TVNewser Show TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Meet the Press’

5 Tips for Keeping Your Message Clear and On-Point

“If you have to backtrack, you need to ask yourself, why did you put it out there in the first place?” That’s what Lizz Winstead, co-creator of The Daily Show, would like to know. She was speaking about being funny on Twitter at an event last month, but her question addresses a broader issue: more celebrities and brands have had to backtrack recently after making controversial comments on various media platforms.

We’re referring to statements or tweets that veer off message, not major blunders that require full-scale apology tours. These foot-in-mouth comments and retractions occur so frequently that the Plain English Campaign established a Foot in Mouth award to highlight “a baffling comment by a public figure”. Mitt Romney lost his presidential bid, but he won the award last year.

With so much material to choose from, we took a closer look to better understand the dynamics. The selected faux pas highlighted below serve as cautionary tales of how easy it is for messages to go awry and reminders to avoid that happening.

1. Being too authentic can cause real trouble. Former Boston Red Sox player Kevin Youkilis, acquired by the Yankees during the off-season, said “I’ll always be a Red Sock” during an early spring training interview. It’s clear that he meant what he said, since he has strong Boston ties. (New England Patriots QB Tom Brady is his brother-in-law). Youkilis’ problem was speaking his true feelings without first hitting the pause button to consider his new team’s reaction.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Storytelling for Media Professionals

Storytelling for Media ProfessionalsStarting April 22, this in-person workshop will teach you the specific ways to incorporate storytelling into your personal and professional life. Students will examine the role of storytelling in business and put their newfound skills into practice with a series of improvisation, writing, and presentation exercises designed to help them uncover personal stories. Register now! 

NBC Uses News Shows to Promote Sitcoms

NBC's 1600 PennVia our sister site TVNewser, we bring you an ethics debate: NBC has now used its “editorial” news shows Rock Center, Today and Meet the Press to promote its upcoming White House sitcom 1600 Penn. (Well, OK, it was the Meet the Press web channel if you want to get all technical, but the clip will still appear on some affiliates.)

We understand the network’s need to go all out to promote its newest property. Now that The Voice is over, NBC is pretty much guaranteed to drop back into its perennial loser status among the big networks.

Still, we have to ask: is the network crossing a line by hyping the show on its supposedly serious editorial programs? Joe Flint at the Los Angeles Times thinks so:

To be sure, the idea of media companies making use of their platforms to advertise their own assets and personalities is nothing new. ABC’s Good Morning America has no qualms about using its valuable time to talk about Dancing With the Stars.

But NBC is becoming the most aggressive in doing this and if it continues it could harm the credibility of its news division.

Crazy idea, but maybe news programming should be kept to news.

What do we think? Does NBC risk harming the credibility of its news division with this kind of everywhere-all-at-once promotion? What’s their marketing team so afraid of, anyway?

Omaze Turns the Charity Model on Its Head

The non-profit business model is timeless: Celebrities and other well-to-do individuals identify a personal cause and encourage fans and followers to get involved–but the whole venture runs on the large donations of the fortunate few.

While Matt Pohlson and Ryan Cummins were still in business school, they attended a charity event that inspired them to change that equation altogether. The two classmates would have loved the opportunity to play basketball with Magic Johnson, but the price on the play date was a prohibitive $15,000. The incident got them thinking about a new way of running a charity venture–by expanding the playing field to include all interested parties.

Now they bring us Omaze, a project that offers fans “the chance to win once-in-a-lifetime experiences that also support social missions.”

Omaze is no small-time operation: past partners include Lady Gaga, Modern Family, the Broadway musical Rock of Ages, Meet the Press and the cast of Glee. Here’s the kicker: the required donation for participants is only five dollars. That’s right, for five bucks the super-fan can enter to win the chance to hang out with the cast of his/her favorite show…and support a worthwhile charity in the process!

How are they able to run a successful operation on the strength of such tiny donations?

Read more

Mayor Cory Booker Facing Backlash Over Inoffensive Comments

Newark Mayor Cory Booker made some pretty benign statements on Meet The Press yesterday and today it’s the big political story.

After MTP host David Gregory showed a clip of an Obama ad that debuted last week in which steel workers say Bain Capital is responsible for the shutdown of the mill they worked for, Gregory opened the discussion to the roundtable, which included Mayor Booker. Throughout his comments Mayor Booker talks up the accomplishments of President Obama’s administration, the support that his policies have generated, and the need for President Obama to emphasize his positive record.

But he also said he’s not going to “indict” public equity, doesn’t completely bash Bain Capital, and says that the negative campaigning on both sides is “nauseating” to him and now he’s the “surrogate from hell” for the Obama administration.

Read more

Limbaugh Apology Doesn’t Squash Contraception Coverage Controversy

Rush Limbaugh has issued a fake apology for the vile statements he made on his radio program Wednesday night. During his show, he called Georgetown Law student Sandra Fluke (and, by extension, it would seem, any woman who supports the contraception coverage effort) a “prostitute” and a “slut.” Limbaugh says he “did not mean a personal attack on Ms. Fluke,” that he was trying to be “humorous,” yadda yadda, insincere bunk.

Immediately following his disgusting commentary, Democratic Congress members expressed their outrage, calling for Republican members to denounce the statements. But it looks like the calls from six advertisers to cancel their contracts prompted the contrition.

This morning on Meet the Press, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (VA) tried to tamp down the issue by reminding David Gregory a couple of times that Limbaugh has apologized and, yes, he personally thinks the comments were wrong.

But Limbaugh has opened up a can of worms that he and the GOP may regret for a looong time.

Read more