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Posts Tagged ‘how to pitch magazines’

Pitch Your ‘Weird’ Clients to Inked

When it comes to publicist pitches, “I’m down for any subject: the weirder, the better,” says Inked editor Rocky Rakovic.

The lifestyle pub, which Rakovic describes as “the outsider’s insider,” goes beyond the world of tattoos in its coverage: fashion, booze, cars and art all find their way into the pages of the mag. “Just think of us sort of like a Maxim [except] everyone in the magazine has tattoos, so it’s like Maxim plus tattoos, minus the articles that they do [on] the very ‘clean’ men’s lifestyle,” he said.

For more details and editors’ contact info, read How To Pitch: Inked. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

Pitch Products to Running Times

For years, Running Times‘ closest competition was Runner’s World, another book that covers the world of runners with industry trends and service pieces. However, Running Times sets itself apart by being the go-to resource for more experienced athletes.

“We’re like taking the senior-level course rather than Running 101,” said editor-in-chief Jonathan Beverly.

The section of the book that is most ripe for PR pitches is “Gear and Trail.” Think your product or client would fit well there?

Get advice for PR pitching, plus a full list of editors’ contact info in How To Pitch: Running Times. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

How to Get Your Clients Featured in New York

Ever since it started out as an insert in the New York Herald-Tribune, New York magazine has made a name for itself as the trusted confidante of the city’s most knowing readers.

And editorial director Jared Hohlt has some great advice if you’re looking to pitch your clients to the pub. “Publicists should note that we are not restricted to ‘New York area-only’ profiles,” he explained. “If we are doing a profile of someone, we do want to make sure that our competitors aren’t doing the same sort of piece at the same time, but that kind of goes without saying.”  

Get more details and editors’ contact info in How To Pitch: New York. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

Pitch Fashion and Beauty Clients to Marie Claire

With a total readership of 3.8 million, Marie Claire offers a compelling and unpredictable mix of articles underscored with wit and attitude. Its readers are as passionate about human rights around the world as they are about the latest fashion trends to hit the runway, so there are many clients a PR pro could pitch to the mag.

Of course, fashion and beauty pitches are welcome, but publicists can also pitch stories about politics, women in the news and human rights. When pitching, keep in mind that the magazine plans issues several months in advance, so when it’s winter, think spring!

For more details and editors’ contact info, read How To Pitch: Marie Claire. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

Pitch Wedding and Travel Clients to Destination

In recent years, the market for destination weddings has grown to over 25 percent of the wedding market, and Destination Weddings & Honeymoons grew along with it. The mission of the pub is to give readers help with planning and ideas “to get through the experience with minimum stress and maximum joy,” said editor-in-chief Susan Moynihan.

PR pros can pitch everything from destinations and hotels to the invitations and flowers for the big day, as long as it relates to a destination wedding. “We rarely cover a venue, hotel or destination without a staff member or freelancer visiting,” said Moynihan. “That said, we are always interested in newsworthy nuggets, such as hotel openings, hotel renovations, hotel additions, new packages, new hotel brands/concepts, real weddings, news within a destination (easier marriage requirements, new independent wedding sites). Product pitches are also very helpful for our FOB departments.”

For editors’ contact info, read How To Pitch: Destination Weddings & Honeymoons. [subscription required]

Pitch Your Beauty Clients to Z-Life

Z-Life Magazine is the go-to pub for Zumba devotees. With an estimated 12 million people around the world who are enthusiasts of the program, Zumba Fitness started publishing the mag in 2010. Since then, the pub has established itself as an edgy health/beauty/fitness resource for women. You won’t see Z-Life publishing stories that you would find in a traditional health/fitness mag. Instead, readers are interested in bucking the status quo.

Z-Life EIC Andrea Carneiro welcomes PR pitches for fun, edgy products that are unique, or are connected to a celebrity trend. “Our readers are very into beauty and trends,” she said. “They’re definitely not girls that roll out of bed and go to the gym. They always look great.”

For editors’ contact info, read How To Pitch: Z-Life Magazine. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

Pitch Your TV Clients to TV Guide

TV Guide‘s mission is simple: to help people sort through the overwhelming choices of TV shows. Because of its unique positioning as the only magazine focused solely on TV coverage, TV Guide is the definitive resource for rescuing readers from aimless hours of channel surfing.

“We watch everything and make editorial choices in terms of what we’re going to feature in order to guide people to what they should be watching — what the best stuff is, what they need to be aware of, what’s becoming culturally relevant,” saidarticles editor Bruce Fretts.

The best part is, editors at the mag are very welcome to PR pitches. They’re open to anything that can be used to draw in viewers (and readers): guest stars, exciting plot twists, etc. One caveat: The mag focuses on the careers and professional lives of stars, so anything gossipy won’t fly.

For editors’ contact info and more guidelines on pitching, read How To Pitch: TV Guide. [subscription required]

Pitch your Food Clients to Clean Eating

Food mag Clean Eating welcomes PR pitches, as long as publicists do not email and call with too many follow-ups. “Focus on product pitches, cookbook pitches — clean, please — and personality pitches,” said editor-in-chief Alicia Rewega. The mag features two chefs in each issue for the “Cooking With” and “Chez Chef” sections, plus there are a handful of other sections that PR pros are welcome to pitch to.

Clean Eating isn’t a fad diet or a quick fix — it’s a lifestyle, one that focuses on giving your body nutritious foods in their most natural state,” said Rewega. “Recipes offer gourmet flavor without demanding that our readers be gourmet chefs. We take recipes that are traditionally less than healthy and clean them up for our readers and offer time-saving tips and tricks, foodie finds and gadget profiles, plus discussions of food-related studies and topics du jour. We believe that taste and health need not be mutually exclusive — Clean Eating delivers both.”

For editors’ contact info and more details on what to pitch, read How To Pitch: Clean Eating. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

Pitch Your Clients to The Intelligent Optimist

Most sections of this positive pub are open for PR pitches, including features and book excerpts. Formerly known as Ode, The Intelligent Optimist boasts an international readership that is passionate about innovative technology, sustainability, health and spirituality, nutrition and personal growth.

For starters, publicists can pitch their clients for “Intelligent Optimist,” which focuses on individuals who know or are inspired by someone who fits the moniker, and “Possibilities,” which is devoted to innovative news, such as organic fast food chains or new ways to produce plastic.

Get editors’ contact info and more advice on what to pitch in How To Pitch: The Intelligent Optimist. [subscription required]

Pitch Big Apple Clients to Manhattan

Though the upscale lifestyle mag has struggled to find its footing after launching in the thick of the economic crisis, “It’s now starting to hit its stride with the affluent New Yorker who has a wide range of interests,” said editor-in-chief Cristina Cuomo.

Unlike other city magazines, Manhattan is more like a national book with local flavor, as some of the features are re-purposed for each of Modern Luxury’s publications. Other than that, all of Manhattan‘s coverage is specific to New York City, highlighting the best in restaurants, nightlife, Broadway and everything in between.

Find out which sections are most open to publicist pitches in How To Pitch: Manhattan. [subscription required]

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