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Posts Tagged ‘technology’

It’s Official: Google Glass Is a Bust

Fashionable?

Even Shutterstock thinks so

For all the talk of tech in 2013, we can’t think of a single product that truly altered the landscape. Nothing came anywhere close to the innovation of, say, the iPad. Smart watches seemed mildly interesting, but the biggest “breakthrough” was supposed to be Google Glass.

After reading this Mat Honan Wired account of a year spent with the device, we can safely call it a dud. For now.

Key quotes after the jump.

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The Top 5 Responsible Reasons to Invest in Responsive Web Design

responsive-web-design

In a nutshell, this is the future … and the present of Web design. One URL + One code = Multiple devices with bridging content. Easy, right?

And if your clients are not aware of this, you may have some issues upselling, cross-selling or even selling them on the reason to stay with you in 2014. Your clients want to be seen everywhere and their clients find them anywhere. From tablet to smartphone, desktop to laptop, there needs to be a viable Web presence wherever you look.

Only that can get expensive right? Well, not if you understand Responsive Web Design, which basically embraces something called “second screen.” You know what so climatic about 2013 in the PR and Web world? This was the first year that more people searched for websites via mobile devices than a desktop computer (according to Morgan Stanley research, 2007 – 2015). The first and will ever be the same. Count on it.

So, how are you advising your clients? Waiting for the Web guys to do it for you? Yeah, that’s not going to work so get a pen and right down these five easy tips for your clients. They will thank you for it in the morning…

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The Over-Acronymization of PR (and 5 that need to go)

social-media-marketingMEMO to all those who mean the PR Newser team harm: Yes, “acronymization” is a word … now. 

Think about what you say on a daily basis at your job in PR, marketing, communications, social media, or some such. If you are like me, you abhor “Buzzword Bingo” and try to avoid it like a cold sore on a first date. However, you just can’t seem to escape the dreaded acronym that plagues this industry.

Think about it. They are everywhere, like a Kardashian only far less annoying. If they are online, you will offer clients abbreviations like “SEO,” “SEM,” “SMO,” and “SERP.” Go offline and you’re stuck there too with “B2B,” “B2C,” “CPG,” and “CTA.”

Meanwhile, I’m over thinking “WTF!”

Why do flacks, creatives and hybrids have to make everything an acronym? Do we sound more like a PR crackerjack when we barf initials out as if we are drunk on alphabet soup? Do you believe clients are so deftly impressed at your ability to summarize volumes of knowledge into three letters that have no business being together? Or, is it because you are just lazy as all get out?

Here is our list of top 5 industry acronyms that have to go…

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Hey, Ladies: Now You Really Can Make ‘The Girls’ Talk…or Tweet

Nestlé Tweeting Bra2In the classic American date movie Die Hard, Bruce Willis opined that “technology stopped with frozen pizza.”

After seeing this story on Mashable, we think he may be onto something – iPods, Pads and Phones notwithstanding, this is a cup of insanity.

This one goes out to the ladies [cue classic soul music and the lava lamp] as we introduce the Tweeting Bra.

[Record scratches. Lamp hardens and catches fire.]

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Did Google Maps Make Us Lose Our Minds?

The public can relax now. The Google Maps app is here, so we can all rest assured that we’ll know exactly where here is once again.

But that whole Apple maps debacle was scary, wasn’t it? Though we appreciate that Apple CEO Timothy Cook acknowledged the mistake and owned it, he left the public asking one collective, exasperated question: Where are we?

The public outcry over Apple’s failed attempt to replace the functional and beloved Google Maps revealed something very telling about people today: we’re no longer as resourceful as we once were. Though technology is designed to make our lives easier, it also has a way of disconnecting us from the real world.

When, exactly, did the public forget how to get from point A to point B? The Google Maps app, of course, is a godsend for those stubborn men who refuse to ask for directions, but when we no longer need the kindness and patience of a stranger to point us in the right direction (or the brainpower to establish our own bearings), we’re losing something as a society.

The iPhone’s ability to always let us know where we are has caused us to lose a sense of who we are.

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Crack the Code: Pitching Tech and Startup Stories

With the media echo chamber focusing on the same top tier tech companies, startups have a harder time getting noticed. But at least now your client’s company doesn’t have to be from Silicon Valley to gain media traction. New York’s own Silicon Alley has attracted increased attention from tech reporters, due in part to the success of startups such as foursquare and Fab.com. As Devindra Hardawar, national editor for VentureBeat, said, “Now what’s happening in New York has become fascinating.”

Hardawar appeared on a panel at a PCNY event on Tuesday that also included NYC-based editors and reporters covering the tech and startups beat from GigaOM, Mashable, Business Insider and WNYC’s New Tech City morning radio show. The event was a follow-up to a June PCNY panel centered on mobile–and this time the topic was breaking through in the complex tech and startups space.

Recent stories the panelists wrote or produced should give PR pros some hints about the angles that hook them. Ki Mae Heussner, staff writer for GigaOM, focused on content hackathons as the future of textbooks. Alyson Shontell, an SAI editor for Business Insider, wrote about the size of startup companies’ user bases and whether ten million is the new one million when it comes to users. WNYC’s New Tech City radio host Manoush Zomorodi produced a segment featuring reporters learning to code. As Zomoradi observed, “their visits to different code training venues added texture and flavor” to reflect the reporters’ experiences.

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Ikea Drops ‘Augmented Reality’ Catalog

Remember the halcyon days of 2002, when the holographic touch-screen special effects of Minority Report seemed like a glimpse into a fantastically distant future? Well, this week we took a step closer to that new (virtual) reality thanks to Ikea, those Swedish kings of meatballs and particleboard.

After a big buildup, the company finally dropped its new high-tech holiday catalog, created by Philadelphia’s Brownstein Group and cheerily titled “Celebrate Brilliantly“. We’re generally skeptical of “interactive” products, but any catalog that allows “users” (not readers) to pull down a virtual shade and play with various living room arrangements earns our tentative thumbs up.

For a refresher, here’s the promo video that the company released this summer:

Augmented Reality Becoming An Option For Consumer Engagement

Emerging technologies such as augmented reality are on their way to transforming how we conduct business, according to John Havens, SVP, Porter Novelli. He spoke at Business Development Institute’s Mobile Social conference on Wednesday in New York.

Havens said some of these seemingly futuristic capabilities have actually been around for a while and have been more widely used in other countries.

Corporations have been featuring augmented reality, which can be accessed on a laptop, webcam, or mobile phone in many creative ways. The capabilities include enabling customers to solve a variety of problems.

Augmented reality also allows for a more direct level of engagement with consumers, and represents another platform for PR professionals to consider using on their clients’ brands. Havens predicted that the “utility and ease of use will lead to rapid adoption” of these cutting edge techniques, but that privacy issues will have to be addressed. Read more

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