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Posts Tagged ‘Greg Palkot’

Reporters in North Korea Learn About Missile Launch From News Desks in New York and Washington

Forty minutes into a 5-day window, North Korea launched a rocket from a facility in the northwestern part of the country. The launch, at 7:39am local time, was first reported on U.S. cable news 14 minutes later by CNN’s John King. The news was followed minutes later on Fox News, CNBC World, Fox Business and, at 7:13pm, on MSNBC.

ABC News led the way on the broadcast networks not only reporting that the missile had launched, but during a network special at 7:09pmET, correspondent Martha Raddatz reported that the launch was a failure. ABC’s Diane Sawyer anchored the special and also got phone reports from Jake Tapper at the White House and Bob Woodruff in North Korea. “We don’t have a chance to see the actual video of this launching,” said Woodruff, adding “We were thinking they were going to show it live to us in the press room.”

More than 100 foreign correspondents, including CNN’s Stan Grant, NBC’s Richard Engel and FNC’s Greg Palkot are reporting from North Korea this week.

Later in the evening, Engel went on MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow Show to report he, and other correspondents only learned the news from colleagues stateside. “We were alerted by our own news desk,” said Engel, then telling what happened next:

We rushed into the press center, the only place that has internet, the only place that has computer access, and we saw our minder [who] said, “Are you ready? We’re going to go in a few hours to a music festival.” We said, “What music festival? There has just been a rocket launch.” We were met with a completely blank stare and he shrugged his shoulders and ran out of the room.

The Death of the Foreign Correspondent? Not So Much

A year ago today we wrote about one of those annual “predictions” stories. It was from Mashable’s Vadim Lavrusik who had a host of predictions for the news media in 2011. This was No. 6:

6. The Death of the ‘Foreign Correspondent’

Lavrusik, who is also an adjunct professor at Columbia University’s journalism school, argued that news organizations would rely “heavily on stringers and, in many cases, social content uploaded by the citizenry.”

How right he was… and wasn’t.

While much of the video from the Arab Spring and Japanese earthquake & tsunami — two of the biggest stories on the planet this year — was user generated: captured on smartphones, uploaded to video sites and shared around the world on social networks, it took the network correspondents to put into perspective what we were seeing, to interview some of those captured on video (or who captured the video), and put into greater context what it all means. That’s really their job. So that at the end of a 1-minute 45-second package or 2-minute live shot, we all have a better understanding of the story.

This year, the networks did not rely “heavily on stringers,” the news was simply too broad and complex and the competition too great. No network wants to be left out.

So they dug deep into their pockets and sent in correspondents and anchors to report what was happening. Brian Williams, Diane Sawyer, Anderson Cooper, Scott Pelley, even Barbara Walters have all traveled the globe this year for their networks. ABC’s Christiane Amanpour racked up more stamps on her passport and NBC’s Richard Engel and CBS’s Lara Logan — who

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Death of Kim Jong-il, From Twitter to Cable, 50 Hours Later

Not long after the news of the death of North Korea’s Kim Jong-il broke, just after 10pmET tonight, “Kim Jong” and “Pyongyang” began trending on Twitter. The death of a ruling world leader — in this case a supreme leader — would be instant news around the globe. But the fact that it took two days for the news to be made public, speaks volumes about the global isolation in which North Korea exists. The first reports were that Kim died of fatigue at 8:30 am Dec. 17 (6:30pmET Friday) during train ride. That was later updated to “massive heart attack.”

As for U.S. cable news coverage: Fox News’s Harris Faulkner broke in with the news at 10:11pmET during “Geraldo at Large.” Geraldo Rivera, reporting from Kuwait with some of the last U.S. troops to leave Iraq earlier today, began incorporating the news later in his show. Interestingly, Greg Palkot, also in Kuwait today, reported Fox News’s pre-produced obituary on Kim. CNN’s Don Lemon reported the news at 10:12pm 10:07. Wolf Blitzer, who traveled to North Korea last December, phoned in. CNN/U.S. began simulcasting CNNI at 10:23. MSNBC produced breaking news specials at 10:17 and 10:32pm.

Twitter, as usual, led the way with the headline of the death. It included original reporting:

@mitchellreports: U.S officials have no offficial comment on Kim’s death. Long anticipated but no warning it was imminent

And commentary:

@AndyLevy: RIP* Kim Jong-Il *Rot In Pieces

Cable Nets Go Live as Final U.S. Convoy Leaves Iraq

At 11:28pmET, U.S. cable news networks broke into coverage as the final U.S. combat troops crossed from Iraq into Kuwait, creating a lasting image for the end to the 8-and-a-half-year war, which was officially declared over on Thursday. CNN/U.S. and CNNI simulcast coverage with Hala Gorani and Don Lemon co-anchoring. Michael Holmes reported from Kuwait, Arwa Damon from Baghdad and Martin Savidge, who traveled the 5-and-a-half hours with the American convoy, reported by phone (and later, around 12:27amET, via livestream from inside an MRAP vehicle) after crossing into Kuwait. CNN/U.S. stayed live until MidnightET (CNNI until 12:30amET) and included interviews with soldiers at Camp Virginia, Kuwait.

On Fox News Geraldo Rivera and Greg Palkot reported live from Kuwait, with the final MRAP truck crossing over at 11:38pmET / 7:38am along the Kuwait/Iraq border. “I have tears in my eyes, so emotional,” said Rivera, who is on his 11th trip to the region. Fox News wrapped coverage at 11:46pm.

MSNBC produced a 4-minute special report with Richard Engel live in Kuwait. Engel too, traveled with the U.S. convoy. “So much has transpired when they crossed this berm in 2003 going North,” said Engel. “They were on their way to topple a dictator. Now they are crossing this berm again. The dictator has been toppled and the troops are going home.”

FNC’s Greg Palkot Reunited with Egyptian That Saved His Life Earlier This Year

In February, Fox News correspondent Greg Palkot and his cameraman Olaf Wiig were hospitalized after being beaten while covering the protests in Cairo’s Tahrir Square.

Today, Palkot was once again in Egypt to cover the elections there, and he caught up with an Egyptian man who risked his own life to shelter the pair and keep them away from the thugs:


Bin Laden Killed: Foreign Correspondents En Route to Pakistan

Foreign correspondents spread throughout the Middle East are en route to Pakistan today, following the news that Osama Bin Laden was killed there by U.S. special forces. 2011 has seen a flurry of news from the Middle East and North Africa, with news happening almost daily from Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and other countries.

ABC News of course already had a correspondent in-country in Nick Schifrin, who had the first video footage from the compound this morning.

CNN’s Nic Robertson is heading to the country, where he is expected to appear on the channel tonight. Robertson was in Afghanistan during the 9/11 attacks, and has deep ties to the region.

Fox News Channel’s Greg Palkot and Dominic Di-Natale are also heading to Pakistan.

TV News crews in Japan on the move with radiation fears mounting

With dozens of U.S. TV news journalists now on the ground in Japan, the bosses back home are becoming increasingly concerned about the potential for radiation poisoning due to the deteriorating conditions at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.

ABC’s David Muir, who was in the area of the plant yesterday and moved south after the explosion. During “Nightline” he held up a radiation meter which was not detecting anything out of the ordinary. This morning, that changed Diane Sawyer and her crew began heading back to Tokyo, explaining to George Stephanopoulos on “GMA” that radiation levels had increased through the day. “We came down this highway, the 7 1/2 hour trip,” said Sawyer. “We’re about midway through it now.” Correspondent Clarissa Ward has also moved out of the area. Her Japanese translator left the ABC News team yesterday, fearing radiation poisoning.

Weather becomes an important factor in this story as correspondents and crews watch the wind while covering the story.

“We are closely monitoring the situation, moment by moment,” David Verdi, VP of worldwide news gathering for NBC News tells TVNewser. “We are constantly consulting with our experts and tracking the wind patterns.” In addition to Lester Holt (right), Ann Curry, Chris Jansing, Ian Williams and Lee Cowan are covering for NBC/MSNBC.

CBS’s Harry Smith was in Northern Japan this morning for “The Early Show,” but he and all other CBS staffers have left. “We have moved our teams out of Sendai, Japan and we continue to reassess deployments, as the situation warrants,” says CBS News VP Ingrid Ciprian-Matthews.

CNN has 12 on-air and dozens more off-air staffers in Japan. Anderson Cooper has left the area of the nuclear plant and is heading north and will anchor from Akita, Japan, north of Sendai. “The situation is under constant review and the safety and well-being of our reporters in the field is our top priority,” says a spokesperson.

Fox News says it is constantly evaluating the situation, and has pulled its correspondents back to Tokyo. Shepard Smith, Adam Housley and Greg Palkot are in Tokyo, while David Piper is at Yokota airbase.

Shepard Smith en route to Japan; Greg Palkot’s first reporting since being attacked in Egypt

Fox News anchor Shepard Smith is heading to Japan and is expected to be in place for his 3pmET show tomorrow, which will be 4am Tuesday morning in Tokyo. Last night, Fox News correspondent Greg Palkot reported from Mito, Japan — his first on-air report since being attacked while covering protests in Egypt last month. He was back on FOX News Sunday this morning.

Fox News is going into overdrive tonight in primetime. There will be two-hour editions of “Fox Report” and “Geraldo at Large.” Adam Housley is also on the scene for Fox and is Tweeting his experience between live shots:

Finishing our food and finally getting some sleep after basically being awake since Thursday Night.

Palkot’s report, after the jump…

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Who the networks are sending to Japan

Christiane Amanpour is among the network anchors packing their bags and heading for Japan. Amanpour will host “This Week” from Tokyo on Sunday, the only Sunday show host to do so. ABC News says “World News” weekend anchor David Muir, and correspondent Clarissa Ward are also en route to Japan to report on the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami.

For NBC News Weekend “Today” and Weekend “Nightly News” anchor Lester Holt, is on his way as is “Today” news anchor Ann Curry. Correspondent Lee Cowan, and Ian Williams are in route as well.

For CBS News, anchor Harry Smith will lead coverage for the network. Correspondent Lucy Craft continues her reporting and correspondents Bill Whitaker and Charlie D’Agata are also en route.

For Fox News, correspondents Adam Housley, David Piper and Greg Palkot are en route.

And here’s who is going, or already there, for CNN.

But it’s Amanpour who gives real meaning to the term globetrotter.

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FNC’s Greg Palkot on Lara Logan: ‘I feel for her. It was a tough crowd’

Before the vicious attack on CBS correspondent Lara Logan, a number of other western journalists were beaten by protesters, including Fox News correspondent Greg Palkot, who was hospitalized in Egypt.

Palkot spoke to TV Guide about Logan’s situation, and returning to work:

TV Guide Magazine: You’ve worked side by side with Lara Logan in Afghanistan. What was your reaction when you heard the news about how she was attacked?


Palkot:
I feel for her. It was a tough crowd. Even in a crowd that is exultant, crazy things can happen. I haven’t had a chance to speak to her personally. I’ve been contacting people in the CBS family about her. From what I read, it appears that she’s improving.

TV Guide Magazine: How soon are you going back to work?

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