you notice that hardly any commercials promoted Facebook, Twitter or Youtube links?

AdAge reports that agencies Huge, Firstborn, Tribal DDB and VML have all picked up Pespi business in the last few months. Add that to the list of agencies PRNewser has confirmed to be working on the campaign — TBWA, R/GA, Epiphany/Porter Novelli, Edelman and Weber Shandwick — and that brings the total to ten PR and advertising agencies.

Google

Google’s simple ad seemed to have the highest emotional connection with views.

“We didn’t set out to do a Super Bowl ad, or even a TV ad for search. Our goal was simply to create a series of short online videos about our products and our users, and how they interact. But we liked this video so much, and it’s had such a positive reaction on YouTube, that we decided to share it with a wider audience,” wrote Google CEO Eric Schmidt in a blog post. Just the fact that Google advertised in the Super Bowl will get the company a slew of press.

The Late Show with David Letterman

The ad featuring Jay Leno, Oprah Winfrey and David Letterman is getting lots of buzz, for obvious reasons.

Focus on The Family

Regardless of where you stand on the issue, the group’s ad garnered a ton of media attention. “By setting up an expectation that it was going to do something controversial, Focus made it easy to come off as moderate and inclusive by comparison” writes Jeff Bercovici at Daily Finance.

Losers:

GoDaddy

The domain seller’s ads were predictable, yet not memorable. What does GoDaddy do again?

The U.S. Census Bureau

2.5 million of our tax dollars for that? The Bureau had to issue a press release defending itself against criticism.

Additional notes:

The New York TimesStuart Elliott live-blogged the ads.

• Agency Mullen and monitoring vendor Radian6 also hosted “BrandBowl” which examined 98,656 tweets from ad and marketing types. These Tweets, “provided an overall ranking of the brands advertising on the game based on a composite score that takes into consideration both volume of tweets and sentiment (both positive and negative).”

• AgencySpy will have more commentary today as well.

Leave your take on who “won” and “lost” in the comments.

Google CEO Takes To WSJ To Defend Google News

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What do you to when one of media’s most recognizable executives — News Corporation CEO Rupert Murdochaccuses your company of stealing its content? You take to one of his prized media properties and write an op-ed on the subject.

This is what Google CEO Eric Schmidt did in a piece, “How Google Can Help Newspapers” which appeared in The Wall Street Journal yesterday. Schmidt makes a number of points, and counters Murdoch directly:

But as Rupert Murdoch has said, it is complacency caused by past monopolies, not technology, that has been the real threat to the news industry.

We know that Google’s founders disdain of marketing and PR, however the company does have more than 130 people in its communications department and finds itself on the defensive perhaps more than ever.