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Archives: October 2012

Miami Reporter Covering New York Hurricane Gets Taken Down by Sandy’s Waves

Ted Scouten, a reporter for CBS station WFOR in Miami, is in New York helping out sister station WCBS cover hurricane Sandy. Scouten, stationed in the Rockaways section of Queens, got a real New York welcome Monday as Sandy’s surge sent waves into the street and took him down, as shown on “CBS This Morning.”

In Sandy’s Wake, NBC Expands ‘Today,’ Plans Primetime Special

The “Today” show’s four hours are dedicated to the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy as the superstorm continues to move inland. Matt Lauer and Savannah Guthrie are reporting from studio 1A while Al Roker, Natalie Morales and more than a dozen NBC, CNBC, and Weather Channel correspondents contribute. New Jersey Governor Chris Christie was a guest on “Today” and the other network morning shows. During a news conference yesterday, Christie criticized the mayor of Atlantic City for telling his residents to hunker down, rather than evacuate. “Today” also talked with the mayor who called Christie’s comments “reprehensible.”

NBC News will produce a primetime special anchored by Brian Williams at 10pmET/PT with the latest on the power situation and what’s left of the superstorm.

Bounty Sinks: ‘Her real life ending was a final act as dramatic as anything Hollywood could have imagined’

On “CBS This Morning” correspondent Barry Peterson recounts the loss of the HMS Bounty replica ship which sank Monday morning off North Carolina, as it was making its annual trek from Connecticut to Florida. The captain went down with the ship. Also lost: crew member Claudine Christian who was recovered from the Atlantic but pronounced dead.

Heather Tesch Leaving Weather Channel

Heather Tesch is among the Weather Channel on air meteorologists losing their job as the network revamps programming and cuts up to 7% of its workforce. Tesch thought Sunday would be her last day, writing on Facebook:

But Hurricane Sandy has kept her around a little longer. Tesch co-anchored Day Planner on Monday as Hurricane Sandy marched up the East Coast. The Minnesota native has been with Weather for the last 14 years.

As Sandy Storms Ashore, Some Tweets Become Unreliable Source of Information

The great thing about Twitter: it’s a great way to communicate news as it happens. The bad thing about Twitter, that news may not have really happened. Around 9:30pm @CNNWeather sent a Tweet that the floor of the New York Stock Exchange had flooded. CNN’s Chad Myers told Piers Morgan: “I got that from the National Weather Service chat bulletin board.” Seems legit enough. But it wasn’t:

Earlier in the evening, a Dateline NBC associate producer took to Twitter to report windows at 30 Rockefeller Center, which is home to NBC News and MSNBC, had blown out:

That was retweeted again and again, so much so that CNN reported it as news in a lower third banner during the 10pm hour. There’s no confirmation that any windows at 30 Rock have blown out, and while it may turn out to be true, it seems there should be some more fact checking before going from one Twitter observation to a cable news network report.

> Update: We’ve confirmed one window on the 36th floor of 30 Rockefeller Center blew out.

Power Outage During Shepard Smith’s FOX Report

The Manhattan-based news networks are not immune to the power problems caused by Hurricane Sandy. Parts of lower Manhattan are without power, intentionally cut by the utility Con Ed to prevent potential damage to underground infrastructure. But power surges, where lights dim and then come back up, are occurring throughout the city (including in this writer’s apartment).

On FNC’s “Fox Report,” Shepard Smith anchored portions of his show from a darkened studio. “The power in Midtown Manhattan has clearly just gone off as our studio has gone completely dark,” said Smith around 7:45pm. “We have backup generators that allow us to run most of our equipment. But not the huge light grids.”

Filling Up and Hunkering Down in Newsrooms

This is no doubt a familiar site in newsrooms across the Northeast. Air mattresses are being filled up as staffers spend the night — or whenver they can catch some sleep — at work as coverage of Hurricane Sandy continues.

CNBC’s Michelle Caruso-Cabrera who is anchoring primetime coverage with Bill Griffeth Tweeted this picture of “Squawk Box” senior producer Robert Contino who’s got his queen size all ready to go at CNBC HQ in Englewood Cliffs, NJ. (Do the production assistants only get twin size?).

This has become somewhat of a tradition for Caruso-Cabrera, who Tweeted the air mattress situation during Hurricane Irene last year.

The Inevitable Hurricane Sandy Video Bomb

This was inevitable. On CNN just after 5pm, Ali Velshi was reporting live from Atlantic City when three shirtless geniuses video bombed his liveshot. Meteorologist Chad Myers, after delivering the 5pm NHC update, commented that the trio “should be off the streets and into a house somewhere, that’s certainly not the place to be.” There’s a 6pm curfew for the city, which is about the time Sandy is expected to make landfall just south of where Velshi is reporting.

The Scoreboard: Friday, October 26

25-54 demographic (Live +SD)

  • Total day: FNC: 416 | MSNBC: 255 | CNN: 153 | HLN: 194
  • Primetime: FNC: 665 | MSNBC: 487 | CNN: 197 | HLN: 134

5p: 6p: 7p: 8p: 9p: 10p: 11p: 12a:
FNC TheFive: Baier: Shep: O’Reilly: Hannity: Greta: O’Reilly: Hannity:
458 455 528 799 627 569 499 453
MSNBC Matthews: Sharpton: Matthews: EdShow: Maddow: O’Donnell: EdShow: Maddow:
262 301 381 438 588 435 280 302
CNN Blitzer: Blitzer: Burnett: Cooper: Morgan: Cooper: Burnett: Morgan:
131 138 178 205 236 150 169 169
HLN Express: Express: VelezMitch: Grace: Mysteries: Mysteries: Grace: Mysteries:
40 26 75 160 135 120 130 110

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How Dan Rather Changed Hurricane Coverage

Most Americans know Dan Rather as an anchor at CBS News, or in his current role at AXS TV (formerly HDNet). What many people may not know, however, is that Rather was the originator of what is now a ubiquitous part of hurricane coverage: superimposing radar of the storm over a map.

Rather, who was a local reporter in Texas, jerry-rigged the graphic while covering Hurricane Carla near Galveston in 1961. He told us all about it when we interviewed him for the mediabistroTV series “My First Big Break.”

WATCH:

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