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Posts Tagged ‘Clarissa Ward’

Broadcast and Cable Networks Dispatch Correspondents to Ukraine

Ukraine CBS CoverageAs tensions escalate in Ukraine, cable and broadcast networks are ramping up their presence in the region.

Each of the broadcast networks have correspondents in Ukraine: Bill Neely is in Simferopol for NBC News, Alex Marquardt is in Crimea for ABC News and Elizabeth Palmer is in Sevastopol for CBS News. Charlie D’Agata and Clarissa Ward are also reporting from Kiev for CBS.

As for the cable networks: Anderson Cooper is headed to the region for CNN to anchor “AC360″ tonight. Fox News correspondent Amy Kellogg is live from Kiev today, and MSNBC has been using NBC’s Neely for live shots from the region. Nick Schifrin and Jennifer Glasse are on the ground in Simferopol for Al Jazeera America, and Phil Ittner is reporting from Kiev for the network.

Ukraine received extensive coverage on the Sunday public affairs shows yesterday, with Secretary of State John Kerry appearing on all the broadcast shows — except one. “For the record, we invited Secretary of State John Kerry to join us today,” Chris Wallace said on “Fox News Sunday.” “But although the White House put him out on all the other broadcast Sunday shows, they declined to make him available to us or you.”

>Update: Shepard Smith is also traveling to Ukraine for Fox News. He will anchor “Shepard Smith Reporting” and report for the network’s daytime and primetime shows from Kiev.

News Pro Names ’12 to Watch in TV News’

12 to watch in TV NewsTV Week’s News Pro magazine is out with its forward-looking “12 to Watch in TV News” list. Unsurprisingly, HLN president Albie Hecht is on the list, as he’s expected to make major changes to the network early on in the new year.

Other network executives featured are NBC News President Deborah Turness—who is rumored to be eyeing major shakeups, including cutting on-air talent and possibly even making changes to “Meet the Press”—and Al Jazeera America President Kate O’Brian, who told TVNewser AJAM aims to become the top news division in America. Whether she can lift the new network from its ratings woes in an interesting storyline to watch in 2014.

Fox News’ Megyn Kelly made the list after she was moved to the 9pmET primetime slot earlier this year. Kelly has generated both strong ratings and holiday controversy on FNC. Read more

NBC News Hires Ben Plesser From CBS

nbc-newsBen Plesser has joined NBC News as the senior producer of chief foreign correspondent Richard Engel‘s production unit. Plesser comes from CBS News, where he has worked since 1999.

In his time at CBS, Plesser worked as a producer on “60 Minutes” and “Evening News.” Most recently, he has been a producer for CBS News foreign correspondent Clarissa Ward, who frequently reports from the same places Engel and his team travel. In 2011, he was the first Western journalist to report from Tripoli during the uprising in Libya.

Plesser joins executive producer Madeleine Haeringer and producer Jamie Novogrod in Engel’s production unit. He will be based in London.

The Accolades Ticker: Wallace, Henry, Ward

  • Fox News anchor Chris Wallace is receiving the Paul White Award at an RTDNA conference in Anaheim this weekend. He talks to the OC Register about the honor. ““My dad won it, so that means a lot to me.”

  • Fox News White House correspondent Ed Henry was inducted into the Nevada broadcaster’s Hall of Fame on Saturday. Henry was married in Nevada, and owns property there. He was inducted alongside ESPN’s Colin Cowherd.

  • The name’s Ward, Dr. Clarissa Ward. The CBS News foreign correspondent spoke at Middlebury Language School’s 99th Summer session and was awarded an honorary Doctor of letters degree. She thanked attendees in five different languages.

CBS’ John Miller Secures Another Boston Bombing Scoop

There is a reason why at the CBS upfront in New York yesterday, the first CBS News correspondent mentioned by name was John Miller (the only other two mentioned by name were David Martin and Clarissa Ward).

Following the Boston bombing, the Benghazi investigation and other issues that involve law enforcement, Miller has proven to have impeccable sources in the law enforcement community. That was proven again this morning as he sent other networks scrambling to confirm another scoop: that Boston bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev scribbled a note appearing to confess to the crimes on the inside of the boat he was hiding in.

WATCH:

Former ABC News Chief David Westin On What TV News ‘Doesn’t Cover’

Former ABC News president David Westin writes in The Huffington Post about CNN’s coverage of the Carnival Triumph disaster, and what it says about the state of TV news coverage.

Westin argued that the Triumph was a story worth covering, and doesn’t fault CNN for giving it more airtime than its competition. Rather he argues, “the problem isn’t with what TV news covers, it’s with what it doesn’t cover. Or doesn’t cover nearly enough.”

Specifically, he says there should be more stories from war zones like Syria, and places often cut off from western society like North Korea and the Congo.

What’s more, it’s a story that can be told well on television. Some TV reporters have shown us this, as did my former colleague, Clarissa Ward, who recently received an Alfred I. Dupont Award for her reporting on Syria for CBS News. In fairness, the other national TV news organizations have reported intermittently from and about Syria. But none has shown the kind of enthusiasm and follow-through that we saw when it came to the cruise to nowhere in the Gulf of Mexico.

As it happens Westin’s former employee at ABC, “Nightline” anchor Terry Moran, is currently reporting from inside Syria, with another report from Damascus set to air tonight.

The Ticker: Wallace, Ward, Washington

  • Chris Wallace is featured in an NFL documentary about Doug Williams, the first African-American quarterback in the NFL to win a Super Bowl. The “Fox News Sunday” host, a well-known Washington Redskins fan, is featured in three parts of the series.

  • CBS News foreign correspondent Clarissa Ward answers a few questions for Forbes about her extensive reporting from Syria, as well as sharing a few lessons she’s learned throughout the course of her career. “I started out at the overnight assignment desk which is absolutely the lowest rung on the ladder but I learned humility which is enormously important in this industry,” she said.

  • C-SPAN kicks off its feature series on U.S. First Ladies next week with a profile on the the life and legacy of Martha Washington. The report, which airs February 25 at 9pmET, takes viewers from Colonial Williamsburg to Philadelphia to examine Washington’s life and legacy. 

Clarissa Ward Accepts duPont Award: ‘I Felt Humbled and Tremendously Honored’

CBS News foreign correspondent Clarissa Ward traveled to New York this week to accept the Alfred I. duPont Columbia University Award for her series of “Inside Syria” reports.

“I was the last person to accept my award, and by the time it came around I was feeling pretty humbled because I was just awestruck but what incredibly compelling and diverse reports had been honored,” Ward told TVNewser. “I felt humbled and tremendously honored and very excited.”

Ward said she was particularly proud to accept the award from ABC’s Christiane Amanpour, who she called “a heroine and a role model.”

Ward and producer Ben Plesser were the first American journalists to report live from Syria with the rebels. In the past year, she has traveled to the war-torn country six times for reports that have aired on “CBS Evening News” and “60 Minutes.” Ward called reporting from Syria “extremely challenging,” noting the fractured nature of the conflict.

“In conventional warfare you might embed with an army, but this is a completely different kettle of fish,” she said. “You’re embedding with rebel forces and each group has its own ways and its own rules and its own methods.”

Because of this, Ward said she anticipates seeing less reporting from Syria this year.

“I think you’ll see fewer journalists spending time with the rebels, partially because of safety concerns, which are very legitimate,” Ward said. “I really want to go in only when I feel like I have a story that furthers the bigger picture.”

Ward cited the recent experience of NBC’s Richard Engel, who was held captive for several days in Syria last month. Read more

CBS News Snags DuPont Award For Syria Coverage

The Alfred I duPont-Columbia University Awards have been handed out, and among the winners was CBS News and correspondent Clarissa Ward, for her “CBS Evening News” series on Syria.

“To report this extraordinary series of nine stories, Ward entered Syria posing as a tourist carrying only a small camera,” the judges noted.

Current TV also took home an award for its “Vanguard” special about “Arming the Mexican Cartel.” Following the award Current announced that the program would return with new episodes next year.

A number of local radio and TV stations and print outlets also received awards. The full list of winners can be viewed here.

Clarissa Ward: Syria Coverage Difficult ‘for security and safety, but also emotionally’

Since fighting began in Syria, 26 journalists have been killed in the region. American Journalism Review talks to some of the reporters who have snuck into the country to report on the violence, including CBS News’ Clarissa Ward, who has visited Syria six times since she joined CBS:

On one occasion, the journalists followed Abu Ibrahim and his younger brother Azzu into battle. A video clip aired on CBS shows Ibrahim struggling to drag the limp body of a fallen comrade to safety under heavy gunfire. The rebels had no radio communications and Ibrahim “could not have known that on the other side of the road his brother Azzu also had been shot,” Ward reported.

Ward was in the room when women in the family learned of Azzu’s death and collapsed in grief. His body, along with others killed in the fight, was placed in a hall below the house. At breakfast the next day, Ward sat silently, watching as Ibrahim picked up a piece of traditional flatbread. “He was chewing and chewing, but he couldn’t swallow. Suddenly, he just started to sob. I cried with him,” she recalls. Later, the elder brother led the funeral procession. Read more

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