TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Spin Sucks’

The 25 (Other) PR Blogs You Should Bookmark Today

BlogHere at PRNewser, we (that’s this team right here) believe we have a sweet blog full of flack-y posts focusing on the PR perspectives behind current events.

We have a firm commitment to sharing stories and objectives along with a light dose of snark every now and then. That’s what got us thinking about other like-minded blogs that feature stories from across this sometimes-great industry of ours. And while this isn’t another edition of “5 Things,” it is a premium listicle.

Here are 25 (other) blogs all PR pros should bookmark.

They are listed in no particular order, but they do have a place in our folders. They should be in yours too.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Management 101

Management 101Become a better manager in our new online boot camp, Management 101! Starting October 27, MediabistroEDU instructors will teach you the best practices being a manager, including, how to transition into a management role, navigate different team personalities, plan a team event and more! Hurry, this boot camp starts Monday! Register now!

The Real Top 14 PR Twits to Follow in 2014

twitter-icon

Represent, “Real” PR Tweeps! 

We at PRNewser know that speaking out against clients (in the open) may be taboo. But for sake of discussion, let’s pretend it’s okay to be honest, mmmmkay?

How many times have you worked tirelessly for what seems like a millennium for a great trade story?

You earned a monstrous 90 percent share-of-voice with a sweet representation on social media to the tune of hundreds of shares, and even got noticed by other media types (local and industry). You draw up that report and hit enter with some righteous satisfaction (and possibly, a sister neck roll). And then, the client replies with … wait for it and repeat after me … “That’s all?” 

Yes you ungrateful so-and-so , metrics matter, but they have evolved. That’s how we feel about some of the “top minds” in this space making a list of “Who’s Who?” Metrics are important, as is attitude, content, engagement and relevance. That’s why this list—our list—matters. Here are our Top 14 PR Twits to Follow in 2014. 

*Snap Applause*

Read more

The Secret to Winning CSR: Become a Better Company

Wal Mart Hazardous Waste

We just read this month’s Harvard Business Review piece on corporate reputation by former Edelman vice chairman and Walmart corporate affairs VP Leslie Dach, and it’s  worth a glance if you haven’t seen it.

To summarize, Walmart struggled to improve its reputation with better messaging, but when Hurricane Katrina struck its team had something of an “aha” moment. “No internal debate was needed” because the team knew that mobilizing its resources to provide victims with food, emergency supplies and cash was simply “the right [thing] to do”. Afterward, the path forward became clearer—Walmart would seek out opportunities and set specific objectives in areas like sustainability and “women’s economic empowerment” in order to overcome bad press.

Read more

What Does the Publicis/Omnicom Merger Mean? (Part 2)

Yesterday we shared some of the many third-party predictions and analyses of the Publicis/Omnicom merger and what it will mean to the future of the advertising and marketing industries. To recap: On the financial front, industry revenue totals will probably stay steady—but the organization of the game will undoubtedly change.

The next question: what role will PR firms and professionals play in this new arrangement?

Richard Edelman believes that PR will act as “part of the supporting cast” in this ongoing soap opera in order to back up the newest and biggest players, Digital and Data. In other words (via The New York Times), it’s all about the mega-agencies chasing Google to reach more targeted users via Big Data number crunching.

Yet, despite this hyper-focus on math nerds, Edelman writes that individual “thought leader” voices within the PR industry will grow even more valuable as they bring crucial “small data” research and insights to the table that no Google analytics study can provide. Jack Marshall of Digiday even argues that the role of Big Data has been overstated because the numbers ultimately belong to clients, not agencies (and that the whole thing is really an accounting issue).

Back to our main query: how dramatic will the change be for PR?

Read more

What Does the Publicis/Omnicom Merger Mean?

We’ve all heard enough about this weekend’s Publicis/Omnicom merger to know that it’s too big for our limited minds to even fathom, much less evaluate.

So many questions followed: will it lead to mass layoffs or protracted battles over antitrust laws? Will it doom boutique agencies that don’t get picked up by major “holding company” conglomerates? Will it change our jobs in profound and permanent ways?

These are all valid, fascinating issues that must be considered—and for now we’ll let other people do the thinking for us, starting with those smartasses at The Onion.

Surprisingly accurate! That headline stings a bit, though we finally understand why they didn’t hire us for the grad school internship we wanted so badly (should’ve learned to code in high school, dammit). On a more serious note, Richard Edelman is skeptical of this supposed sea change, writing:

Bigger does not mean better. My 84-year-old mother’s first reaction yesterday was that this reminds her of AOL’s* merger with Time Warner. “They were all screwed up for years,” she said.

In other words, don’t freak out…at least not yet. But there will be blood.

Read more

PR Firm’s Copy and Paste Job Gets Client’s Site Blacklisted

Thanks to our friends at Arment Dietrich‘s Spin Sucks blog (follow them on Twitter!) and Andy Crestodina‘s book Content Chemistry for bringing us this story of terrible PR practices. In summary: A PR firm did the worst thing it possibly could have done in terms of Internet publicity, getting its own client’s website blacklisted from Google‘s search results by copying and pasting content from the client’s page into a press release and sending it out to thousands through online newswires.

The problem? Google’s search algorithm really hates duplicate content and looks to punish those who distribute it (for good reason) because, while providing your own spin on someone else’s content is acceptable, passing their work off as your own is not. So Google marked the company’s homepage as spam and removed it from all relevant search results. This story ended well only because the client’s web firm was able to file a request with Google explaining the PR team’s mistake.

The lesson here? Use SEO guidelines and write your own damn content! Don’t fall into this unnamed firm’s “do as little work as possible” stereotype!

PR ‘Jargon’ to Avoid When Pitching Journalists (With Helpful Suggestions!)

The headline got us immediately: Arment Dietrich CEO and Spin Sucks blogger Gini Dietrich promised to reveal the “worst PR jargon” as reported by more than 500 journalists, editors and correspondents who participated in UK PR firm 1238‘s annual “buzzword report.”

We don’t know that journalists are the impatient jerks they’re made out to be, but we’ve been on both sides of this equation, so we get it.

Now we don’t want to go all negative on you guys and scare you into writing bland pitches, so we thought we’d re-work it a bit: Here’s a list of words and phrases you should try (for the most part) to avoid in your pitch messages, along with some alternative suggestions that we hope are helpful.

Read more

What’s ‘Native Advertising’ All About, Anyway?

Native advertising: you’ve heard the term, and you’re going to hear it quite often in the months ahead. We haven’t directly addressed it on this blog yet, so here goes:

First: any web surfer will tell you that banner ads (aka “traditional paid media”) are on the way out. They do provide “impressions” or glances, but very few people actually click them.

A debate on the topic within the PR industry has all but resolved itself at this point: integrated or “native” spots created through “brand journalism” are part of the PR/marketing landscape along with “sponsored” tweets and the like. They’re here to stay, and PR teams need to start creating more of them ASAP or they’ll find themselves replaced by other third-party content creators and media buyers. (Here’s a great post on the issue from our friends at Spin Sucks.)

Right. But what does “native” mean, exactly? Well, this Mashable infographic made our heads hurt, so we’ll give you a better example: Check out The Awl, a sort of literary/culture blog that happens to be one of our favorite web destinations. Scroll down the page a bit and you’ll come across at least one post that looks slightly different than the rest (they’re usually hosted on a grey background and filed under the “sponsored stories” heading).

These are stories commissioned and created by brands like Pillsbury, HBO, Samsung, and the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. These brands (and the firms that represent them) want to court members of The Awl’s audience, and they came up with a good way to do so: create original content that complements the site’s existing stories.

It’s fairly simple, really:

Read more

Does PR Have a Creativity Problem?

Our friends at the excellent Spin Sucks blog asked a pointed question earlier this week:

“Will a lack of creativity be the demise of the PR industry?”

Given the fact that our business continues to grow while so many others struggle, we see the “demise” aspect of this headline as a rhetorical glimpse into the distant future. But it’s very interesting. Stated another way: Are PR and marketing professionals so scared of offending someone, anyone that they avoid all things colorful, interesting and remotely creative? And will dull, run-of-the-mill PR efforts grow so common as to negate the value of the service itself? Most companies can write their own press releases, right?

The post primarily concerned Pizza Hut’s recent PR controversy. To recap: The company offered a lifetime’s supply of pizza to anyone who would use last week’s “town hall” debate to ask the presidential candidates whether they prefer sausage or pepperoni. Quite a few feathers got ruffled, and Pizza Hut’s marketing reps quickly backed down, announcing that the campaign would move online as part of a “natural progression.”

Yet Forbes contributor Aaron Perlut called the campaign “brilliant” and claimed that its demise in the face of public outrage was a perfect example of the PR industry’s biggest flaw:

Read more