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Posts Tagged ‘Pew Research Center’

Pew Study: Not Many TV Stations Have Reporters Dedicated to Covering State Politics

PJ-2014-07-10-statehouse-09The Pew Research Center just released a study looking at the coverage of state politics.

According to the study, of the 1,592 statehouse journalists in the US, less than half are full time and 38 percent are print journalists.

Just 14% of the nation’s local television stations with news programs assign a reporter to the statehouse. Overall, television reporters account for 17% of the total statehouse reporting pool, and just 12% of the full-time statehouse reporting corps.

Last September, ABC’s owned stations dissolved its political bureau covering California’s capital for stations in Los Angeles (KABC), San Francisco Bay Area (KGO) and Fresno (KFSN).

Stephen Miskin, spokesman for the Pennsylvania House Republican Caucus and for the speaker and majority leader told researchers, “A lot of people still get their news from TV and they’re not here.”

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Pew: Local TV Audiences Grew in 2013

pew research studyGood news for newsrooms across the country: the local television audience grew in all three major time slots in 2013, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center:

Viewership climbed 6% in the morning (5 to 7 a.m.) and 3% in the early evening (5 to 7 p.m.) newscasts, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis. The audience barely edged up—by .1%—in the late night slot (11 p.m.), a newscast that had suffered the biggest decreases in recent years.

The good news comes after a difficult 2012 when late night and early evening audiences each dropped by 7% and the morning audience decreased by 5%. Indeed, viewership for all three slots had declined every year from 2008-2012—with the exception of a small uptick in 2011. Pew Research analyzes Nielsen Media Research audience data for all four major sweeps periods — February, May, July and November — and computes national averages for each time slot.

Pew reports the viewership increases were the result of a strong November sweeps period: the morning news grew by 12%, evening news was up 8% and late night was up 6%.

Study: Journalists More Important Today Than in the Past

A new Pew Study shows a majority of people think TV journalists are more important today than in the past because they “help make sense of all the info that is available.”

However, TVSpy isn’t sure how this relates to the last study that showed fewer Americans thought journalists made a positive contribution to society.

But back to the study at hand. This most recent study showed attitudes about journalists ability to sort through information remained on the positive side of the spectrum regardless of age and political affiliation. Of those polled, the people between the ages of 18 and 49 had the highest percentage of those who thought journalists were “more important” (55%). The lowest came from those 65 and older (52%).

The split between the political parties also weighted the survey. 51% of Republicans felt journalists were more important while Democrats came in at 60%. Read more

Pew Study: Fewer Americans Think Journalists Contribute to Society

The Pew Research Center asked Americans to rate certain professions by their perceived contribution to society.

While the Military ranked highest with more than three-quarters of Americans (78%) saying they think the Armed Forces contribute “a lot” to society, Journalists came in near the bottom with just 28% saying the Press contribute “a lot.” That number is down 10% from 2009, when 38% of Americans viewed Journalists positively.

The survey also broke down whether those polled thought occupations contributed “a lot,” “some,” or “not very much/nothing.” Journalists were split fairly evenly in being perceived as contributing “a lot” or “not very much/nothing.” Most of those polled (42%) thought journalists contributed “some.”

Another interesting take away is that, according to the study, more women have lost faith in the media than men in the last four years. The study shows a 17% drop from 46% of women saying they think journalists contribute to society compared to 29% since 2009.

Click here to view the entire study.

Pew State of the News Media 2013: ‘Shrinking Pains’ For Local News

Local news is suffering from “shrinking pains,” according to Pew Research Center’s 2013 State of the News Media report. Traffic, weather and sports makes up an increasingly large percent of newscasts, a sign that “there is less in depth journalism being produced,” according to the report.

From the report: Read more

Pew: Nearly Six in Ten Following Newtown Shooting

Despite the scrutiny over media coverage of the Newtown shooting, a new study from the Pew Research Center shows nearly six in ten of those polled said they follow news about the shooting very closely.

The number of those following the coverage very closely (57%) is higher than other recent mass shootings.

While in a separate study conducted between December 14-17, 53 percent of those polled said they were trying to restrict how much coverage their children watched compared to 47 percent who weren’t.

You can see the graphic after the jump.  For the link to the study, click here. Read more

Pew Study Shows Local TV Trails Cable as Source for Campaign News

The Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism just released a study showing 38% of Americans get their campaign news from local TV.  Cable News leads the field with 41% while the internet ranked just below local news with 36%.

However, local TV was not viewed as being all that helpful for digging deep into an election issue.  Asked to name which outlets were seen as “most helpful”, only 11% of those polled chose local TV.  Cable again led the field with 24% choosing it as the place to go to get more information.

After the jump you can view the numbers ranking the major media sources: TV, Internet, Print, Radio and Social Media.  There’s also an interesting graph showing the change in habits since January of 2000. Read more

Pew Study: Television Top Source of Local News

There have been several studies released lately touting the accomplishments of local television newscasts. Now there’s another one to add to the pile: a Pew study released Wednesday finds television to be the top source of local news in both rural and urban areas.

The study is divided into four categories — large cities, suburbs near large cities, small towns or cities and rural areas. Local television tops each category as the most-accessed news source among survey respondents, besting word of mouth, local radio and the print version of a local newspaper.

Local television had its best showing in suburbs near large cities, where 75 percent of respondents said they watched a local newscast at least once per week.  Small towns and rural areas both had 72 percent and urban areas had 65 percent. Read more