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Posts Tagged ‘Giorgio Armani’

Top New York Times Fashion Critic Resigns

t-logo-190This morning brought big news for everyone in fashion PR: Cathy Horyn will step down as The New York Times‘ chief fashion critic after more than 15 years in the position, effective immediately.

As Capital New York reports, Horyn “occupied one of the fashion industry’s true critical pulpits” but was not always a favorite among the design community due to her propensity for brutal honesty in reviewing designers’ newest collections and personal comments about designers themselves; Giorgio Armani and Yves Saint Laurent famously banned her from their shows.

On a somber note, the given reason for this last-minute announcement is the illness of Horyn’s partner, former Liz Claiborne executive Art Ortenberg.

Notes from the memo just released by Times executive editor Jill Abramson and styles editor Stuart Emmrich after the jump:

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Galliano’s Dismissal, From a Branding Perspective

John Galliano was fired from Christian Dior and reaction is pouring in. On AllTwitter, our colleagues note the disappointment from fans, the joke from Steve Martin, and both the praise and skepticism over Natalie Portman‘s reaction. The Oscar winner is also the spokesperson for the Miss Dior Cherie fragrance. In a statement, she expressed her “shock” and said she would not “be associated with Galliano in any way.”

In a sign of the disconnect between some members of the fashion world and everyone else, The Hollywood Reporter also took a summary of the reaction from designers, models, and members of the media. The article quotes Giorgio Armani: “I’m very very sorry for him. It’s obviously a difficult time for him. I am also very sorry that they videotaped him without him knowing.” Really?

No matter how sorry you do or don’t feel for Galliano, Dior did the right thing, Forbes maintains. We agree.

Update: Galliano issues an apology.

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