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Posts Tagged ‘The New Yorker’

The New Yorker PR Director Leaves for Facebook

AlexaCOn Friday Capital New York reported that Alexa Cassanos, a communications veteran who has spent nearly seven years at The New Yorker and currently serves as the publication’s senior director of PR, will leave next month for a spot on the Facebook roster.

Cassanos has an extensive history in PR at some of the biggest names in New York City’s print publishing world.

After nearly a decade at Random House, she held top positions at both Conde Nast and Bon Appetit before joining The New Yorker in 2007.

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Update: New York’s Horse-Drawn Carriage Debate Has Risen To the Level Of a New Yorker Cover

horse & carriage

The question of whether New York’s horse-and-carriage business is inhumane to the animals is not a new one. For years people have debated whether it should continue. Mayor Bill de Blasio made it an issue again way back when he was just a mayoral candidate, voicing his intention to outlaw it upon being elected to office.

The conversation about this old New York practice took a 21st century turn when eCarriages were presented to the public as an alternative by an animal advocacy group called NYCLASS last week. The possible price tag for this automated alternative: $450,000.

But the debate took a star turn when Liam Neeson, the action hero known for taking out baddies in movies like Taken and Non-Stop, came out of left field and shared his thoughts on the topic while he paid a visit on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart

“The horse carriage industry… they made the roads in New York,” he said. “These organizations they want to put out all this false information about how the horses are treated. These guys treat the horses like their children.” He also takes up the cause of the hansom drivers and their livelihood in this op-ed that appeared in The New York Times.

Fast forward and you have protesters gathering in front of Neeson’s apartment building over Easter weekend, and this week’s cover of The New Yorker (right) that questions who should be doing the pulling.

So that escalated didn’t it?

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Native Advertising Is Nothing New (and Here’s Proof)

advertorial 4

You had us at “Dom Perignon”

We already knew this, but yesterday The Awl posted a nice history of “native ads”, aka “advertorials.”

Yes, it’s long—but you should read it anyway. While you’re here, though, you should click through for some images of vintage native ads.

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The New Yorker Editor David Remnick Comments on His Career, the Magazine’s Content and Cover Controversies

New Yorker Cover“While most magazines have their moments in the culture, The New Yorker has mattered a lot at various points in time,” said David Remnick, the magazine’s editor. New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute hosted a wide-ranging conversation with him on Tuesday evening.

Remnick shared his candid thoughts on his career, his editorial role, the magazine’s print and digital content and occasional controversies. While being The New Yorker editor is a once-in-a-blue-moon opportunity, many takeaways from Remnick’s experiences about career timing, managing work relationships, having strong competitors and staying relevant apply across positions.

Below are selected highlights.

Early career: “There were things back then called paid internships”, Remnick emphasized, (in his only reference to the ongoing Conde Nast internship controversy). He got an internship at Newsday, and another at The Washington Post. He also taught English in Japan and served as WaPo’s foreign correspondent in Moscow, competing for stories with Bill Keller of The New York Times.

He attributes his eventual switch from newspapers to magazines to the waiting room at his father’s dental practice. He spent time there reading magazines while listening to rock music. “The New Yorker was hard to grasp beyond the cartoons when I was little, but I warmed to it.”

Being named editor : After Tina Brown left, Remnick, who had been working at The New Yorker, became editor. He said he got the job, even though he had no prior professional editorial experience, after Sy Newhouse’s initial choice was nixed. As Remnick recalled, “they really needed an editor in a hurry. But the geometry of my relationships with other editors changed, and that’s still complicated.”

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9 Pointers for Building Branded Blogs

Gear Patrol Super Gear Featured Image The theme “If you build it, they will come” worked magically in the baseball movie Field of Dreams, but in the crowded blogosphere, only a fraction break through to the big leagues of major media brands. While The Huffington Post, Bleacher Report and Vice are well-known examples, many other blogs succeed on a smaller scale.

A “super bloggers” panel convened at Advertising Week in New York on Thursday, sharing their perspectives on editorial content and sponsored posts with moderator Manoush Zomorodi , host of WNYC’s New Tech City radio show. They included Ben Bowers, founder of Gear Patrol, Julie Carlson, editor-in-chief of Remodelista, Emily Schuman, founder and editor of Cupcakes and Cashmere, and Joy Wilson, founder of Joy the Baker.

While their blogs cover consumer categories like home design, baking, fashion and gadgets, their approaches also apply on the corporate side. Some areas below serve as reminders, while other issues like sponsored content are more recent.

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BuzzFeed’s Favorite Marketing ‘Bot’ Account Is a Weird Product Launch Stunt

In case you spend even more time trolling blogs and Twitter feeds than we do, you’ve probably heard of horse_ebooks. Here are prime examples of the feed at work, posted over the past week:

You get the idea. It appeared to be the perfect encapsulation of all the things we love/hate about Twitter and social in general: unintentionally hilarious snippets of automated spam copy promoting random self-published ebooks and posted without so much as a thought toward order or logic.

Many wondered over time how such a beautiful thing came to be. But, as revealed this morning in The New Yorker (of all places) by acclaimed novelist Susan Orlean (of all people), horse_ebooks is no bot—it’s BuzzFeed creative director Jacob Bakkila and partner Thomas Bender, who worked there “until about a year ago.”

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The New Yorker Refreshes Its Brand for the Digital Age

This short clip doesn’t reveal too many details of The New Yorker‘s brand “refresh” project. Still, it’s interesting for a very brief behind-the-scenes look at how an established magazine plans and executes a calculated rebranding.

For example, the slightest tweak to a classic typeface and the addition of avatars for each columnist can alter the public’s perception of the magazine as it shifts from a stodgy, old-world literary title to a source of news and essays for a wired generation that’s less and less likely to read The New Yorker in a recliner on a Sunday afternoon.

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The World’s ‘Most Quoted Man’ Isn’t Much of an Expert on Anything

Quotes are valuable, right? Everyone wants a client to be quoted in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal or a major tech blog. Well, in case you thought that scoring quotes is all about being a legitimate expert on the topic at hand with something valuable to add to the conversation, The New Yorker gives us this video profile of Greg Packer. He has amazingly been quoted nearly a thousand times on everything from the new iPhone to the local football game and the war in Iraq despite being the least qualified expert around.

This interview quickly establishes the fact that Packer, a retired highway maintenance worker, doesn’t have any particular insight on, well, much of anything. And yet, he’s been so successful in getting his quotes published that the Associated Press had to issue an effective ban on him way back in 2003. How did he do it? He simply showed up and let everyone know that he was eager to offer a few words.

The lesson here is to keep pitching quotes to reporters and bloggers (especially bloggers). Our standards apparently aren’t as high as you might think.

(Ed. note: this video’s being a little wonky on Safari, so if you can’t watch it you might want to try another browser.)

How Charitable Is Facebook’s ‘Internet for All’ Project?

Internet.org sounds like the most noble kind of charity organization: designed to bring broadband to the four billion-plus people around the world who don’t have access, it might be Mark Zuckerberg‘s passion project (and the promo clip is quite stately thanks to JFK).

But Matt Buchanan of The New Yorker, among many others, isn’t so sure about Internet.org’s goals. What’s the problem? Well, the project was founded by FacebookEricsson, MediaTek, Nokia, Opera, Qualcomm, and Samsung—seven companies that would love to get those 4-5 billion wired up so they can provide them with related services (and promo messages). Buchanan takes issue with the fact that Facebook stands to gain millions, if not billions, of new users without actually doing any of the infrastructural legwork required to make the plan a reality. It’s hard to believe, but many of the areas targeted by Internet.org don’t have any electricity, much less 4G service.

This is why Zuckerberg’s Wired interview, published yesterday, reads something like the first stop on a damage control tour.

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Condé Nast Says ‘Screw It, Let’s Just Stop Paying Our Interns’

They never learn. Or, rather, they learn that they can do whatever the hell they want. In the face of a lawsuit filed by impressionable young folk who made “less than $1 an hour” interning for W Magazine and The New Yorker, publishing giant Condé Nast has decided to double down and make it official: they no longer plan to pay their interns anything at all.

We’ll go out on a long, sturdy limb and assume that the company made this decision after a very similar suit filed against Hearst last year failed to proceed in its original “class action” form. The individually disgruntled interns involved in that case plan to press on alone, but Condé seems to think the whole thing’s a headache not worth having. This despite the fact that two guys who sued after working unpaid internships on the set of Black Swan won a settlement.

So there’s not a whole lot to see here, unfortunately.

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