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Posts Tagged ‘Marissa Mayer’

Perez Hilton, Other Famous People Had Thoughts on Advertising Week

Seeing Perez Hilton at Advertising Week is kind of like seeing Kid Rock at Cannes or the Kardashians at Paris Fashion Week: you get why they’re hanging around, but you wonder who invited them.

Nonetheless, quite a few names-you-might-know showed up at a red carpet event sponsored by social networking service Keek and agreed to talk for a few seconds about the state of things.

Here’s Mashable founder Pete Cashmore on management:

Perez and more after the jump…

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Former WH Chief Defends Powerful Women Appearing in ‘Women’s Magazines’

MICHELLE-OBAMA-VOGUE-COVER-570

You may have noticed a not-so-recent trend: powerful women in politics, technology and other fields appearing on the covers of magazines like Vogue and Cosmopolitan as they make major career transitions.

Unfortunately, these very women often receive a steady drumbeat of criticism after making such appearances. This doesn’t just apply to politics, either–remember Marissa Mayer‘s 2013 cover shoot?

Last week, Marie Claire’s newest contributing editor Alyssa Mastromonaco finally stood up to defend the practice in The Washington Post with the simple headline “Being informed and fashionable is natural for women.

Mastromonaco is more qualified than most to comment on this topic: she spent six years as President Obama’s White House Deputy Chief of Staff.

We’ll review what she wrote after the jump.

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Bloggers Unimpressed by Yahoo’s New Tech Site for ‘Normals,’ AKA Idiots

Oh look, it’s former NYT techie and current Yahoo Hater of Buzzwords David Pogue making fun of tech blogs’ names and calling out their writers’ headlines as prime offenders in the “meaningless jargon” category. Are you shocked to learn that they weren’t too impressed with his presentation yesterday?

Marissa Mayer clearly wants to reinvent Yahoo as a tech news company for the average browser, what with the elaborate roll-out and the middle-of-the-road Katie Couric appointment, but so far the established tech world is dubious.

Let’s check out Pogue’s introductory Yahoo Tech post to see what this is all about.

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Pantene Spot Highlights Double Standards for Women in the Business World

We’ve heard a few too many covers of “Mad World”, but we still like this new BBDO Pantene Philippines ad—and we have a feeling cultural critic Rashida Jones would approve.

While the promo doesn’t concern the overly aggressive sexuality used to sell pop culture, it does highlight another double standard that may be even more important: the different ways in which our society views men and women in the workplace. You’ve encountered these themes before; they form the basis for Sheryl Sandberg‘s controversial hit Lean In.

Consider two recent examples after the jump.

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Google This: Yahoo Is Number One Among Search Engines

Yahoo-v-GoogleCheck your monitor. Reboot the computer. Pick it up and shake it like an Etch-a-Sketch. You read that headline correctly. According to comScore Media Metrix, online shopping — from back-to-school to coupon clipping — saw a considerable spike in Q2. Yeah for retailers, but the headline is yeah for…Yahoo? 

September marked the third month in a row that Yahoo claimed the first position, this time at 197,774 unique visitors to Yahoo sites from desktop devices. This is up from August at 196,432. I don’t know if it’s that flashy not-so-new logo or the CEO’s wannabe Maxim cover story, but there it is. Yahoo trumping the almighty Google.

Who woulda thunk it? In an interview with Forbes, that would be comScore VP of industry analysis Andrew Lipsman. 

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Marissa Mayer Defends Her Vogue Shoot

It wasn't THAT BAD. Come on.

So Marissa Mayer‘s Vogue shoot raised quite a few eyebrows last month. Unfortunately, no one discussed anything she said in the accompanying interview—the questions that followed were all variations on “Is it appropriate for a female executive to appear in a fashion spread?”, with the web’s many master debaters wondering whether she’d somehow lost a bit of her dignity and/or credibility by doing so.

At an Ad Week forum yesterday, she had a chance to “explain” the shoot to Charlie Rose, who likes to interview many famous people when not guest-starring on Breaking Bad.

She reminded him that the famous shot above did not appear on the mag’s cover before describing how staffers gave her a choice of outfits (she chose the blue because she doesn’t wear black). Turns out the photographer encouraged her to lie down on the lounge because he wouldn’t stand for “prim ‘First Lady-like’ shots”, so it really wasn’t the big-name CEO equivalent of a “sexy selfie.”

When asked about those pesky gender issues, she replied “I really don’t feel it”, which is a more polite way of saying “Let me run my company and stop making a big freaking deal over the fact that I happen to be female, FFS”. When telling Rose why she never reads her own press coverage she said “I know who I am, I know what I like, and I have a clear view of what I want Yahoo to be.”

Not sure about you guys, but we like her a little more now.

Most Major Industries Are Lacking in Female Leaders…But Not PR

Everyone with an internet connection knows about the lack of strong, highly visible female executives in the tech world. There’s a reason Sheryl Sandberg and Marissa Mayer stand out so prominently, and the recent firing of Business Insider‘s CTO for posting misogynistic musings on Twitter led many tech bloggers to reflect on the “bro culture” that dominates Silicon Valley.

It’s not just tech, though. The snafu over publisher Bryan Golbderg’s new “female-focused” web magazine Bustle showed that the media/journalism world still disproportionately consists of men catering to female audiences despite the prominence of names like Arianna Huffington and Tina Brown. In September, a software project created by an MIT grad student to measure the presence of women in journalism found a general lack of female voices in traditional media even though a majority of readers (and bloggers) are women.

When we saw yesterday’s New York Times headline about “a lack of women in top jobs” on a list meant to celebrate the most powerful women in banking, our first thought was: what about PR?

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Yahoo! Goes Sans-Serif, Earns Media Coverage with Classic Marketing Tricks

Well, then: Yahoo! (don’t forget the exclamation mark) sure got the media excited to report on…nothing this morning. OK, maybe not nothing, but certainly nothing newsworthy.

In the latest stage of its Marissa Mayer-era rebranding adventure, your grandma’s favorite browser homepage unveiled its new (still purple) colors and went about trying to convince everyone to get excited. We have to admire their tenacity, because while no one seems particularly impressed with the site’s new duds, we’re all still talking about the rollout.

Slow clap.

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Why Yahoo’s Summly Acquisition Was a PR Stunt

Photo via Suzanne Plunkett/REUTERSYou may have heard today that Yahoo, which is in the midst of trying to “sex up” its brand image, just bought Summly, a “news summary” app created by a 17-year-old British kid named Nick D’Aloisio, for a whopping $30 million. But was Yahoo really expanding its product portfolio, or was the company just buying a bunch of good publicity? We’re firmly in the latter camp — and we’ll explain why.

The real value of this app has to be less than the selling price, especially when it faces competitors like Pulse, Flipboard and Pocket. But the move scored the company a first-page New York Times story with the headline “He Has Millions and a New Job at Yahoo. Soon, He’ll Be 18.” Compelling, no? He’s bold, he’s young and he’s a millionaire with his own Wikipedia page. He certainly doesn’t sound like the typical Yahoo user — and that’s the whole point. New York Magazine’s Kevin Roose notes that the last acquisition to get this much media hype was Facebook buying Instagram for a whole lot more money.

So it’s all part of Marissa Mayer‘s carefully planned image makeover.

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Yahoo on ‘Work from Home’ Controversy: Mind Your Own Business

Marissa MayerLast night Yahoo issued a belated response to The New York Times on the totally unnecessary “no telecommuting, ever” controversy by releasing a statement that effectively read “Mind your own business; this doesn’t apply to you.”

The brand spokesperson’s words:

“This isn’t a broad industry view on working from home. This is about what is right for Yahoo right now.”

That’s it. No further elaboration, because “We don’t discuss internal matters”. A little translation via inside sources: Marissa Mayer “is in crisis mode” trying to fix the malfunctioning culture of a company that until recently sponsored “work from home” policies loose enough to allow employees to launch startups while still technically working for Yahoo full time.

Yahoo clearly doesn’t want to take part in the larger debate about telecommuting, internal cohesion and working mothers. One thing is clear, though: anyone who doubted that the company’s culture is in serious trouble can now rest assured that the rumors are true.

Also: Here’s an interesting post on the subject from KMSPR CEO Kathleen Schmidt. She argues that, while the “blanket memo” was not a great idea, this “controversy” is really all about the fact that Mayer happens to be a woman–and many in the corporate world would applaud a similar decision coming from a male executive.

What do we think?

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