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Posts Tagged ‘Word of Mouth Marketing Association’

Tools Round Up: Cision upgrade; SourceBottle comes to North America; and more

Cision has upgraded its Media Database.

SourceBottle, a free resource similar to HARO or ProfNet, has launched in North America. SourceBottle is focused on topics targeted to women, including beauty, business, and parenting.

The Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) has introduced a mobile app that provides social marketing news and the organization’s own editorial content.

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Word of Mouth Promotions, the Food Truck Way

Contestants from the Food Network program 'The Great Food Truck Race'

Food trucks, food trucks, and more food trucks. Hungry? Look out the window. There’s probably a food truck outside waiting to take your order.

Mastercard has even incorporated food trucks into a current campaign, asking consumers to “like” them or tweet #PricelessNY for a free food truck meal.

One thing that has definitely contributed to the popularity of food trucks is word-of-mouth buzz. Social media is playing a big part in generating all that chatter. At a recent event hosted by the Word of Mouth Marketing Association and Vitrue, Max Clark, the VP of business development at Vitrue, spoke about the ways in which food trucks drive interest and traffic and how it can serve as a lesson to other marketers.

Among the suggestions, create both urgency and a feeling of exclusivity around the brand with limited-time offers, and making the food truck experience unique. You can check out a video of the presentation here. Back in August, the Harvard Business Review took a closer look at why food truck marketing works as well.  And in case you missed it, Zócalo Group went on a “Food Truck Frenzy” around Chicago a few months back. You can check out that clip here.

Word-of-Mouth Goes Holistic

One of the big takeaways from this week’s School of WOM conference, according to Rod Brooks, president of the Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) and VP and CMO of PEMCO Mutual Insurance Company, is how communications pros are now approaching the whole word-of-mouth topic.

“They’re moving their vision away from the tool set and the importance they feel from being on Facebook, Twitter, or on they’re own blogs,” Brooks said. “They’re starting to look at it more holistically.”

The conference took place in Chicago, where more than 300 attendees gathered (60 percent from agencies and service providers, 35 percent from the brand or company side, and five percent from nonprofits)  to talk about all areas of word-of-mouth marketing.  Digital and technology were of course a big topic, with mobile a particular area of interest for people.

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WOMMA’s Paul Rand: “Integration is Key”

The Word of Mouth Marketing Association hosted its 2010 Summit last week. According to Paul Rand, president and CEO of Zócalo Group and president of the WOMMA board of directors, 500 visitors from around the world attended the Las Vegas event.

With an eye towards “best practices and next practices,” the conference focused on a number of topics like the differences between social media and word of mouth marketing, measurement and ROI, and integration.

“Integration is key,” says Rand. “The walls are coming down. [It] really is an organizational effort.”

We spoke with Rand in greater detail about the conference and the word of mouth landscape.

Chinese Milk Company’s Campaign Leads to PR Exec Arrest

China Mengniu Dairy, the top dairy company in China, is under investigation by Chinese authorities over a devious PR strategy: capitalizing on lingering fears about the safety of Chinese dairy products by spreading false rumors about others in the industry. In 2008, contaminated milk made hundreds of thousands of children sick and is blamed for the deaths of six children.

According to Forbes, police are looking into whether Mengniu started a story that certain milk products caused premature sexual development including “the growth of breasts.” The head of Mengniu’s child dairy department and members of the PR staff have been arrested. The department head has also been fired.

A Chinese financial news outlet reports that the rumors can be traced back to the PR executive targeted by the police investigation, Yang Zaifei of Beijing BossePR Consulting. The article, quoted by Forbes, reads:

According to [a] document, an Internet campaign named the “731 Plan,”was to be conducted for up to ten days at the end of last July, and included the use of online articles written by fake consumers and fraudulent blogs in order to trigger public fears over the product safety of rivals. The total budget of the campaign was 250,000 yuan. [USD $37,500]

However, the credibility of the document has yet to be verified by the public security department.

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