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Posts Tagged ‘music’

‘Rico Suave’ Says Womanizing Is ‘Expected’ in His Culture

gerardo

An old, tired cliche holds that “there’s truth in every stereotype.”

Maybe. But there is no excuse for making generalizations about an entire sociological grouping of very different people. None.

No matter how hard someone tries to paint everyone with the same brush, there is always an exception to every rule. For that reason, we shouldn’t be surprised when some 90s one-hit-wonder tries to say that his “culture” expects him to treat women like slabs of meat…and gets slammed for it on social media.

Isn’t that right, Mr. Gerardo “Rico Suave” Mejia? Read more

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Mediabistro Job FairLand your next big gig! Join us on January 27 at the Altman Building in New York City for an incredible opportunity to meet with hiring managers from the top New York media companies, network with other professionals and industry leaders, and land your next job. Register now!

Of Mice and Men: Disney Prevents Deadmau5 From Trademarking Two Peculiar Ears

mickey_mouse_vs_deadmau5

From the “What in the world took so long” department, today brings us some legal ruminations via one successful trance music prodigy named Deadmau5. To his parents, the rodent-monikered dance hall wunderkind is Joel Zimmerman of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. To the rest of us, he wears a mouse head and two digitally enhanced ears.

For more than a decade, this has been Zimmerman’s shtick — he shows up in concert, never to be seen sans mouse head, and plays his curly tail off. Oh sure, there is a stark similarity between his outfit and that of another notable mouse, but nothing has been said. Not once, until now.

Finally.

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How the Music Industry Brainwashes Us to Like Songs We (Rightfully) Hate

dd914540-a3ff-11e3-8aeb-b5427b31fc45_Iggy-Azalea-Fancy-PollThe first time I heard Iggy Azalea’s “Fancy,” I loathed it, like wouldn’t-get-through-30-seconds-before-I-changed-the-station loathed it. But here I am in August, a few months after the song’s release, and I find that while I still truly do not enjoy the song, my resolve to burn it out of my mind and all existence has weakened, and I no longer feel the overwhelming need to leap out a third-story window if it suddenly comes on while out with friends.

As it turns out, there’s a real, neurological reason for my surrender, and it’s one the music industry uses to its full advantage — think of it like Stockholm Syndrome, but auditory — and the kidnapper with whom you slowly grow to sympathize is Katy Perry’s latest auto-tuned nightmare.

The phenomenon was revealed in an fMRI study, which suggested that repeated exposure to a song is actually a more effective means of winning the hearts of the public than writing a song that they might actually like. This is because the emotional centers of the brain are more active when a person hears a song he or she has heard previously than when hearing an unfamiliar song that better suits the person’s musical taste. It seems our brains confuse the ability to recognize and remember a song with actually enjoying it. Read more

#PRFail: Prince Sues 22 Fans for $1 Million … Each

symbol sues

The Symbol is about to ‘Purple Rain’ all over someone’s parade. 

FULL DISCLOSURE: Prince is a certifiable genius and I own all of his music. That said, the dude is also a certifiable guest in one of those padded cells with the cutesy little jackets that buckles in the back.

Prince is known for writing amazing tunes, wearing ass-less chaps, indulging in omnisexual freakishness, and hating the Internet. That vitriol comes in response to people bootlegging “His Royal Badness’” tunes via the technology of said Interweb. To wit, Prince Rogers Nelson (who knew) is suing 22 of his fans for one millllllllllllllllllion dollars.

There’s more in the suit after the jump…

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Muzak Faces the (Lame) Music, Rebrands as ‘Mood Media’

You know someone’s got the branding game down when the public sees the name of the product and the company that makes the product as interchangeable. Examples include Ziploc, Kleenex, Tylenol…and the sadly defunct Muzak.

We don’t know about you guys, but every time we encounter that particularly lame genre of light, mostly instrumental tunes heard in elevators, doctors’ offices and pharmacies around the world, the word “Muzak” comes to mind.

Yet Mood Media, the “multi-sensory marketing/brand marketing/neuromarketing”(!) agency that bought the struggling company in 2011, recently decided to put the name down for good. Why?

The agency’s CEO acknowledges that the decision marks the “end of an iconic American brand”–and that’s just the problem. He told The New York Times that Muzak “is often perceived as an epithet for elevator music”, implying that the public would be more likely to dismiss Mood Media altogether if it retained the Muzak name.

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PR Win: Gibson Replaces Guitar Destroyed on Delta Flight

Gibson GuitarsAs proud amateur musicians, we understand the importance of a treasured instrument–especially a premium electric guitar worth thousands of dollars.

Today we came across the story of a musician who nearly lost his six-string in transit and experienced two completely opposite reactions from the brands involved: Delta Airlines and Gibson Guitars. Can you guess who comes out looking better in this case?

Dave Schneider, who fronts a couple of bands we don’t think we’ve ever heard, always carried his 1965 Gibson (estimated value $10,000) onboard when flying because he didn’t trust others to handle it–and he was right to be worried. When Delta employees forced him to check it on a flight from Buffalo, New York to Detroit, he got paranoid and started filming with his iPhone as soon as the plane landed.

As you’ll see from this video, the guitar got stuck in an elevator at the airport, destroying the case and seriously damaging the instrument inside. Bad news.

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Spotify Isn’t Making Any Money

Chances are you’re familiar with Spotify. You’ve probably even used it a few times—and if you registered you’ve almost certainly started seeing status updates every single time one of your friends listens to a damn song! Wow that’s annoying. (All you have to do to stop that nonsense is change the settings on your account, but we digress.)

Spotify is a pretty cool service in some ways. It’s given us a chance to access obscure music whenever we want without buying anything; we just have to either pony up a paltry $9.99 a month or listen to some stupid ads between every two or three tracks. And we don’t have to feel guilty about using it because we’re not stealing the music we hear. All good, right?

Not really. The problem is that, despite the Facebook bromance and potential relationships with big-name sponsors like Coca-Cola and Samsung, Spotify’s business model doesn’t seem to be working. In fact, their net income for 2011 was negative $60 million. That’s a whole lot of iTunes downloads, guys.

The funny thing is that the main factor dragging the company’s earnings down is the cost of royalties—in spite of the fact that the artists and labels who produced the music in question make less than 5/1000 of a penny for each play—less than any other comparable service.

Our question: Why is Spotify Premium so cheap in the first place? Wouldn’t most hardcore music fans pay more than 10 bucks a month for unlimited streaming content?

Does Spotify need a re-branding or what?