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Posts Tagged ‘Snapchat’

Snapchat Wants to Make Your Money Disappear

…but they’re not going to keep it, silly!

Last night we saw the first “official” ad for Snapchat’s new cash-transferral service called Snapcash. Tell us if it makes any sense to you:

Unfortunately, this clip won’t disappear after ten seconds.

Still confused? Don’t worry — the company explained very little about the new product and its revised privacy policy in a pair of what we might call press releases.

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Will New, ‘Private’ Networks Threaten the Social Media Establishment?

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The big story in social right now concerns privacy…or the lack thereof. As Twitter sues the U.S. government over data collection and Facebook announces plans to release an “anonymity” app, other networks have attempted to use the controversy to get attention.

Ello is the obvious one; brands, “influencers” and bored users making fun of the same have already begun joining the “ad-free” network. Snapchat still says it’s more private than its competitors despite admitting that those initial claims weren’t quite accurate and agreeing to “start a wide-ranging privacy program that will be independently monitored for 20 years.”

Then there’s Netropolitan, “the online country club for people with more money than time” (yes, that is a real tagline).

So: coveted headlines aside, can these upstarts really threaten the Twitter/Facebook monopoly?

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Top Google Comms Exec Heads to Snapchat

Jill HazelbakerSeems Snapchat was well aware of its own shortcomings on the messaging front: the not-quite-disappearing message app company has hired Jill Hazelbaker, former senior director of corporate comms and government relations at Google.

In confirming the change this morning, Re\code notes that Snapchat didn’t exactly announce it publicly — nor did the company send out formal press releases when it hired Facebook veteran Sara Sperling to run its HR department last month.

Hazelbaker’s responsibilities will presumably include helping the increasingly mis-categorized “startup” manage its messaging efforts and minimize unflattering press as it continues to expand.

Interesting things to note about Hazelbaker: prior to joining Google, she worked in politics on the center-right side of the aisle, serving as senior advisor to New York mayor Michael Bloomberg when he ran for a third term and directing national communications for Senator John McCain’s 2007-2008 presidential campaign.

She’s also never tweeted, though she does follow Henry Blodget…

10 Brands That Tried to Newsjack the #AppleLive Event

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Different brands used yesterday’s Apple product launch in different ways: Samsung ran sponsored tweets to try and draw attention away from its competitor while Snapchat took the opportunity to ensure that a very unflattering press release received as little attention as possible.

Quite a few brands, however, saw it as an opportunity for some not-quite-real-time marketing to try and break through the 2.4 million tweets about the event.

They entered the social conversation with varying degrees of success (in no particular order).

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Snapchat Makes Bad News Disappear in Six Seconds

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So did you hear Snapchat‘s big announcement yesterday? No? You’re not the only one — and there’s a good reason for that.

History’s frattiest startup confirmed yesterday that its third founding partner did, in fact, play a significant role in creating its app. By settling with “Reggie” Brown for what we can only assume was a multi-million dollar sum, the company effectively admitted that it had cut him out of the loop before hitting the big time and dissing Mark Zuckerberg.

The official statement from CEO Evan Spiegel goes against Snapchat’s years of official denials, in which it claimed that Brown had little to do with the company’s creation, launch and subsequent success:

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Snapchat Admits That It Made Up All That ‘Privacy’ Stuff

snapchatWe’ve known for some time that Snapchat‘s privacy claims don’t quite add up, and today the network and the Federal Trade Commission have reached an agreement on that point.

What does this mean? Basically, Evan Spiegel and company will officially admit that snaps don’t really “disappear forever” (they never did) and that recipients may, in fact, preserve the images/clips indefinitely in several ways without letting the sender know.

Here’s the big one: in addition to the false claims about disappearing snaps, the company also copped to collecting and transmitting user data despite claims to the contrary–and its recent security breach theoretically allowed hackers to collect that data.

Sound familiar?

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World Wildlife Federation Finds Another Use for Snapchat

Last week we discussed why Snapchat might be the future of content marketing with ICED Media president Leslie Hall.

In case you’re still skeptical, here’s a very clever campaign from the World Wildlife Federation Denmark and agencies UncleGrey (Denmark) and 41? 29! (Turkey) that combines a few topical elements: a traditional video clip, selfies, hashtags, the temporary nature of Snapchats and the emotional components that make content sharable.

While the campaign might not directly encourage fundraising, it’s certainly a creative use of the medium.

[H/T PSFK]

Brand Moves: Audi Snaps Into Action and E*TRADE Scraps the Cheeky Baby

Audi Snapchat Dog Courtesy of HUGEBeing a brand that’s witty, irreverent or challenges convention isn’t so easy, especially since those companies set the bar high and their customers come to expect unique, creative ads and social communications. Two such brands, Audi and E*TRADE, shared their stories at Ad Age’s Digital Conference this week in New York. Audi detailed their use of Snapchat during the Super Bowl game, and E*TRADE discussed their decision to end their popular baby ad campaign.

Audi picks up the pace: “Being a challenger brand gives us an edge”, said Anna Russell, Audi’s general manager of brand marketing. She outlined the car brand’s core messages: they’re “champions of progress”, using LED lighting, they “challenge convention”, particularly with their Quattro system, and they’re a “brand of action” and frequent sports sponsor.

Still, as Aaron Shapiro, CEO of their agency, HUGE, noted, with the Oreo effect, “now every brand is piling on no matter how relevant or not” in real-time marketing during events. He said Audi didn’t want to use a “me-too strategy”. (Plus, they needed to be careful since they were involved in a 2010 Super Bowl campaign controversy).

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STUDY: 50% of Kids Use Social Media Before They Turn 10

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This is alternately informative and disturbing: a new study by UK Internet safety non-profit Knowthenet found that a majority of children begin using social media before they even turn ten years old.

The top networks they use, in order: Facebook, WhatsApp, BBM (it’s a British thing) and Snapchat. So maybe our society is a little too social? Also:

“The poll found 21 per cent of children had posted negative comments, starting from an average age of 11, and 26 per cent had ‘hijacked’ another person’s account and posted without permission.”

Pre-teen trolls? Now we’ve seen it all. There’s an infographic after the jump.

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STUDY: 5% of Millennials Check Their Phones Once a Minute

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Today in Things We Already Knew news: everyone accepts mobile as the future, but a recent British study* performed by “customer experience” brand KANA turned the why into science: the average Euro-Millennial aged 18-24 checks his or her phone every ten minutes…or every nine minutes and fifty seconds, to be precise.

More shocking was our headline stat: 1 in 20 respondents checks the phone an average of sixty times every waking hour.

You’re right to be curious about the generation gap: 25-34-year-olds only check their phones once every nine minutes and fifty-five seconds because 34 is the new 17, spoiled entitlement, blah blah. The number increases to once every 20 minutes or more once we cross the 35 threshold, but the trends still apply across demographics.

It’s almost as fascinating as oh hey, I got a Snapchat!

The key finding for PR, though, relates to customer service:

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