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graphic design

Now Read This: Louise Fili’s Grafica della Strada

grafica della strada

fili book sideLouise Fili has done it again. The designer of all things bello, including stunning packaging and branding for the likes of Jean-Georges, Tiffany & Co., and Sarabeth’s, turns her Italophilic eye to signage in the pages of Grafica della Strada: The Signs of Italy, new from Princeton Architectural Press. The chunky yet compact book is a photographic diary of sorts, revealing the most inventive restaurant, hotel, street, and advertising signs spotted by Fili over three decades’ worth of Italian travels. “These signs chart the highs and lows of Italian typography, from a classically elegant gold leaf script for a Turin jewelry store to a very spirited (and unreadable) type rendered in orange and blue dimensional plastic letters for a shop selling doormats in Rome,” notes Fili by way of introduzione. “From the sublime to the ridiculous, each and every one, in its unique way, is dear to me.”

Mediabistro Course

Online Production for Writers and Editors

Online Production for Writers and EditorsStarting October 30, learn how translate your written work into multi-dimensional and editorially relevant digital content! In this course you'll learn how to navigate a CMS, crop, resize, and optimize photos, create graphics, enhance static text through HTML/CSS, and measure the effectiveness of your content using analytics. Register now!

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Infographics (But Were Afraid to Ask)

daniel zeeviReady to respond to requests of “Show me the data!” with more than a sad little bar graph? The Mediabistro mothership is now recruiting would-be data visualizers for an online course in infographics that can “engage an audience in your brand, cause, or mission.” Guided by digital communications pro Amanda McCormick, whose resume includes projects with New York City Ballet, Bitly, and Bertlesmann, students will get up to speed with online tools (we’re looking at you Many Eyes) and develop a robust spec for a data visualization. The infographical fun starts today. Learn more here.

Learn Infographics and Party Like a Chart Star

daniel zeeviReady to respond to requests of “Show me the data!” with more than a sad little bar graph? The Mediabistro mothership is now recruiting would-be data visualizers for an online course in infographics that can “engage an audience in your brand, cause, or mission.” Guided by tech-meets-branding whiz Amanda McCormick, whose resume includes work with organizations such as New York City Ballet, Bitly, and SocialFlow, students will get up to speed with online tools (we’re looking at you Many Eyes) and develop a robust spec for a data visualization. The infographical fun starts Tuesday, October 7. Learn more here.

Go West: Louise Sandhaus on Graphic Design, California Style

earthquakesTo understand the shape-shifting nature of the California design scene, look no further than earthquakes, mudslides, fires, and riots. These natural and manmade disasters endemic to the Left Coast provide the cataclysmic title of a forthcoming book by Louise Sandhaus. The designer and CalArts faculty member focuses on five decades—1936 to 1986—that span Alvin Lustig to Deborah Sussman, from Saul Bass‘s mod film titles to Atari video games, with pit stops at Disneyland propaganda posters, Alexander Girardiana, and early animated abstractions for Robert Abel and Richard Taylor‘s bubbly 7-Up ad of the 1970s.

CalArts students are picking up where the book—out November 30 from Metropolis Books—leaves off by identifying, researching, and documenting neglected designers in Sandhaus’s “Making History” course. Their findings will be compiled in a new website dedicated to California design history. “Earthquakes is a conversation starter,” says Sandhaus. “I want to inspire others to add to the history of California design. There’s a lot of ‘wow’ work and makers that are going to end up in the dustbin of history if documentation doesn’t happen.”
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Inside Louise Fili’s Elegantissima Exhibit

Before we could say “Gelato Fiasco,” Elegantissima: The Design and Typography of Louise Fili had opened and closed at the Art Directors Club in NYC. If you missed the show’s two-week run, which wrapped up Friday in a evening pleasant prosecco haze, all is not perso. The series of thematic interiors, designed by the incomparable Kevin O’Callaghan and sure to inspire a run on violet-hued fainting couches, live on in a short film (below). We suggest following this taste of Fili’s brand of la dolce vita with her stunningly beautiful new book, Grafica della Strada: The Signs of Italy, published earlier this month by Princeton Architectural Press.

Wanted: Designer to Blind Them with Science

man of science.jpgDo you excel at explaining phenomena ranging from plate tectonics to nuclear fission using only a pen and a dinner napkin? Doodle double helices—and their accompanying nucleotides? Then listen up, because the American Association for the Advancement of Science (or “triple-A S,” as the cool kids call it) is looking for a new visual Einstein to join the creative marketing team for its flagship journal, Science, at its Washington, D.C., headquarters. Need you be able to tell xylem from phloem, ventricles from atria, a chupacabra from an exasperated kangaroo? Probably not, but be ready to describe how your “strong communication skills and excellent type sensibility” will react with your “ability to create effective, visually exciting print and electronic media” to keep the visual standards of Science as high as its impact factor. And don’t forget to balance your equation.

Learn more about this junior graphic designer, American Association for the Advancement of Science job or view all of the current mediabistro.com design/art/photo jobs.

Milton Glaser Versus Global Warming

glaser gwIf you, too, had the best of intentions but just couldn’t manage to sit through the PowerPoint deck-plus-Al-Gore-on-a-plane-B-roll that is An Inconvenient Truth, Milton Glaser has boiled down “global warming” and “climate change” into a new campaign that calls out these terms as the clumsy euphemisms they are. The bottom line: “It’s not warming, it’s dying.”

With his signature inform-and-delight tactics, Glaser pairs this grim yet clear-eyed slogan with a roiling green orb that suggests the planet Earth viewed from space—as its expanse of life-sustaining terrain recedes into blackness. On Friday the message debuted as a billboard at New York’s School of Visual Arts, where Glaser serves as a faculty member and acting chairman of the board (look for the billboard on the western exterior wall of SVA’s East 23rd Street building). Spread the word—and the orb—in button form: available in $5 sets of five here. SVA also plans to distribute free buttons on college campuses nationwide.

SVA to Honor Tom Geismar with ‘Masters Series’ Retrospective

(Art Beach)It’s a good year to be Tom Geismar. He and partner (and fellow graphic design legend) Ivan Chermayeff are the 2014 recipients of the National Design Award for lifetime achievement, but even before they pick up their chunky glass asterisks at the Cooper Hewitt’s awards gala in October, Geismar will get the retrospective treatment at New York’s School of Visual Arts. A panel of his peers has selected Geismar to be the 2014 SVA Master Series honoree, joining a roster of past laureates that includes Chermayeff, Saul Bass, Steven Heller, Duane Michals, and Paula Scher. In addition to his logo designs for the likes of Mobil, Chase Manhattan Bank, National Geographic, PBS, Rockefeller Center, Univision, NYU, and Xerox, the exhibition will feature personal works, books, and student projects from Geismar’s own collection.

“The Masters Series: Tom Geismar” opens August 25 at the SVA Chelsea Gallery in NYC.

Wanted: Art Director to Do a Capital Job

washingtonian mag coverThere’s more to Washington D.C. than monuments, symmetry, and Frank Underwood. Locals read all about it in the pages of Washingtonian, and as the magazine approaches its fiftieth anniversary is in want of a new art director for its flagship publication as well as the offshoots Washingtonian Bride & Groom, Washingtonian MOM, and Washingtonian Welcome Guide. Bring your strong editorial design experience, passion for magazines, and “the ability to balance multiple projects in a highly collaborative environment while problem-solving under tight deadlines.”

Learn more about and apply for this art director, Washingtonian magazine job or view all of the current mediabistro.com design/art/photo jobs.

Seven Questions for Jessica Hische

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“The basis of any word is a single letter,” says self-described “letterer, illustrator, and crazy cat lady” Jessica Hische, known for performing stunningly beautiful typographical feats for the likes of Wes Anderson, Penguin Books, The New York Times, and—be still our justice-loving hearts—John Hodgman. Among her latest projects is a stationery collection for the Luxe Project, a Moo initiative that pairs top creative talent with Moo’s deluxe business cards, letterheads, and notecards, and then gives 100% of net proceeds to the designer’s charity of choice (Hische’s feline-friendly pick: the ASPCA). She made time in her busy, bicoastal—San Francisco and Brooklyn—schedule to answer our questions about the luxe letterforms adapted from her Daily Drop Cap project, her book jacket for The Circle by Dave Eggers, and more.

For those not familiar with Daily Drop Cap, what is it and how did it come about?
I started Daily Drop Cap because, when I left working at Louise Fili Ltd., I wanted an excuse to draw letterforms every day, even when I wasn’t being paid to by clients. I wanted a way to experiment and develop my lettering skills since I was about to step out on my own, away from the daily mentoring of Louise. Originally, I had planned on doing an alphabet a week instead of a letter a day, but decided quickly that I wasn’t up for a challenge that enormous at the time. I gave myself the goal of twelve alphabets, a number that seemed daunting but doable, and for a year and a half I drew a letter every single day. It ended up becoming the thing that really kicked my career into full swing and made people pay attention to the work I was doing.

JL moo luxeWhat did you create for the Luxe Project?
My collection for Moo uses a selection of my Daily Drop Caps, transforming the original artwork into sophisticated monograms by switching the complex original color palettes to two-color. I chose letters that I thought would appeal to many people—sometimes the letters I created for Daily Drop Cap specifically referenced something I was doing that day and wouldn’t work as stationery monograms— and tried to pick gender neutral letterforms when possible. The letters are integrated into simple but beautiful designs which could work for anyone, be they a designer or just a lover of letters. I used the typeface Router—which I love—made by a type design friend Jeremy Mickel.

What led you to select the ASPCA to receive all net proceeds?
I adopted my two cats from the ASPCA in New York and just love what they do to put misplaced animals in good homes. I’m a huge animal lover—it’s embarrassing how much I dote on my two cats—and love supporting an organization that obviously cares so deeply about animals.
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