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Posts Tagged ‘Mitt Romney’

After A Long Campaign, Correspondents At Romney HQ Ready For A Long Night

GOP Presidential candidate Mitt Romney‘s campaign headquarters is about to start filling up in Boston, Massachusetts. For correspondents covering the Romney campaign, today has been a relatively uneventful one in the grand scheme of the campaign, though that will soon change.

“This is the first quiet day we have had in I don’t know how long,” NBC’s Peter Alexander told TVNewser. “Everything has been said, now you just wait and see what America says.”

As the polls close across the country, the network correspondents in Boston are gearing up to try and take the temperature of the Romney camp. While viewers at home get a larger perspective, the view in the campaign headquarters is a unique one.

“The advantage is that you have right at your disposal key people inside the campaign who are telling you what is going on,” CNN’s Jim Acosta told us. “Of course you are being spun, but it is a ringside seat not many people have, and a vantage point that you can share with the world.”

For tonight, correspondents are ready to expect the unexpected, and to go late if need be.

“Just when you have conventional wisdom building or predictions that come into focus on election day, you have to wonder, what will the surprise be tonight,” ABC’s David Muir told us, noting that this campaign has been rife with surprises, from Hurricane Sandy to the “47%” tape.

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A Tie in Dixville Notch as First 2012 Votes are Cast

At Midnight the polls opened in Dixville Notch and Hart’s Location, New Hampshire. And by 12:04am, history was made in Dixville Notch, when the presidential contest ended in a tie. Of the 10 votes cast, President Obama took 5 votes and Mitt Romney took 5 votes. Fox News was live as the voting began. CNN, in a live Midnight edition of “Piers Morgan Tonight” stayed for the vote total with correspondent David Mattingly live in Dixville Notch. MSNBC did not take the early voting live.

The Afternoon Ticker: Monday Night Candidates, Buying Current, Cavuto’s MS

  • As we suspected might happen, Pres. Obama and Mitt Romney will give interviews tonight during the Eagles/Saints Monday Night Football game. The New York Times reports ESPN’s Chris Berman will interview Obama and Romney at halftime.

  • In USA Today today, Michael Wolff asks ‘Who Will Buy Al Gore’s Current TV?’ and sums up: “Current TV is quite a disaster area, never able to clarify its mission, style or business reason for being.”

  • Neil Cavuto on election anchoring and his battle with MS: “The biggest thing I try to do is get engaged in my work and not let what I clearly feel in my body slow me down. I’m well aware of the fatigue issue.”

Pew: MSNBC, Fox News Play Favorites In Tone

A survey from Pew’s Project for Excellence in Journalism shows that when it comes to covering politics, horse-race coverage remains king, and the network viewers watch take drastically different approaches to covering the candidates.

PEJ surveyed cable news segments between August 27 and October 21, and graded them based on the “tone” of the segment. They found that when it came to coverage of President Obama, a clear plurality of segments on Fox News were negative in tone, while a clear plurality of segments on MSNBC were positive. CNN was split almost down the middle. When it came to coverage of Mitt Romney, an overwhelming majority of segments on MSNBC were negative while a plurality on Fox News were positive. A plurality of CNN segments were also negative. You can read the entire report here.

What Your TV Choices Say About Your Politics, And What The Candidates Watch

BuzzFeed has a pair of interesting charts looking at the political persuasions of television viewers. One of the charts compares a handful of TV shows and the other a number of high-profile TV networks, both graph them in accordance with political persuasion, and the likelihood of voting.

Among the findings: Fox News and Fox Business viewers skewed heavily Republican, and were very likely to vote. The Weather Channel and CNBC also skewed Republican. MSNBC and PBS skewed very Democratic, with high turnout. CNN also skewed Democratic. The channels that both parties could agree on were ESPN, Lifetime, Food Network and Discovery Channel.

Among TV shows: HBO’s “The Newsroom” skewed very Democratic, while “Today” was just slightly so. The most Republican-skewing shows were “Deadliest Catch” and “American Pickers.”

As it happens, GOP Presidential candidate Mitt Romney and President Obama told TV Guide about their favorite TV shows. How do they stack up compared to BuzzFeed’s charts?

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MTV Slates President Obama Interview, Invitation Extended To Mitt Romney

MTV will interview President Obama for a live half-hour special to air on the MTV channels Friday at 5 PM. MTV correspondent Sway Calloway will interview Obama in the White House, while Andrew Jenks will be at a nearby college campus watching with young voters. Jenks will also host an online discussion before and after the interview.

MTV will be soliciting questions from viewers on its Facebook page, with Calloway choosing the best ones to ask the President. As for Obama’s GOP challenger Mitt Romney:  ”MTV has invited Governor Romney to participate in a live, 30 minute special as well, and hopes to also conduct a sit down interview with him in advance of Election Day,” said the network in a statement.

Much friendlier than MTV’s cold-hearted colleagues at Nick News. In 2008, Obama participated in a similar MTV forum, while Sen. John McCain declined to appear.

More information:
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Are You Ready For Some Pandering? Obama, Romney Eye ‘Monday Night Football’ Interviews

You thought it was over, didn’t you?

You thought after the final debate, you would be able to turn off the political pandering from Mitt Romney and President Obama. Never again would politicians force you to miss “The Voice” or “How I Met Your Mother.” Well, it isn’t over yet.

According to Sports Business Daily‘s John Ourand, the Romney and Obama camps want to make one final push for voters during ESPN’s “Monday Night Football” game on November 5. You may recall that in 2008, Obama and challenger John McCain appeared in interviews during halftime of the “MNF” game before election day (pictured above).

ESPN has not made a final decision yet, but appears likely to have its longtime NFL studio host Chris Berman interview President Barack Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney during halftime of the Eagles-Saints game Nov. 5, according to Vince Doria, ESPN’s senior vice president and director of news. The campaigns also have expressed an interest in appearing on ESPN’s “Mike and Mike” morning radio show.

“We’ve been approached and are strongly considering doing it again,” Doria said. “If we do those, we will try to treat the candidates in a fair manner and try to find some questions that have a sports connection but have a substance to them.”

Behind The Debates: Style Over Substance

NBC’s “Today” this morning examined what goes on behind the scenes at the debates. Rather than focus on politics, the focus was on the stagecraft. Everything from the ties the candidates wear to the meal they eat beforehand to the zingers that they say “off the cuff” are plotted out in advance.

WATCH:


Elsewhere, the St Louis Post-Dispatch writes about Anheuser-Busch, which plays a key role as the corporate sponsor of the debates. What’s that? You didn’t know that these stalwart elements of democracy had corporate sponsors? Well, they do:

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With ‘Monday Night Football’ And MLB Playoffs, A Ratings Challenge For The Final Debate

The first two Presidential debates were ratings juggernauts, utterly dominating the TV landscape the nights they aired (it helps that it was on nearly a dozen channels). Tonight is the third and final Presidential debate, but while the anticipation may be high, the competition for eyeballs will be fierce.

Two big sporting events are on tap for tonight, “Monday Night Football” on ESPN, and game seven of the MLB National League Championship Game on Fox. The baseball game will result in one fewer broadcast network covering the debate, and fans of the Cardinals, Giants, Lions or Bears will have to choose between watching Obama and Romney spar yet again, or watching their favorite team take home an important win.

Brian Stelter writes in the NY Times that ESPN is trying to convince viewers that they don’t have to choose, they can watch both!

A pair of ads that started appearing on ESPN on Saturday promote the WatchESPN app, which allows subscribers of certain cable companies to watch ESPN on phones and computers at no additional charge.

“This debate will be settled on the gridiron,” one of the ads says, after referencing the verbal battle that will be taking place on a stage in Boca Raton, Fla. The ad concludes, “Don’t miss a minute of Monday Night Football on ESPN, the WatchESPN app and WatchESPN.com.”

 

Obama on Matthews: ‘Four years ago, I gave him a thrill up his leg. This time around, I gave him a stroke’

FNC’s Roger Ailes sits behind Pres. Obama, Gov. Romney and Cardinal Dolan at annual Al Smith dinner.

Pres. Barack Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney set aside their political differences for a few minutes to poke fun at themselves, at each other, and at the media, at the annual Al Smith dinner last night in New York City. But the politicians weren’t the only ones to break bread with their rivals at the event, which this TVNewser attended: media executives and personalities from competing networks mingled over dinner at the Waldorf-Astoria.

The candidates, who sat on either side of Cardinal Timothy Dolan of the New York Catholic Archdiocese, were flanked on the dais by some of the television industry’s most famous faces. Fox News chairman and CEO Roger Ailes sat among two people who have him to thank for their start in TV: on his left, Maria Bartiromo, who Ailes hired at CNBC in 1993, and on his right, one seat away, Chris Matthews, who Ailes hired in 1994 at the network that would become MSNBC. Katie Couric and Fox News legal analyst Peter Johnson, Jr. were also seated on the dais.

MSNBC’s Chris Matthews chats with Roger Ailes.

Both candidates took aim at the media in their lighthearted speeches, which all three of the general cable networks broadcast live.

“I particularly want to apologize to Chris Matthews,” Pres. Obama said of his performance in the first Presidential debate. “Four years ago, I gave him a thrill up his leg. This time around, I gave him a stroke.”

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