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Posts Tagged ‘H&M’

David Beckham: Covered or Uncovered? Fans Can Now Vote for Ending of H&M Underwear Ad

We recently brightened your day and renewed your hope for the future by telling you that David Beckham would be appearing on your TV screen in his H&M skivvies sometime during the Super Bowl. The first interactive spot of its kind, the ad will allow owners of Samsung Smart TVs to purchase underwear with a few clicks of their remote controls. But if you don’t have a Smart TV, fret not; the ad just got a bit interactive for you, too–albeit, still not in quite the way you’re probably hoping.

H&M announced that, starting today, fans can vote on the ending of the commercial, directed by action movie maker Nicholas Winding Refn. There are two potential endings, tantalizingly titled #covered and #uncovered, and you can vote for your favorite on the retailer’s website.

Fair heads-up: If your initial instinct is to vote “uncovered,” you should know that, after checking out the website, I found that (of course), the super-provocative words actually have little to do with the soccer star’s stage of undress; he is, in fact, in his underwear regardless (cue collective sigh of relief). Plus, even if that were what we were voting for, after watching the teaser (below), I have to admit that he looks so damn good putting his shirt back on, I’d be happy either way.

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Super Bowl Highlight: Buying David Beckham’s Underwear With Your Remote

David-Beckham-launches-hi-007

At some point during this year’s Superbowl, David Beckham will appear on your screen in his underwear.

Do I have your attention?

Good, because for those of you with a Samsung Smart TV, it gets even better — thanks to the first television spot of its kind, you’ll actually be able to interact with what you see on screen…albeit, probably not in quite the way you’re hoping.

While Beckham models H&M‘s underwear line during the retailer’s Superbowl ad, presumably-hypnotized viewers will be able to purchase the product (the underwear, not the model) by using their remote to navigate a pop-up menu that will appear on the side of the screen.

But in a world of insta-purchases being made on mobile devices all the time, is there a place for interactive TV ads? Mike Fitzsimmons, CEO of Delivery Agent, the agency behind the ad, certainly seems to think so. Read more

Garment Industry Opts for Makeover After Bangladesh Disaster

The factory collapse that killed more than 1,100 people in Bangladesh this April is by no means the first tragedy to strike the garment industry in recent years—but it does look like the culmination of an ongoing PR challenge that could reshape the way major clothing brands market their products. The earliest evidence of this change comes on social media, where companies that had operations in the factory have already begun responding to the demands of consumers and labor activists.

The New York Times reports that many businesses and industry groups now plan to follow the food industry’s example by offering the public more detailed information about how and where their clothes are made. H&M and Zara have agreed to sign a new “factory safety accord,” and major names like Disney, Nike, and Walmart may follow with campaigns designed to appropriate the “green,” “organic,” and “fair trade” themes favored by food and household goods marketers in recent years. The purpose of this material, of course, will be to highlight the brands’ corporate social responsibility efforts and distance them from horrific accidents like the one in Bangladesh.

It’s nothing new for fashion: upstarts like American Apparel began using their own “fair trade” practices as key selling points some time ago. Yet, despite AA’s success, retailers like Maggie’s Organics and Everlane (tagline “Luxury Basics. Radical Transparency.”) remain few and far between.

Not for long.

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Which Brands’ ‘Green’ Claims Are Legitimate?

Running a green/sustainable/environmentally friendly brand is obviously a big deal now. Following retail giant H&M‘s promises to use its water responsibly (under the watchful eye of the World Wildlife Federation), we figured we’d revisit the issue.

The public is understandably skeptical of such “sustainability” pledges, especially when made by notorious polluters like BP. It’s sort of like Apple promising to stop using child labor to build your iPhone or McDonald’s swearing by “certified sustainable fish” for its seafood McBites: how much of this is for real and how much of it is just another “greenwashing” corporate reputation stunt?

It’s one thing for a brand to release ads highlighting its environmental efforts but, as the Greenpeace Stop Greenwashing project tells us, most of these companies aren’t really all that interested in making their practices more sustainable–especially if they operate in the energy, automotive or forestry industries.

BP is a great example of a brand that just doesn’t have much credibility in the environmental sphere, no matter how many enthusiastic press releases its team writes. Puma, on the other hand, has begun publishing regular accounts of its supply chain’s influence on the environment, making clear that many of its practices have a serious impact and setting related goals that can be measured statistically.

So tell us: which brands do you trust on the sustainability front? While we’re at it, we have a couple more questions:

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Miss America Promotes All Canadian Brands at Public Appearances

Miss America Mallory HaganWe don’t follow the Miss America pageant too closely–we usually ignore it like we ignore Miss USA because we assume that Donald Trump is somehow involved.

We were pleased, on some level, to learn that the latest winner, Mallory Hagan, hails from Brooklyn (which is our longtime home, though we can’t claim it as our hometown), but we’re a little confused by her latest WWD interview

She confirmed that she won’t be attending FIT until another winner is crowned (OK, we get that) but refused to take the opportunity to promote some of her favorite designers, saying:

I will keep that to myself for now. When I’m done being Miss America, I will tell you a myriad of names.

…while listing Forever 21, Zara and H&M as her favorite stores (yeah, right). Then the interviewers asked her a more sensitive question: why will she be wearing only Canadian label Joseph Ribkoff at all of her public appearances as Miss America? We think this is a good question from a PR perspective, but she quickly shut the query down:

“It shouldn’t matter where the clothing comes from,” since her Miss America mission is more about broadening education and empowering women.

The answer: she’s wearing Ribkoff because it was one of the pageant’s main sponsors, along with cosmetics brand Amway Artistry. We don’t mean to go all nationalistic here, but isn’t it a little strange for a Canadian brand to sponsor the Miss America winner, much less the pageant itself? Surely there’s an American brand willing to step up and embrace a great PR opportunity like this one, right?

How Zara Changed the Fashion World

Zara New York City retail branchYou know Zara. You’ve heard of Zara. You’ve seen Zara around. The mid-range Spanish clothing maker is now the world’s largest fashion retail brand. How big is it? Top rival H&M operates about 2,500 branches around the globe, while Zara’s parent company Inditex has more than 5,900–including more than 2,000 in Spain alone.

In the midst of a recession that’s proven especially severe in that corner of Europe, Zara rose to the very top of the fashion business.

Yet the most interesting aspects of the Zara empire are the things the company doesn’t do. It doesn’t create partnerships with top designers. It doesn’t try to label its products “upscale”. It doesn’t tweet very often, and it definitely doesn’t organize any one-off promotional stunts. Its founder, now one of the world’s richest men, refuses to give interviews.

The company doesn’t even create ads–that’s right, no ads at all. In fact, the PR rep who spoke to The New York Times during an extended magazine profile refused to give her name in keeping with her employer’s “modesty rules”. Not the kind of operation you’d expect from such a massive brand.

So how did the minds behind Zara create such a monster? To put it simply, they followed one rule: listen to your customers and respond accordingly by giving them what they want, not what you tell them they should want.

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Will Maison Martin Margiela Bring the Crazy to H&M?

The Belgian design house Maison Martin Margiela is responsible for the coat at left. Which is wonderful because if I had to sketch a coat, that’s what it would look like. A big rectangle with buttons and a collar, perfect for rain, jabbing people who try to read over my shoulder on the subway, and planking.

The same design house that made this fantastic coat is going to design a capsule collection for H&M. The retailer has done past collections with Karl Lagerfeld and Stella McCartney, among others. But this partnership begs the question of whether there’s something wacky in the offing.

To be fair, if you take a look at the Margiela website, there are a lot of very wearable (and beautiful) things. But it would be interesting, if not at all profitable, to bring something incredibly high fashion and out there to H&M on this one.

After the jump, there’s a clip that announces the collaboration — available November 15 — and it shows us a rather ordinary sweater dress. Maybe there’s a surprise in the back?

Speaking of collaborations, the Banana Republic/Trina Turk partnership also includes a video to drive awareness for pet adoption at the ASPCA. So they put a dog named Jorda in a hat. Yesss. That clip, also after the jump.

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H&M and Marni Building Awareness With Instagram

Continuing the fashion industry’s increasing digital efforts, H&M and Marni have launched an Instagram contest on H&M’s Facebook page called “What Inspires You?” to promote their capsule collection available on March 8. (Click on the second link to also take a look at the clip for the collection, directed by Sofia Coppola.)

Participants can win items from the collection when they enter with an Instagram photo, marked #MarniatHM. Users will vote on their favorites and a judging panel of bloggers including Fashionista’s Leah Chernikoff and BlameItOnFashion‘s Marie Hindkær Anderson will make the final decision. Whispr Group, a social media firm, is working with both brands on the campaign. According to info from the firm, the page has already amassed 60,000 page views in the first few days of the contest.

H&M recently launched its Instagram account, hennesandmauritz.

H&M To Take U.S. By Storm With Beckham Underwear Ad

This morning, we had a link to the story about David Beckham’s Super Bowl underwear ad for H&M. Now we have video.

Beckham collaborated with H&M on a line of underwear, which will be launched with a smoking clip of the international soccer superstar doing his best D’Angelo impersonation.

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Fashion’s High/Low Collaborations Measured By Media Impressions

We have another high/low fashion collaboration on our hands — Versace has teamed with H&M for a capsule collection that will be in stores tomorrow, which is sure to incite a fair amount of frenzy.

This one, of course, follows in a long line of collaborations, most recently the Missoni/Target collection that caused mass hysteria in person and online. Interestingly, given all the consumer interest, The New York Times says that it’s the media attention that really pays off for the retailer side of these partnerships.

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