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Posts Tagged ‘journalism vs pr’

A PR Look at the ‘-Isms’

isms

Ever since Jill Abramson has been putting The New York Times on blast about her pay scale issues for the past 17 years, the word “sexism” has appeared in many headlines. People who want to claim intolerance in any industry, at any level, often name an ‘-ism’ even if they have no clue as to what it means.

It’s a miracle activist groups don’t have their own version of the “Urban Dictionary”, because they are so screwing with Merriam and Webster right now. An example: cries of “racism” in the face of Michael Sam hate (which is about his sexual orientation, not his skin color).

To wit, we thought we would help the huddled masses understand “-isms” in their truest sense–the way they affect public perception. Read more

Mediabistro Course

Mediabistro Job Fair

Mediabistro Job FairLand your next big gig! Join us on January 27 at the Altman Building in New York City for an incredible opportunity to meet with hiring managers from the top New York media companies, network with other professionals and industry leaders, and land your next job. Register now!

Hack Turned Flack: Former Journalist Explains the Transition


Some in the media world are under the impression that journalism and PR are basically much one and the same. While that’s obviously not true, the two disciplines require some of the same skill sets, so the differences are well worth noting—especially if you’re a journalist looking to make the transition or a PR pro who wants a better understanding of the journalist’s perspective.

In a recent post on Contently‘s Content Strategist blog, former journalist and current director of content and media strategy at Bateman Group Elinor Mills explains those differences in greater detail. It’s well worth a read, but we’ve picked some highlights:

Read more

Hack to Flack: How Being a Good Journalist Will Make You a Better PR Pro

Today we’re very glad to bring you another guest post by Lindsay Goldwert, a senior program executive at Hotwire PR who jumped into the field after performing editorial duties for New York Daily News, ABCNews.com, CBSNews.com, CourtTV, Glamour and Redbook. Here’s her previous post on writing better pitches.

I won’t lie — the first two months at my new job were an adjustment.

After spending twelve years as a working journalist, I simply did not know how to operate on the other side. The PR industry’s language confused me; I felt like I was starting over, and it was a scary, unsettling feeling. Most painfully, I was mourning the loss of a career path. It hadn’t treated me all that well but, frankly, it was was all I knew.

Then again, I hadn’t been doing much real journalism lately. Wasn’t that why I quit in the first place?

I turned a corner a few weeks ago and, for the first time in many years, I’m experiencing the warm glow of possibility. It’s a good feeling to leave a shrinking, scrambling, panicking field for one that’s growing, experimenting and writing its own rules for success. Ideas are valued. Insight is appreciated. Your time is money. Industry knowledge is gold.

For others who are contemplating a career shift, I offer these reasons why you may feel extremely valued in the PR field (and not just for your media contacts):

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Should Journalists Abstain From Voting?

In case you haven’t noticed, professional journalists have a PR problem. The public’s opinion of their craft and “the media” they inhabit hit an all-time low last year. This finding reflects an increasingly polarized electorate filled with fed-up citizens who often retreat to openly partisan news sources because they believe all other media outlets to be tainted by bias in some form.

The fact that a healthy, functioning democracy needs journalists to survive should go without saying–and despite working in public relations, we’re a little disturbed to learn that PR professionals currently outnumber them 4 to 1 in this country. So how can journalists improve the public’s perception of the work they do?

For some, the answer is clear: don’t vote.

This is not a new debate. In fact, the issue arises during nearly every election cycle. Austin Business Journal editor Colin Pope believes that the act of choosing a candidate or privately voting on any given issue affects his ability to inform the public as a reliably objective voice; in his opinion, he essentially forfeited his right to vote when he decided to report on the news for a living.

We think it’s safe to say that most journalists do not agree.

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Mythbusters: PR Is NOT Easier Than Journalism

Raise your hand if this has ever happened to you: You’re at a party when a writer friend (okay, associate) comes up and starts grilling you about your job. ”How much writing do you really have to do?” “Which is better: the agency or in-house side?” “Uh, are you hiring?” (By now, you’re probably raising both hands and stomping your feet, no?)

Veteran publicists know that while PR and journalism both require having great contacts and writing skills, the similarities pretty much stop there. In Mediabistro’s latest AvantGuild article, journos who have made the transition discussed some of the hard-learned truths (and myths) about working in PR.

For starters, public relations is not easier than reporting. “Corporate culture is an adjustment,” explained Ramey Becker, former TV reporter and current director of communications for Financial Planning Standards Board. Perhaps most eye-opening, she said, “You realize how much you don’t know about the real (read: business) world.”

Read more in What Journalists Should Know Before Switching to PR. [subscription required]