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Posts Tagged ‘Mike Wallace’

Mike Wallace Memorial Set for May 1

CBS News is planning a memorial service for the late “60 Minutes” correspondent Mike Wallace. The service, open to family, friends and colleagues, will be held Tuesday, May 1 at the Rose Hall in Time Warner Center. The 93-year-old Wallace died April 8. His son, Fox News Channel host Chris Wallace, as well as hundreds of Mike Wallace’s colleagues from his more than 45 years at CBS News, will attend.

11 Million Watch ’60 Minutes’ Mike Wallace Special

Sunday’s “60 Minutes,” which was an hour-long tribute to its founding correspondent Mike Wallace, was Sunday’s most-watched show, and the 8th most-watched primetime program of the past week, drawing 11.03 million viewers.

The show also won its time period in A25-54 viewers (2.4/07) and was up +14% percent over the same night last year (2.1/06). The increase in the key news demo is part of a trend for “60,” which is up +6% in A25-54 and +5% in A35-54 season-to-date.

The tribute to Wallace, who died last Saturday at the age of 93, consisted of interviews with him about his life and his work conducted by the 60 MINUTES correspondents with whom he worked.

Why Mike Wallace Never Interviewed Willie Nelson

In addition to last night’s hour-long look back at the life and work of Mike Wallace, “60 Minutes” Overtime has dozens of extras, including the thoughts of producers, editors, assistants and even the show’s make-up artist who worked alongside the “60 Minutes” original, including this from Josh Howard, who spent 13 years at “60 Minutes,” six of them producing for Wallace.

I was sitting at my desk one day when Mike walked into my office and said, “How about doing a piece about Willie Nelson?” At least, that’s what I thought he had said. It wasn’t the kind of story I usually produced, but I figured it would be a nice change from the more serious stuff. I said, “Sure, but what got you interested in Willie Nelson?”

He looked at me like I was a fly in his soup (one of his favorite expressions.) “WILLIE NELSON? WHY THE F— WOULD I WANT TO DO WILLIE NELSON? WHAT I SAID WAS, ‘WINNIE’ AND ‘NELSON.’ YOU KNOW, MANDELA. POSSIBLY YOU HAVE HEARD OF THEM?”

FishbowlDC reports on what — or rather who — was left out of the “60 Minutes special.

Mike Wallace Retrospective at Chicago Museum

If you’re in Chicago and have the time, head down to The Museum of Broadcast Communications which is holding a day-long Mike Wallace retrospective today, showing some of Wallace’s most important works from “60 Minutes,” “You Are There,” “CBS Reports,” and a little-known early 1960s show Wallace hosted called, “Biography.”

Chicago TV critic Robert Feder writes about Wallace’s connection to Chicago and about that show.

Wallace was at a low point in his career when he hosted Biography, according to television historians Tim Brooks and Earle Marsh. It was between his earlier phase as an actor, announcer, game show host and commercial pitchman, and his later ascendancy as a CBS News correspondent and eventual 60 Minutes icon.

“Wallace had made his name in news as a fire-breathing interviewer in the late 1950s, but was made to tone down his approach by nervous network executives, and eventually forced out of network news work altogether,” Brooks and Marsh wrote. “The considerable success of Biography helped reestablish his name.”

Wallace died Saturday night at age 93.

’60 Minutes’ is Sunday’s #1 Show

While the ratings for CBS’s coverage of The Masters were off substantially from last year — down -16% in household rating (8.0/19 share vs. 9.5/20),  worst final round since 2004 — the sudden-death overrun gave a lift to “60 Minutes.” The show was Sunday’s top primetime program in total viewers drawing 11.73 million, and won its time period in the two younger demos: A25-54 (3.3/09) and A18-49 (2.2/07).

Sunday’s show began and ended with a remembrance of Mike Wallace who died Saturday night. This Sunday’s show will include an expanded remembrance for Wallace who spent nearly 40 years at the broadcast.

What ‘Haunted’ the ‘Irascible, Competitive’ Mike Wallace

This morning the network news shows paid tribute to Mike Wallace, who died Saturday night at age 93. On “CBS This Morning” Wallace’s “60 Minutes” colleagues Morley Safer and Steve Kroft shared their thoughts. Safer revealed a side of Wallace many did not know: That he was “unsure of himself.”

“Mike always felt that he had not paid his dues as a journalist,” said Safer. “That uncertainty or even perhaps shame of having done commercials and silly stuff haunted him.”

On “Good Morning America” Robin Roberts reported the obituary discussing it with George Stephanopoulos. And on the “Today” show Tom Brokaw reported the story reflecting on the life of his “friend and competitor.” Story after the jump…

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Memories of Mike Wallace, Off Camera

I admit it – I always had a soft spot for Mike Wallace.

Not the on-camera Wallace, who in his glory days as “60 Minutes’’ chief inquisitor struck fear into the hearts of evil-doers, large and small; but the real Wallace, who died Saturday, a month before his 94th birthday.

I think he had a soft spot for me, too. Not once during 30 years’ of interviews did he lose his legendary temper or make a cutting remark or dodge a question. More than a few times, he returned deadline calls from aboard an airplane — a big deal back in the day.

My favorite interview took place in his CBS office in New York in 1984, shortly before the infamous Westmoreland libel trial. Wallace was a defendant and key witness in the $120 million suit, filed by Gen. William Westmoreland for a 1982 CBS documentary that claimed he had deliberately misrepresented enemy troop strength.

It was a horrible time for Wallace, then 66 and in his 16th season with “60 Minutes.” The trial was weighing heavy on his mind, and his third marriage was on the rocks. Still, he didn’t hesitate when I asked him, on sheer whim, what he usually ate for breakfast.

Two pieces of whole-wheat toast and a vitamin, he said. And, like his father before him, a cup of hot water and lemon … “for the kaboom.”

At that moment, Myron Leon Wallace, the son of Russian immigrants, could have been my father.

The Westmoreland trial lasted 18 weeks. It was settled out of court in February 1985, just days before it was to have gone to the jury. Wallace, scheduled as a defense witness, had not testified.

I couldn’t think of Wallace without thinking of Don Hewitt, the late “60 Minutes” creator and executive producer. He and Wallace, an original “60″ correspondent from 1968, were infamous for their high-decibel office battles. I dubbed them the Sunshine Boys.

I was on the phone with Wallace once when Hewitt grabbed the receiver from his hands and said, “You should be talking to me instead of Mike. I’m much more interesting.” Chuckling, I told him to shut his pie hole and to put Wallace back on the phone. He did.

Wallace and Hewitt “were legendary for their quarrels,” former CBS News president Andrew Heyward recalled yesterday. “Mike was quick to raise his voice, as was Don. They always

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Tribute to Mike Wallace on Next Sunday’s ’60 Minutes’

At the start of tonight’s “60 Minutes,” following the sudden-death finish at The Masters, Morley Safer announced that next Sunday’s show will be “an extended tribute” to “60″ original Mike Wallace. “More than anyone else he was responsible for the continuing success of ’60 Minutes.’ We are all in his debt.”

Chris Wallace Honored By National Press Foundation

Fox News Channel anchor Chris Wallace is the winner of the National Press Foundation’s Sol Taishoff Award for Broadcast Journalism.

Wallace accepted the award at the NPF’s annual dinner last night in Washington, DC. In his speech, he named his father Mike Wallace, his stepfather Bill Leonard, and Fox News CEO Roger Ailes as the greatest influences on his journalism career, according to Broadcasting & Cable.

Wallace also spoke with Boston.com about the honor. “’60 Minutes’ has won it — and Ted Koppel, Charlie Gibson, Brit Hume,” he said. “Quite frankly, some of the people I admire most in the business. To be invited to stand with those heavyweights means a lot. It really means a lot to me.”

A Few More Minutes with Andy Rooney

Friends and colleagues from across the TV spectrum joined Andy Rooney‘s four children this morning at Rose Hall, bidding farewell to the CBS News essayist, who died November 4 following complications from minor surgery.

Rooney’s son Brian Rooney, a longtime correspondent at ABC News, hosted the memorial service which included remarks from Andy Rooney’s three daughters, Ellen Rooney, Emily Rooney and Martha Fishel and Rooney’s girlfriend of 7 years, former “Today” show “girl” Beryl Pfizer, who had known Rooney since 1950. Rooney’s grandchildren were there, including Justin Fishel Pentagon producer for Fox News Channel.

Brian Rooney talked about how, over the past several weeks he’s gone through his father’s belongings and found everything from a $6,000 uncashed check from CBS, to a diary entry dated March 8, 1941: “Went to Gallagher’s. Don’t get chicken at a steakhouse.”

“What you saw, was the same show that we had at dinnertime,” said Rooney.

CBS News chairman and “60 Minutes” EP Jeff Fager as well as Rooney’s “60″ family: Morley Safer, Steve Kroft and Scott Pelley all spoke at the service.

Safer talked of Rooney’s “rich, eccentric legacy.” A man who filled American homes “like a piece of the Sunday furniture, like a portrait on the wall, like the TV itself.”

Safer then introduced a video which included outtakes of his interview with Rooney conducted last Spring. Showing a picture of the early correspondents: Harry Reasoner, Mike Wallace and Diane Sawyer, Rooney stopped at Sawyer — who was not able to attend. “She’s the prettiest girl I

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