TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Osama bin Laden’

Hollywood Pushes Back Against Zero Dark Thirty Critics

Zero Dark ThirtyWe haven’t seen Zero Dark Thirty yet, but we are intrigued by the PR back-and-forth between the film’s makers/promoters and various members of the US government. A couple of questions are central to the controversy:

  • Does the film glorify torture and imply that information gained during torture sessions eventually led to the location and assassination of Osama bin Laden?
  • Did the filmmakers act inappropriately in collecting information from confidential sources within the Central Intelligence Agency?

This is a bi-partisan issue; California Democrat Dianne Feinstein and Arizona Republican John McCain both voiced concern over the fact that the movie might lead Americans to see “enhanced interrogation” as an acceptable element of the US military’s intelligence arsenal. The conversation grew so heated that director Kathryn Bigelow found the need to release a public statement calling herself a “lifelong pacifist”, disavowing the use of torture and reminding everyone in the media that retweets do not equal endorsements. The senators have also sent a letter to the acting director of the CIA asking for more information in terms of the filmmakers’ discussions with members of the agency’s intelligence community.

Now the pushback on behalf of ZDT is growing stronger–and it’s an interesting case from a PR perspective.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Social Media 101

Social Media 101Get hands-on social media training in our online boot camp, Social Media 101! Starting September 4, social media and marketing experts will help you determine the social media sites that matter most to you, based on your personal and professional goals. Register now! 

Al-Qaida Spokesperson Discusses His Media Strategy

Among the 6,000-plus pages of documents that were gathered during the operation that killed Osama bin Laden is a letter from al-Qaida spokesperson Adam Gadahn written in January 2011 in which he goes into a detailed assessment of American media outlets.

“As for the neutrality of CNN in English, it seems to be in cooperation with the government more than the others (except Fox News of course),” Gadahan writes to an unknown recipient. The letter was one of many released by the Combating Terrorism Center yesterday.

He goes on to say that MSNBC “may be” objective, but he’s bothered by the network’s decision to fire Keith Olbermann and Octavia Nasser for expressing their opinions; 60 Minutes has a good reputation; and ABC could be “one of the best channels” because it heavily promoted an interview with “the Shaykh.”

The letter continues:

Read more

Bin Laden Considered Renaming al-Qaida, According to Recovered Documents

Osama the Jihadist. Osama the Terrorist. Osama the Marketer.  Taking a page from the crisis handbook of corporations under extreme stress, Osama bin Laden considered renaming al-Qaida, according to writings retrieved during a raid on the compound in which he was killed last month.  It had become just too…well, you know.  Bad.  And not anti-American enough.

What happened to the AQ is the entire world dropped the second half of the full name of the terrorist org:  al-Qaida al-Jihad.  Acc0rding to the undated letter recovered from the compound, lopping off the second part allowed the West to “claim deceptively that they are not at war with Islam.”  One option was simply the Jihad Group.  As if it were a hedge fund, or a publicly traded company.

Read more

Decision Not to Release Bin Laden Photos Sparking Debate

WH Press Secretary Jay Carney

During a briefing today, White House Press Secretary Jay Carney repeated and reiterated the President’s decision not to release postmortem photos of Osama bin Laden or his burial at sea.

Carney read the quotes today, taken from President Obama’s upcoming interview with 60 Minutes.

“It is important for us to make sure that very graphic photos of somebody who was shot in the head are not floating around as an incitement to additional violence. I think that, given the graphic nature of these photos, it would create some national security risk,” Carney said. Mediaite has the full video with Carney’s statement. Talking Points Memo notes that Carney is working to tone down and correct some of the conflicting details that have been disclosed.

Read more

Bin Laden Hits the Big Screen

Osama: Slytherin, most definitely

It took 10 years for U.S. forces to track down Osama bin Laden, but only hours for Hollywood to start planning movie versions.

An agent for former Navy Seal sniper Howard Wasdin, whose yet-to-be-released memoir SEAL Team Six documents his time with the elite counterterrorism unit that shot Bin Laden, says he’s already had several offers for a movie adaptation.

And (perhaps inconveniently) the terrorist’s death provides The Hurt Locker‘s Kathryn Bigelow and Mark Boal with a new, solid ending to their already-in-the-works thriller (working title: based in part on “a Delta Force commander’s” 2008 memoir Kill Bin Laden), about a U.S. special ops team on the hunt for bin Laden in Tora Bora.

Read more

Bin Laden News Takes Its Place in Social Media History

A graph of the spike in page views surrounding the news of bin Laden's death.

Last Friday, the Internet strained under the weight of all the interest in the Royal Wedding. Over the past 18 hours or so, the Internet has once again been tested by the news of Osama bin Laden’s death.

CNN says 4,000 tweets per second were posted at the peak of the news, putting it at the same level as the number of tweets for the Super Bowl but well below the number of tweets sent around the earthquake in Japan (more than 6,000). And according to Twitter PR, it was the “highest sustained rate of tweets ever,” with 5,106 tweets per second sent at 11 p.m. ET.”

(Latest Twitter news: TechCrunch announces that Twitter will purchase Tweetdeck.)

Read more

Mixed Opinions About Impact of Bin Laden News on Obama’s Public Perception

A spontaneous crowd celebrates the news about Osama bin Laden's demise in downtown Manhattan. Photo: EPA

Journalists are taking a look at the Osama bin Laden news and trying to determine the benefits to President Obama as we head into the next election.

So soon after rejoicing crowds have taken to the streets in New York and Washington D.C., high favor for Obama is coming from all directions.

“[Obama's] world view is often challenged by his Republican rivals, who seek to portray him as a weak leader. That line of attack will almost certainly be more difficult to use as he begins running for a second term,” writes The New York Times.

Read more

Twitter Takes the Lead on Bin Laden News

NYC firefighters get the news about bin Laden's death via Times Square ticker. Photo: Michael Appleton for The New York Times

Twitter took a lead role in breaking the news last night that Osama bin Laden had been killed by U.S. forces in Abbottabad, Pakistan. In stories this morning, many report hearing the news first via tweet. Keith Urbahn, former chief of staff to former defense secretary Donald Rumsfeld, is reported (by CNET and others) as the first reliable source to report on Twitter that bin Laden was dead.

Prior to that, White House comms director Dan Pfeiffer tweeted that President Obama would be making an announcement at 10:30 p.m. Even before that, Sohaib Athar, who goes by the name @ReallyVirtual, tweeted about hearing helicopters overhead in Abbottabad, “a rare event,” he wrote. Mashable says that he was actually tweeting the raid on bin Laden’s compound.

Forbes also has an interesting story about Twitter’s scoop and the impact it’s having on news and other areas. And Gigaom breaks down the “seven stages of news” in the social media age.