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Polls

Gallup Poll: Trust in Mass Media Reporting Back at ‘All-Time Low’

gallup poll trust in media 2014 copy

A recent Gallup poll shows American’s belief that newspapers, TV and radio report “the news fully, accurately, and fairly” is back at its previous all-time low of 40 percent.

Up until 2003, about half of Americans polled trusted what the the media was telling them. That trust took a big hit in 2004 and seemed to rebound in 2005, but instead has slowly eroded since then.

Even trust among Democrats, who traditionally have more confidence in the media than their counterparts, has dropped to a 14-year low of 54 percent. Republican and Independents, however, stand firm in their overall mistrust, with Republicans staying below the 40 percent mark since 2004 and Independents meeting them there in 2009. You can see that graphic after the jump. Read more

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Poll Results: Would You Turn Over Footage Without a Subpoena?

keytlogoThe results are in from Friday’s double poll. First, we asked if you’d turn over footage your station shot without being forced to do so.

The poll came about after Santa Barbara ABC station KEYT shot riot footage and gave it to the county sheriff without a subpoena.

For the question: Would You Give Police Riot Footage Without Subpoena? A majority of the 280 responders said they disagreed with the station’s actions.

  • NO     67%
  • YES    32%
  • Other 1%

Jim Romenesko who first told the story also pointed out the reporter and the anchor on the desk reporting the story have ties to law enforcement. Reporter Victoria Sanchez‘ father is the Santa Barbara Chief of Police and anchor Paula Lopez is married to a county judge.

For the question: Should Sanchez and Lopez Reveal Their Ties to Law Enforcement When Reporting on Crime? 66 percent of the 92 people who voted think the two should reveal their ties. Read more

Gallup Poll: TV Reporters Not Seen as Very Honest or Ethical by Any Political Party

gallup_304Gallup recently released a poll ranking 22 professions by their perceived honesty and ethics.

The poll was not kind to TV journalists which showed the percentage of responders who ranked professions either very high or high in ethics and honesty.

While more Democrats (25%) and Independents (21%) than Republicans (15%) said TV reporters had a high or very high standard of ethics and honesty, 26 percent of responders between the ages of 18 and 34 said they thought TV reporters were ethical and honest compared to 17 percent of those older than 55.

The winner of the poll spanning both age and party lines ? Nurses. Click here to view the poll results.

STUDY: Local TV News Gets Americans Talking

A recent TVB study shows local TV news is three times more likely than online media to start a conversation among Americans.

“The American Conversation” study asked participants about the details of over 9,000 online and offline conversations in April 2013. The study showed 55% of all “News of the Day” conversations were sparked by television, while online media started just 18%.

Local broadcast television delivers the news that feeds most of these conversations, with 82% of people talking daily about Weather, 75% about National or International News, 63% about Local News, 49% about Sports and 42% about Traffic.  And when it comes to discussing Products and Services, advertising seen on Local Broadcast News is 30% more likely to spark or inform those conversations than that seen on Cable News.

“Despite the belief that young people have disengaged with watching news, young adults claim that Local Broadcast News content drives a higher percentage of their daily conversations than most other television genres – more than Cable News, Sports, and even Primetime programming,” said Stacey Lynn Schulman, chief research officer of the TVB.

The study also said that 77% of daily conversations take place face-to-face as apposed to online (8%).

Study: Journalists More Important Today Than in the Past

A new Pew Study shows a majority of people think TV journalists are more important today than in the past because they “help make sense of all the info that is available.”

However, TVSpy isn’t sure how this relates to the last study that showed fewer Americans thought journalists made a positive contribution to society.

But back to the study at hand. This most recent study showed attitudes about journalists ability to sort through information remained on the positive side of the spectrum regardless of age and political affiliation. Of those polled, the people between the ages of 18 and 49 had the highest percentage of those who thought journalists were “more important” (55%). The lowest came from those 65 and older (52%).

The split between the political parties also weighted the survey. 51% of Republicans felt journalists were more important while Democrats came in at 60%. Read more

Study: More Hispanics Get News in English

A recent study by the Pew Research Hispanic Center says more Spanish speakers are getting their news in English.

That’s good news for local TV stations since the number of Spanish speaking adults who choose television as their main source of news in 2012 is a whopping 86%, a number that’s down from 92% in 2006.

While the number of Hispanic adults surveyed in 2012 who said they got at least some of their news in English held steady at 82% from 2010, the number who chose Spanish language news declined from 76% in 2010 to 68% in 2012. Read more

Poll Results: KTVU Shouldn’t Have Pulled YouTube Video

The results are in on yesterday’s poll asking whether KTVU made the right call in pulling the YouTube video of anchor Tori Campbell reading the fake crew names of the crashed Asiana Airlines flight 214.

Nearly two-thirds of the 432 readers who voted said the San Francisco Bay Area FOX affiliate made the wrong call to claim copyright on the YouTube video.

Smart or Not? KTVU Blocks Fake Pilot Name Video from YouTube

KTVU has made the wrong move     56.94%

KTVU has made the right move        39.81%

Some left us comments disagreeing with the station’s decision. One commenter wrote, “Lame attempt to put the genie back in the bottle.” While another said, “Classic hypocritical thinking. We can report on you but you can’t report on us.”

Have more to say? Please visit our facebook page and leave your comments.

POLL: Smart or Not? KTVU Has Video of Fake Asiana Pilot Names Pulled from YouTube

KTVU is exerting its copyright claim on YouTube videos showing anchor Tori Campbell reading fake names identifying the pilots of Asiana flight 214.

>UPDATE: KTVU vice president and general manager Tom Raponi responded to TVSpy’s question about pulling the videos saying, “The accidental mistake we made was insensitive and offensive.  By now, most people have seen it.  At this point, continuing to show the video is also insensitive and offensive, especially to the many in our Asian community who were offended.  Consistent with our apology, we are carrying through on our responsibility to minimize the thoughtless repetition of the video by others.”

The YouTube videos embedded on media websites, including TVSpy, showing Campbell reading the names ”Captain Sum Ting Wong,” Wi Tu Lo,” “Ho Lee Fuk,” and “Bang Ding Ow,” have been replaced with the notice, “This video is no longer available due to a copyright claim by KTVU.”

While some media bloggers think removing the videos may be the wrong move for the Cox owned San Francisco Bay Area FOX affiliate, we want to know what you think:

Pew Study: Fewer Americans Think Journalists Contribute to Society

The Pew Research Center asked Americans to rate certain professions by their perceived contribution to society.

While the Military ranked highest with more than three-quarters of Americans (78%) saying they think the Armed Forces contribute “a lot” to society, Journalists came in near the bottom with just 28% saying the Press contribute “a lot.” That number is down 10% from 2009, when 38% of Americans viewed Journalists positively.

The survey also broke down whether those polled thought occupations contributed “a lot,” “some,” or “not very much/nothing.” Journalists were split fairly evenly in being perceived as contributing “a lot” or “not very much/nothing.” Most of those polled (42%) thought journalists contributed “some.”

Another interesting take away is that, according to the study, more women have lost faith in the media than men in the last four years. The study shows a 17% drop from 46% of women saying they think journalists contribute to society compared to 29% since 2009.

Click here to view the entire study.

Poll: TV News Still Main Source of News

A recent Gallup poll shows more Americans continue to turn on their TV sets instead of their computers to get their news fix.

The poll shows 55% of those polled say TV News is their main source of news about current events compared to 21% who rely on the internet.

While no specific outlet shows a dominant reach, only 4% of the 2,048 nationwide adults polled name local news as their primary source of info for current events. Read more

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