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Posts Tagged ‘Nic Robertson’

Malaysia Airlines Jet Shot Down in Ukraine

Malaysia AirlinesCable news networks scrambled this morning to cover a Malaysia Airlines flight that was shot down along the Ukraine/Russia border.

All three broadcast networks provided special coverage of the crash. NBC News cut in at 11:39amET with Matt Lauer and Savannah Guthrie anchoring in New York and Tom Costello reporting from Washington, DC.

CBS News cut in at 11:40amET with Margaret Brennan anchoring in New York and Bob Orr reporting from Washington, DC. ABC News cut in at 11:41amET with David Muir anchoring in New York.

CNN’s John Berman first reported on the crash at 11:22amET. Fox News’ Jon Scott first reported the news at 11:27amET. MSNBC’s Tamron Hall broke the news at 11:33amET. Al Jazeera America has switched to Al Jazeera English to cover the plane crash, live from Moscow.

Developing

>>Update: Reuters is reporting the plane was shot down by militants killing all 295 passengers aboard.
>>Update: Scott Pelley took over for Margaret Brennan at 11:57amET.
>>Update: George Stephanopoulos took over for David Muir at 12:08pmET.
>>Update: Anderson Cooper took over coverage from John Berman at 12:17pmET. Shepard Smith took over coverage from “Outnumbered” at 12:30pmET.
>>Update: Brian Williams took over for Matt Lauer and Savannah Guthrie at 12:59pmET.
>>Update: CNN’s Nic Robertson, Ivan Watson, and Phil Black are en route to Ukraine; Erin McLaughlin is heading to Amsterdam; Matthew Chance is en route to Moscow.
>>Update: CNN is preempting “The Sixties” tonight for special coverage of the Malaysia Airlines crash with Anderson Cooper anchoring from 8pm-10pmET.
>>Update: Malaysia Airlines will hold a press conference at 4pmET.
>>Update: CBS News is sending Foreign Correspondent Mark Phillips to Ukraine; CBS News Correspondent Seth Doane to Malaysia; and CBS News Foreign Correspondent Elizabeth Palmer to Amsterdam.
>>Update: President Obama made a statement at 2:10pmET. The president said the U.S. is currently trying to find out whether there were American citizens on board.
>>Update: CBS ended its special report at 2:30pmET.
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CNN Correspondents Race From NYC to DC

CNN has been reporting on holiday travel, which was snarled by a very large storm making its way across the country. Yesterday they put the three major transportation modes to the test, asking three correspondents to leave New York City at noon and make it to Washington, D.C. in time for “The Situation Room” at 5pmET. Lisa Desjardins took a train, Nic Robertson took a plane and Brian Todd drove. So who made it to D.C. first? Watch and find out:

CNN’s Nic Robertson Pivots From Kenya Mall Shooting to New Jersey Mall Shooting

A strange twist of events for CNN senior international correspondent Nic Robertson, who covered the Westgate mall attack in Nairobi: on his first day of a month-long reporting rotation in the U.S., he was assigned to cover another mall shooting, at the Westfield Garden State Plaza in New Jersey. Robertson was live outside the mall last night.

On “New Day” today, he filed a report on the New Jersey mall shooting, right on the heels of Monday’s report on the hunt for the leader of Al-Shabaab, the group behind the Nairobi mall attack.

Watch both reports below:

CNN Snags Three Foreign Press Association Awards

The Foreign Press Association in London handed out its annual FPA Media Awards this week. The only American news outlet to be honored was CNN, which took home three awards. The awards were for “Print & Web Feature,” “Arts & Culture” and “Story of the Year by an FPA member.” Nic Robertson, Ken Shiffman and Samantha Weihl received the story of the year award for “World’s Untold Stories: Secrets of the Belfast Project.”

The other honorees included Al Jazeera English, which took home an award in the “Environment” category, Britain’s Channel 4, which took home two awards, The Daily Telegraph and Sydney Morning Herald, which each took home one award and the BBC, which took home five awards.

The full results are here.

The Ticker: Robertson, Bloomberg CEOs, Beck Jeans

  • CNN correspondent Nic Robertson has been honored for his work covering the conflict in Syria. Robertson received the Prix Bayeux TV award for a report from the Syrian town of Zabadani earlier in January. The Prix Bayeux honors war correspondents of all stripes.
  • Bloomberg TV is planning a panel discussion of four CEOs during “Street Smart” at 4 PM today. The topic: how to tackle the debt problems facing the U.S. Trish Regan will host, with Honeywell’s David Cote, NASDAQ’s Bob Greifeld, BlackRock’s Larry Fink and UPS’ Scott Davis.
  • GBTV founder and former Fox News host Glenn Beck is getting into the clothing business. Beck’s company is launching a line of jeans (Made in America, natch) under the “1791″ clothing banner. They also created a very memorable commercial, with Beck serving as the voiceover talent. Watch it after the jump.

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The Ticker: O’Reilly/Stewart Debate, Zakaria, Robertson

  • It is already an open secret that Fox News host Bill O’Reilly and Comedy Central host Jon Stewart are buddies when they aren’t debating one another on their respective shows. Now it looks like they will be taking their “rivalry” to the stage, for charity of course.  Cindy Adams explains that they will take part in “a live mock debate rumble, 90 minutes, in DC’s nice air-conditioned George Washington University auditorium. Filmed, available subsequently on DVD, it’ll stream worldwide on the Internet.”
  • Fareed Zakaria returns to CNN Sunday, September 23 with a primetime special with a focus on jobs in America. “Global Lessons: Putting America to Work.” The special looks at what American (and foreign) companies are doing to boost jobs and make the workforce more qualified for high-paying and highly-skilled jobs.
  • Speaking of CNN, foreign correspondent Nic Robertson is back in Syria, reporting from the Capital city of Damascus. Robertson reports on the relative tranquility in the Capital, but also how the civil war continues to creep closer.

CBS News Correspondent Clarissa Ward On The Challenges Of Reporting From Syria

Last week CBS News correspondent Clarissa Ward found herself sneaking out of Syria. The weather wasn’t helping.

“We had a tough crossing because it had been raining all week, the ground was literally just mud, and we were wading through canals and trudging through this mud in the middle of the night,” Ward told TVNewser.

The crisis in Syria continues to escalate, but the government there has been clamping down on journalists, forcing any western news organizations to sneak into the country in order to report on it. The journey into the country is almost as dangerous as the situation itself.

“There are several ways to do it, and several borders to do it through,” Ward recalls. “We went in through Turkey, we were relying heavily on a network of activists willing to risk their lives to make sure that their story gets out there to the world. We actually went in across the border with smugglers, it is a dangerous undertaking.”

The government has opted not to grant any journalism visas, keeping most foreign reporters out. Only those willing to take serious and very real risks are sneaking in. Yesterday the New York Times announced that one of its star reporters, Anthony Shadid, passed away in Syria. Shadid died of an apparent asthma attack. Due to the underground nature of reporting there, quality medical care–or often any medical care–is not easily accessible.

“The Assad regime has been very calculated and cynical in refusing to grant visas to journalists to report independently from inside the country, because they are aware of the fact that if there isn’t information coming out, and if there aren’t impartial observers, journalists on the ground getting information out about many of the atrocities, they will go undocumented,” Ward says. “Journalists will have a very tough time covering the story because they will be relying so much on second or even third hand information.”

The regime briefly granted journalism visas earlier this year, but as Ward notes, any journalists in the country at the time were not getting an accurate picture of the situation there.

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The Ticker: Syria, Atkisson, Valentine’s Polka on ABC

  • CNN, which has been covering the deteriorating situation in Syria more than either of its cable news competitors, according to TVEyes, is planning a primetime special on Saturday on the matter. “Homs: A City Under Siege,” will run on CNN from 10:30-11PM, and will be narrated by CNN correspondent Nic Robertson, who has spent a lot of time in the country this year.
  • CBS News Correspondent Sharyl Atkisson did not attend a controversial award ceremony held by conservative media watchdog group Accuracy in Media at CPAC. CBS News DC bureau chief Chris Isham accepted the award instead, saying that Atkisson was on assignment.
  • On “ABC World News Now” this morning, a Valentine’s Day Polka: 

While Cable News Focuses On Politics, Syria Re-Enters the Spotlight

The cable news channels have seemingly been all politics all the time over the last few days, but it is hardly the only big news happening at the moment. In the Middle East, there is an event that will have a more significant long-term impact than intra-party political sniping: the protests in Syria, and President Assad’s announcement that he will not step down. In addition, a French TV journalist for France 2 TV was killed in a mortar strike in the country.

CNN’s Nic Robertson is in the country on a visa (previously reporters have had to sneak in), and has been giving updates from the divided nation:

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The Death of the Foreign Correspondent? Not So Much

A year ago today we wrote about one of those annual “predictions” stories. It was from Mashable’s Vadim Lavrusik who had a host of predictions for the news media in 2011. This was No. 6:

6. The Death of the ‘Foreign Correspondent’

Lavrusik, who is also an adjunct professor at Columbia University’s journalism school, argued that news organizations would rely “heavily on stringers and, in many cases, social content uploaded by the citizenry.”

How right he was… and wasn’t.

While much of the video from the Arab Spring and Japanese earthquake & tsunami — two of the biggest stories on the planet this year — was user generated: captured on smartphones, uploaded to video sites and shared around the world on social networks, it took the network correspondents to put into perspective what we were seeing, to interview some of those captured on video (or who captured the video), and put into greater context what it all means. That’s really their job. So that at the end of a 1-minute 45-second package or 2-minute live shot, we all have a better understanding of the story.

This year, the networks did not rely “heavily on stringers,” the news was simply too broad and complex and the competition too great. No network wants to be left out.

So they dug deep into their pockets and sent in correspondents and anchors to report what was happening. Brian Williams, Diane Sawyer, Anderson Cooper, Scott Pelley, even Barbara Walters have all traveled the globe this year for their networks. ABC’s Christiane Amanpour racked up more stamps on her passport and NBC’s Richard Engel and CBS’s Lara Logan — who

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