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Posts Tagged ‘Kevin Roose’

Twitter CFO Doesn’t Understand How Twitter Works

Anthony Soto

(Source: Brian Ach/Getty Images) 

In most cases, the surest sign of excellent internal communications is a team’s ability to fully advocate for and support the brand in any situation.

Do people from Disney have a hard time discussing magic? Do employees of any sports team hesitate to talk up their players? No, because they are acolytes, brand champions and, perhaps, consumers of the Kool-Aid.

You’d think a company like Twitter — which is all about communications — would be on top of its own messaging efforts. But company CFO Anthony Noto made national news yesterday thanks to his seeming inability to figure out how the service’s direct messaging feature works.

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Fusion Is Your Tech Media Company to Watch

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Today in Media Trends, Fusion has become an outlet to watch in the weeks and months ahead for anyone working in the tech/startup sectors.

Not familiar with Fusion? That’s understandable — in the past we may have confused it with the Canadian version of MTV. But the cable channel, created by a partnership between Disney/ABC TV and Univision, just turned one year old and made a slew of big hires that hints at its ambitions to lead the crowded tech news space:

If you have clients in tech, these people just got a lot more important. You should probably click on their names and follow them all on Twitter if you don’t already.

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Tim Cook Almost Apologizes to Celebs for iCloud Leak

timcook-300x258There’s been a lot of news about Apple this week, and there will be even more news about the company next week when it introduces the world to a watch, a new version of iOS, a new iPad model, a new iPhone and a bigger iPhone (according to Kevin Roose).

On the “celebrity scandal” front, we’d like to turn your attention to the interview with CEO Tim Cook that went live on The Wall Street Journal last night. It’s particularly striking given the company’s “we’re looking into it” statement from Monday.

It also fits very well with the narrative provided by our anonymous “insider” source, who told us that Cook is looking to put a friendlier — and more apologetic — face on the company he runs.

Let’s just say Steve Jobs would not have given an interview like this one.

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SeaWorld Finally Confirms a Blackfish Backlash to Investors

SHAMU

SeaWorld has been very insistent in its messaging since CNN’s Blackfish expose surfaced with variations on “The documentary is skewed and it will not affect our business in any way.”

Despite this claim, the company and its firm 42West launched an aggressive campaign to counter the film’s influence and we posted extensively.

Time has revealed some small cracks in the  facade: Southwest Airlines, for example, recently ended its 26-year partnership with the resort while maintaining ties through the Southwest Vacations unit.

Today, however, the company officially changed its tune in a telling press release.

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Q&A: Separating Business from Personal Politics

In case you missed it, venture capitalist/Silicon Valley money guru and Y Combinator founder Paul Graham–who helped startups like Dropbox and Airbnb achieve their impressive valuations–received a bit of negative attention from others in the tech scene over the past week for tweeting news stories about the Gaza conflict currently dominating headlines around the world. Here’s an example:

The tweets didn’t go over well with some Israeli members of the tech world. VC and sometime TechCrunch writer Roi Carthy wrote a blog post protesting Graham’s tweets and announcing his decision to stop working with Y Combinator in Israel. He spoke to Kevin Roose of New York magazine and compared Graham’s actions to those of Brendan Eich, who resigned as CEO of Mozilla after reports revealed his donations to the anti-gay marriage Prop 8 campaign:

“Due to mandatory army service, the tech industry and the army in Israel are intertwined…If you don’t recognize that, you shouldn’t be doing business with Israelis.”

The question: how can executives and other public figures avoid this potentially toxic meeting of politics and industry thought leadership?

We spoke to Stan Steinreich, CEO of Steinreich Communications, for his take.

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‘Distruptive’ Startups Refine Their Strategies for Working with Regulators

airbnbAirbnb’s executives have decided that the free market doesn’t trump the law and that the rules do apply to them after all.

The details have been reported elsewhere, but the decision is a big deal for startups (and their investors/promoters) that might eventually run up against those pesky things we call legal regulations.

The big questions to be answered–and the ones that most concern these startups’ advisory and PR teams–are “how should ’distruptive’ businesses be regulated” and “what’s the best way for them to work within/around existing regulations?”

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Yes, Wall Street Still Has a Big Perception Problem

Got 15 minutes to spare? Listen to this NPR ”Planet Money” clip in which New York magazine financial writer Kevin Roose gives us a hint as to why the insular world of big finance no longer appeals to Ivy League MBAs as much as it used to. In short, The Social Network is this generation’s Wall Street.


Roose says:

“The sex appeal is in Silicon Valley now. It has the…cultural cachet that Wall Street used to have…the tech industry is making things…”

That’s a key insight: tech makes things while Wall Street “re-bundles” things—at least according to popular opinion.

Younger bankers want to change all that. While all evidence indicates that the old generation is perfectly fine with being feared, the new generation “wants to be loved.”

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Can Bad E-Mail Etiquette Make for Better Pitches?

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According to New York magazine econ writer Kevin Roose’s new LinkedIn Influencers post, the answer is “probs :-/”

Roose begins by writing that Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel‘s casual emoji email response to Mark Zuckerberg didn’t just make him look “arrogant”. It also clarified that this was a conversation between equals: no “”Hope all’s well” or “love your company”—just a simple “Thanks :) would be happy to meet.”

The point is that Spiegel, in his own way, played hard to get and made himself more appealing by dialing down the excitement most startup CEOs would feel after receiving an email from the guy who founded Facebook. Instead of waxing reverent, Spiegel addressed Zuckerberg like he was just another West Coast tech guy in his 20s. Oh, wait…

It’s the rare exception that proves the “adopt a formal tone in business comms” rule, but Roose notes that it can also apply to PR pitches.

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Will Instagram’s New Messaging Service Be a Useful Promo Tool?

In a direct attempt to fight off challengers like Snapchat, Instagram announced today that it would launch a new “direct messaging” service that allows users to send pics to one another. New York mag’s Kevin Roose writes that it means you can now “annoy specific, targeted friends with your brunch Instagrams“, but there might be a little more to it than that.

The feature would have been its own app, but parent company Facebook wanted to empower users to share images, aka “moments”, without adding them to the main feed or downloading any completely new apps. Our first thought was that we could use the new feature to send this image of a perfectly named but sadly defunct local business to the very few people who would appreciate it.

Screen Shot 2013-12-12 at 12.47.45 PM

But then we realized that everyone loves I Want a Breast Pump, because “It’s Doubley Good!!!

Seriously, though…

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Do Tech Blogs Give Free PR to Silicon Valley? Valleywag Says Yes.

A couple of months ago New York magazine’s economics writer Kevin Roose asked whether tech journalists are generally afraid to write “objectively” and/or criticize their subjects. In other words, do the sites reporting on Silicon Valley residents—from Google-sized giants to tiny dorm-room startups—simply rework press releases penned by the companies they cover?

Interesting question; for one site, the answer is a resounding “yes.”

In a New York Times interview, blogger Sam Biddle of Gawker Media’s “tech industry gossip dartboard” Valleywag states that his goal is to make light of the digital world’s “lack of self-awareness” in the midst of so much overwhelmingly positive publicity. He specifically says that many other sites “[do] the bidding of the industry” they cover by hyping every single product rollout as the greatest thing since electricity and refusing to cast any related “thought leaders” in a less-than-flattering light.

Sounds a little dramatic, but he may be onto something here…

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