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CNBC

Best of Behind the TV Scenes: Nash, Xu, O’Hearn, Capus, Schreier

Throughout the summer, we’ve spotlighted the industry’s top producers; getting the inside story about their shows, how they got to where they are, and advice they have for future TV journalists.

Here are some of the best takeaways from our five-part series, “Behind the TV Scenes.”

Don Nash, “Today” EP                                                                                     Don Nash

“I never wanted to go anywhere else. I got out of college, I got a job as a page at NBC, and I never thought in a million years I’d ever work for a show as great as “Today.” I never thought in a billion years I’d ever be running the place. And I never had any desire to go anywhere else because I didn’t think it could get any better. It’s absolutely important to be loyal to whoever you work for, be it at a network or anywhere else. Loyalty is something I value in a big way; it’s something I value in the people who work for me, and it’s something I value in the people I work for.”

Susie Xu, “OutFront” EP                                                                                                                                                                                                   Susie-Xu

This one’s always tough. I think as a producer you never talk about yourself; it’s all about the anchor. What’s shaped me a lot is being the second child in a Chinese family after the one-child rule was imposed. From the beginning of my life, I was really not supposed to be born. The government came down on my parents and said, ‘you’re not supposed to have a second child, we have a one-child policy here, and you already have one daughter and you don’t need another.’ But my parents defied them, and I think that’s shaped a lot of who I am, and I always think, wow, I wasn’t even really supposed to be around and I’m so lucky to be where I am and have the awesome opportunities I have. It’s pretty cool.

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Mediabistro Course

Multimedia Journalism

Multimedia JournalismStarting September 25, learn how to create interactive packages with photos, audio, and video! Taught by a multiplatform journalist, Darragh Worland will teach you how to come up stories that would be best told in a multimedia format, and create original content for that package using photos, slideshows, and short video and audio pieces. Register now! 
 

Jack Ma, Meet the U.S. Business Networks

AlibabaThe big news on Wall Street today is the Alibaba IPO. If you’re not up to speed on the Chinese e-commerce company, here’s some perspective: its sales are greater than Amazon and eBay combined. That’s big. And today the company goes public listing on the NYSE, and that’s where founder and executive chairman Jack Ma will be today. CNBC is claiming it will get the first interview with Ma, around 9:30amET on “Squawk on the Street,” Bloomberg’s Emily Chang interviews Ma at 9:45am and FBN’s Jo Ling Kent will interview Ma from the NYSE floor at 9:55am. The Alibaba IPO could be the largest ever on Wall Street.

Behind the TV Scenes: Gary Schreier

Gary Schreier

This summer, we’re putting a spotlight on the industry’s top producers; getting the inside story about their shows, how they got to where they are, and advice they have for future TV journalists.

For more than two decades, Gary Schreier has covered some of the biggest news and business stories in America and around the world. “I think it’s been an extraordinary 15 to 20 years,” says Schreier, who started at CNBC, followed by 16  years at Fox News and Fox Business. Now, back at CNBC as EP of “Closing Bell,” Schreier reflects on a wide-ranging career.

TVNewser: You’ve produced for general news and business news. How have you approached producing for the different types?

Schreier: Production is never just production. You always want to think about it hard and how to make the story bigger on television than it would be if you were reading it in print — digitally, online, or a newspaper — or on radio certainly. I think sometimes the difference between general news and business news is general news can lend itself where the production isn’t as important; the story itself can be so compelling, and the pictures so compelling that it just presents itself. Where as business news, say even during a financial crisis, you need to think harder on how to represent things. Business news can tend to be a lot of numbers, a lot of statistics, and you need to break those down and present them in a form that’s much more acceptable to the people. So, it’s a little more challenging, but I find it fun too. It makes you think harder, it makes you work a little harder, and if you can distill something that’s hard to understand with a lot of numbers and stats and bring it down to a level where people kind of crystallize it and get it and helps them make a good, informed decision for their life, and for their money, and for their finances, it’s kind of rewarding.
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Network Coverage Plans for President Obama’s ISIS Address

ObamaCNNIsisBroadcast and cable news networks will provide special coverage tomorrow night at 9pmET for President Obama’s speech on American action against ISIS.

Here is what the networks are planning:

  • CBS’ Bob Schieffer will anchor for the network with “CBS Evening News” anchor Scott Pelley reporting from Iraq, where it will be 4am. The CBS Sports special “Under the Lights” will be delayed.
  • Brian Williams anchors for NBC with Chuck Todd reporting from the DC Bureau, delaying “America’s Got Talent” in the eastern and central time zones.
  • ABC’s chief anchor George Stephanopoulos hosts, along with Jonathan Karl at the White House.
  • Shepard Smith will anchor a special report on FOX, interrupting the season premiere of “Hell’s Kitchen.”
  • On Fox News,  Megyn Kelly will anchor with Bret Baier appearing. “The O’Reilly Factor” will air at 8pmET and “Hannity” at 10pmET will be live, with a special live edition of “Special Report” airing at 11pmET.
  • On CNN, Anderson Cooper and Wolf Blitzer will anchor.
  • John Seigenthaler will anchor a preview of the speech at 8:30pmET for Al Jazeera America as well as coverage of the actual speech. White House Correspondent Mike Viqueira will contribute from the White House.
  • Neil Cavuto will anchor  for Fox Business Network, followed by live editions of “Lou Dobbs Tonight” at 10pmET and “The Independents” at 11pmET.
  •  MSNBC will air a two-hour primetime special hosted by Rachel Maddow from 8pm-10pmET. Chris Matthews, Chris Hayes, Andrea Mitchell and Reverend Al Sharpton will join Maddow. “The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell” will air at 10pmET followed by a live “All In with Chris Hayes” at 11pmET.
  • Bloomberg Politics’s Mark Halperin and John Heilemann will anchor Bloomberg TV’s special primetime coverage of the President’s speech starting at 9PM ET from Washington, DC. Bloomberg’s Al Hunt will contribute reporting and analysis.
  • CNBC will carry the address with hosts as yet unannounced

Wilfred Frost Follows in Father’s Footsteps

WorldwideExchange

Two new anchors are set to join CNBC’s “Worldwide Exchange.”

Wilfred Frost and Seema Mody (center) join Julia Chatterley (left) as hosts of the daily global business show next month. Broadcast from the CNBC London studio, and airing from 4-6amET weekdays, the show aims to be the “essential business and investment news from the Asian, EMEA and American markets.”

Frost, a former fund manager, is new to CNBC. He’s chosen journalism, the career of his late father, Sir David Frost, who died a year ago Sunday. Frost graduated from Oxford with a degree in Politics, Philosophy & Economics and worked for five years at an investment house. Seema Mody has been a reporter with CNBC in New York since 2011. She was previously an anchor and reporter at CNBC-TV18 in Mumbai where she co-anchored “Power Breakfast” and “After the Bell.”

“The ensemble format, with personalities representing rich and diverse experiences, will guide our investor audience through the myriad news stories that break and develop each business day in markets all over the world,” says CNBC SVP & Editor-in-Chief, Nikhil Deogun. “The show provides our viewers with a curated selection of the events that most affect their investment decisions.”

Frost joins Monday. Mody will join in mid-September.

A CNBC Original Steps Aside

ScottCohnScott Cohn, who was on of the original CNBC employees, is leaving full-time work with the business channel, and moving to Santa Cruz, CA where his wife will expand her business in the education field. Cohn will continue to contribute to the network.

In a memo from CNBC president Mark Hoffman, as first reported by Talking Biz News, Cohn joined CNBC on March 20, 1989, a month before the network launched, as part of the original NY/NJ reporting team. In 1990, Cohn opened the Chicago Bureau, where he would stay for 9 years, before returning to headquarters.

He has covered most of the biggest business and general news stories of the past 25 years—from Enron and WorldCom to Hurricane Katrina and the Boston Marathon bombings. He has interviewed the famous and infamous, from Warren Buffett (his first live interview on CNBC in 1998) to Bernie Madoff. His documentaries have showcased the best of CNBC’s reporting.

In a couple of weeks, Scott will leave CNBC to make his journey West. In addition to some teaching and trying his hand at producing documentaries, he will become a special correspondent for CNBC, continuing to spearhead the annual Top States extravaganza.

Please join us in wishing Scott all the very best in his new adventure.

Warren Buffett Surprises Teen Cancer Patient Live on CNBC

Tre Grinner is 17 years old. When he grows up he wants to be an investment banker. Right now, he’s battling Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.

Through the Make-A-Wish Foundation, Grinner has been working as an intern at Goldman Sachs. CNBC caught on to Grinner’s story and brought him in for an interview Thursday. Then CNBC went one further and got Warren Buffett on the phone to give Tre some investment advice. Buffett then surprised the teenager with an invitation to the Berkshire Hathaway annual meeting. “I’d like to meet you personally,” the oracle of Omaha said to the intern from New York. While he was at CNBC headquarters, Tre also spent a half hour talking stocks with Jim Cramer.

Billionaires Carl Icahn and Bill Ackman Bury the Hatchet

IcahnAckmanPershing Square Capital CEO Bill Ackman and fellow billionaire investor Carl Icahn hugged it out this week at CNBC’s Delivering Alpha conference in New York, settling a feud that goes back 10 years, and which came to a boil on CNBC last year in what became one of the most memorable business news debates in years.

New York Times Dealbook reports CNBC arranged a meeting between the two men a few weeks ago, which led to the public appearance at the conference last week.

For a flashback, read through for the January, 2013 billionaire brawl…

(Photo: Heidi Gutman/CNBC)

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CNBC Announces Fall Primetime Lineup; ‘Shark Tank’ Upped to Nightly

cnbc logo_304x200CNBC announced its fall primetime lineup today featuring more “Shark Tank” and original series.

Starting in late September, “Shark Tank,” which currently airs Tuesday’s at 8pm and 9pmET, will air in primetime Monday through Friday.  Since acquiring the popular show’s off-network cable rights, “Shark Tank” has helped CNBC crack the top 10 cable news shows list in the A25-54 demo.

“The Profit” returns on Tuesday, October 14 with 10 new episodes following self-made millionaire Marcus Lemonis as he pours his own money into struggling businesses. Last week, Lemonis helped stave off the extinction of the popular cupcake shop “Crumbs.”

“‘The Profit’ and ‘Shark Tank’ have helped transform CNBC’s Tuesday night lineup into appointment television and also delivered a younger audience to the network in primetime,” said Jim Ackerman, SR. VP of primetime alternative programming for CNBC.

The network’s car-flipping show, “The Car Chasers,” debuts its third season on Wednesday, November 5 at 10pmET. And a new series, “The Filthy Rich Guide,” premieres Wednesday, October 1 at 10pmET. The networks previews “a fun, fast-paced guide that catalogues the ways in which the .01 percent spend their money.”

Rick Santelli: ‘We’re America! We Don’t Believe in Consensus! We Set the Consensus!’

SantelliLiesmanCNBC’s Rick Santelli is nothing if not passionate. From his perch in Chicago today, Santelli appeared on the “Fast Money Halftime Report,” and went on a rant, debating CNBC’s senior economics reporter Steve Liesman, and others on the panel at CNBC headquarters.

Liesman and Santelli have gone at it before. Like here in 2009 and here in 2010. This time, the two debated inflation, interest rates and the Fed.

“Why do we debate it? Why don’t we let the market tell us?,” Santelli said in response to Liesman’s point about Federal Reserve moves. “I don’t care about general consensus. I don’t care that Europe offers entitlements. We’re America! We don’t believe in consensus. We set the consensus,” Santelli screamed, to cheers from the crowds behind in at the Board of Trade in Chicago. Give that man a lozenge.

WATCH:

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