TVNewser LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllTwitter AllFacebook InsideFacebook InsideSocialGames InsideMobileApps
Vidicom is looking for a TV News Writer. next job Bloomberg LP is looking for a Senior Producer. next job WTKR/WGNT TV is looking for a News Producer. next job KOB - TV is looking for a Morning Executive Producer. next job KGW is looking for a News Producer. next job WPIX11 is looking for a Line Producer. next job NBCUniversal is looking for a Producer, WVIT. next job WKOW TV is looking for a News Director. see all

Posts Tagged ‘Elizabeth Kaledin’

Elizabeth Kaledin Says Goodbye to NY1

elizabeth kaledinElizabeth Kaledin is leaving Time Warner Cable News NY1 to join the Central Park Conservancy, Capital New York’s Alex Weprin reports.

Kaledin is a longtime veteran of NY1 who was worked as a weekend anchor and reporter at the channel when it launched in 1992. She left in 1994 to join CBS News and rejoined NY1 as the 11 p.m. anchor in 2007.

Kaledin anchors alongside Lewis Dodley. After her departure, Dodley will continue to anchor the 11 p.m. newscast solo, Capital reports.

Mediabistro Course

Public Speaking

Public SpeakingStarting August 14,  develop the public speaking skills you need to speak confidently and with authority to engage any audience! In this course, you'll learn how to captivate an audience, walk, gesture, and position your body to convey strength, interact with displays, notes, and PowerPoint presentations and more. Register now! 
 

NYT: NY1 ‘a comforting town square’ During Hurricane Sandy

Local stations in New York City have been in continuing coverage since Hurricane Sandy stormed ashore on Monday. The New York Times’ Jon Caramanica reflects on NY1′s coverage, calling it “a prime-time anchor in the tumult of the storm”:

Over the course of the night, its broadcast became a comforting town square, the coverage not as improvisational as you might expect. The plan seemed to be to find someone — a correspondent, a spokesman, a politician — with something to say, and stick with that person until someone else wanted to speak. One by one, they took their turn, everyone from Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo to Joseph J. Lhota, the chairman of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, to representatives of Con Edison and various local elected officials, speaking at length, and often in detail, and often until cut short by a dial tone or a burst of silence when the connection was lost.

The stars, though, were the reporters in the field and the anchors steering the coverage, Lewis Dodley and Elizabeth Kaledin. The meteorologist John Davitt, in an ocean blue shirt, faced the camera squarely, not in front of a hyperactive map, explaining things serenely through the night.