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Posts Tagged ‘things we don’t know whether we like’

STUDY: The Public Wants Its Brands to Get More Political

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Is Nike a Republican or a Democratic brand? What about Apple?

Given the headaches and ruined family dinners inspired by this week’s midterm elections — along with the general sense that Americans have had it with ugly party politics — this post’s headline may come as a surprise.

Yet a study released by the Global Strategy Group found that Americans do assign political identities to brands, and that the general public wants those brands to be more overtly political, whether that means Chick-Fil-A letting the world know how it feels about same-sex marriage or Chipotle asking gun owners not to bring their firearms inside.

Some key findings:

  • 56 percent of respondents think corporations should “take a stance” on political/cultural issues, even when they’re controversial
  • 89 percent believe that corporations have the power to influence social change
  • 80 percent think that these corporations should take action to address our society’s most pressing challenges

The most interesting part is that these numbers mark a big change from last year, when researchers asked the same questions. We spoke to Tanya Meck, Executive Vice President and Managing Director at GSG, to learn more.

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Mediabistro Job FairLand your next big gig! Join us on January 27 at the Altman Building in New York City for an incredible opportunity to meet with hiring managers from the top New York media companies, network with other professionals and industry leaders, and land your next job. Register now!

Here’s Your First PR Sitcom, ‘Seriously Distracted’

In the past we’ve mentioned the fact that depictions of PR in pop culture don’t tend to be too positive. The fictional names that come to mind are Samantha Jones, Olivia Pope and…The Kroll Show. There are some exceptions like FXX’s You’re the Worst, but despite the fact that its female lead works in PR, we don’t see much of what she does beyond hanging with the rap group that seems to be her only client.

When we heard back in March that PopSugar would produce its own mini-sitcom about the industry, we were…interested. Last week, “Seriously Distracted” debuted on PopSugar’s entertainment and celebrity sites, and we were happy to see that it stars Amy Sedaris, brother of serial embellish-er David Sedaris and former star of Stephen Colbert vehicle Strangers with Candy.

Here’s the first episode, guest-starring Kimiko Glenn of Orange is the New Black:

Honest question, since we’ve never worked with unjustly famous people: do they really get this bad?

In summary: the employees of Le Grande PR are (almost) all female and their prospective clients are ignorant, self-obsessed celebrities. But Sedaris’s hair is great, isn’t it? And did you catch the 30 Rock reference?

Second episode after the jump. It involves middle-aged women on Tinder.

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The Value of a Press Release Is (Apparently) Five Dollars

Since it’s a (week)day, it might just be time for yet another post on the value of the press release.

This morning Derek DeVries, senior associate at Lambert, Edwards and Associates, noticed this promoted post on Facebook:

ICYMI, Fiverr is the startup that promises to help you do anything for the not-at-all arbitrary price of $5.

The list of tasks included under that flimsy umbrella just happens to include a big category for “find public relations professionals,” all of whom seem eager to compose said releases for the stated fee.

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Perez Hilton, Other Famous People Had Thoughts on Advertising Week

Seeing Perez Hilton at Advertising Week is kind of like seeing Kid Rock at Cannes or the Kardashians at Paris Fashion Week: you get why they’re hanging around, but you wonder who invited them.

Nonetheless, quite a few names-you-might-know showed up at a red carpet event sponsored by social networking service Keek and agreed to talk for a few seconds about the state of things.

Here’s Mashable founder Pete Cashmore on management:

Perez and more after the jump…

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The Washington Post Reveals The White House’s Aggressive Media Relations Strategy

White Houseeeee

A new piece released yesterday by media reporter Paul Farhi of The Washington Post sheds a bit of light on the media relations strategy practiced by one of the world’s most important sources of information: The White House.

In short, members of the Obama administration’s press team prefer to play an active role in shaping the narrative…even when that narrative is not the one heard by the public at large.

The content addressed in the article is White House press reports, or the summaries prepared for reporters by other reporters. Turns out that press aides often reach out to those responsible to ask for changes before the reports are distributed to the hundreds of other journalists who cover goings-on at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

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L.A. Sheriff’s Office: Stop Calling Us About Facebook!

Since it’s a Friday, we’d like to share this amusing tweet from the L.A. Sheriff’s office:

Things we learned from this single message:

  • Facebook went down for some people this morning/afternoon
  • Some users’ reliance on Facebook is so great that they will call the cops to try and figure out what happened
  • The volume of calls was such that the department’s spokesperson had to let everyone know that the Sheriff’s Department and the Facebook customer service team are not, in fact, the same organization (side note: we’re pretty sure Facebook does not actually have such a team)

Somewhere, Mark Zuckerberg is (probably) smiling…or is he?!

[H/T Salon on that clip]

JustReachOut Thinks It Can Beat Your Startup Pitches

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This week, we’ve witnessed the further evolution of the “do tech startups even need PR?” debate.

Uber’s General Manager Chris Nakutis gave the concept a big thumbs down while contributor Paul Wilke of Upright Position Communications presented ways to try and dispel the sense of inherent distrust between the two parties.

Today, TechCrunch let us know that yet another company called JustReachOut wants to replace you(!) by making the email pitching process a little easier for those startup folks.

We can tell you’re curious…

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EPA Apologizes for Keeping Up with the Kardashians’ Mobile Game

If you have better things to do with your life than scroll twitter at 10:30 PM on a Monday evening, then you may have missed an amusing and bizarre promotional failure on behalf of your government.

Specifically, the EPA’s clean water division posted what certainly looked like a message hyping the (unfortunately) red-hot “Kim Kardashian: Hollywood” mobile game, in which the user can–what else–turn him or herself into a celebrity.

Super-veteran House Rep John Dingell, who has served since 1955 and helped write the original act that created the division, summed up the Internet’s sentiments with a question:

For the record, we don’t believe for a second that he has no idea what a Kardashian is. Good tweet, though.

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PR for the Recently Departed?

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Here’s an amusing piece that our friends at PR Doctor Chicago shared this morning involving public relations for the recently deceased.

In short: “best-selling Southern author and syndicated columnist Ronda Rich“, who also spent a good part of her career in PR/marketing, theorizes that the family of a certain wealthy but disagreeable someone “hired a P.R. firm to write his obituary like a star-gone-bad hires a firm to remake her image.”

Not so sure about that…

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STUDY: Has Social Media Changed Journalism for the Better or Worse?

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A recent study by finance/investor relations group ING attempts to answer a question crucial to the PR industry: how has social media changed the nature of journalism as a product and the behavior of those who practice it?

The answer: more crowdsourcing, less fact-checking and, inevitably, more corrections/retractions.

We know why that matters to PR. Details after the jump.

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