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Posts Tagged ‘Vogue’

In Brief: Meet Mike Friton, Pinterest Raises $200 Million, IMG for Sale, Adieu ALT

• Nike veteran Mike Friton gets his close-up in “The Innovator” (above), a video portrait by Portland-based Cineastas.

• Elsewhere in visually astute videos, Scott “The Sartorialist” Schumann paused in his prowling the streets for stylish sportcoats to interview Magnum photographer Steve McCurry. Click here to watch part one of the five-part chat.

• Pinterest has raised a new $200 million round of funding. The cash infusion brings the virtual scrapbooking company’s valuation up to $2.5 billion.

• Look for Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week parent company IMG to change hands. Private equity firm Forstmann Little & Co. is planning to sell the sports and modeling talent agency.

Adieu, Mondays with André. Vogue‘s very own caped crusader, André Leon Talley, is leaving the magazine.
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Eye Spy: Vogue Fashion Editors Tell Their Stories in HBO Documentary

Vogue is going all out for its 120th anniversary. Following a triumphant turn on the big screen in R.J. Cutler’s 2009 The September Issue, the magazine is out with a stunning coffee table book that celebrates the work of legendary Vogue fashion editors such as Grace Coddington (who is having quite a year), Polly Mellen, Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele, and Babs Simpson. These behind-the-scenes figures also take center stage in a new documentary, In Vogue: The Editor’s Eye, now airing on HBO.

Produced and directed by docu-maestros Fenton Bailey and Randy Barbato, the film is a feast of interviews about famous Vogue images (Mellen steals the show with a moving recollection of her now-famous 1981 shoot with Richard Avedon, a naked Nastassia Kinski, and a Burmese python) and musings on the slippery role of a fashion editor, all artfully combined with a running chronology of the magazine through the ages, including the servicey Mirabella interregnum of 1971-1988. “The people who are responsible for the fashion images are the fashion editors,” says a Prada-clad Anna Wintour. “They have always been our secret weapon, so it seemed to me that we could celebrate Vogue, and also, at the same time, celebrate these great editors.”

Vogue’s Grace Coddington on Avant-Garde Fashion: ‘You Have to Have a Bit of Fun in Life’

When Vogue creative director Grace Coddington first watched the 2009 documentary The September Issue, she was in total shock. “There was way too much of me in the film,” explains Coddington in her memoir, Grace, out today from Random House. “Now I can look at the end result and laugh. After all, I was rather outspoken. Nevertheless, there really is way too much of me.” In doing press for the film, she not only became much more recognizable, to the point that fans gathered in front of her Chelsea apartment building (“I felt like the Beatles,” she writes. “Actually, better than the Beatles, because the crowds chasing them in the early days of their fame could get rough.”), but also found herself looking back over an extraordinary life and career. “It got me thinking…that maybe I had a bigger story to share.”

That story, told over some 400 pages and annotated with Coddington’s charming pen-and-ink illustrations, now pushes the reluctant celebrity back into the spotlight. Among the first stops on her press tour was NPR, where she chatted yesterday with Fresh Air’s Terry Gross about her early life in Wales, career as a model (interrupted by a car accident), and all things Vogue. Alas, the interview (click below to listen to the full segment) inevitably devolved to Gross asking a variant of the “But who really wears that stuff?” question. Coddington’s response:

You know, you have to have a bit of fun in life, and that’s why they [designers] do it, and they do it to get your attention. They do the extreme ones. When you go back to their showrooms, you’ll find the more commercial versions of that, but it’s to get across a point. You have to say it in a strong way to get across a point. So if you want to go short, they go very, very, very short on the runway. But you’ll find in the showroom, it’ll be a reasonable short, you know, that you can wear. So there’s always the commercial version. And equally, we photograph both. We photograph the more commercial things, and we photograph the extreme things because–for the same reason. In order to make the point, you have to say it strongly, so people can see the difference between this season and the last season, and, you have to feed them the information. If you’re too subtle about it, you’re not going to get it.

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The Elder Statesman’s Greg Chait Wins $300K CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund Prize


CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund winner Greg Chait with runners-up Tabitha Simmons and Jennifer Meyer Maguire. (Photo: CFDA)

Greg Chait has a golden goose. OK, technically it’s a bronze swan, but you get the idea. The French-born, New York-based designer was presented with the Rachel Feinstein-designed avian trophy by actress (and Vogue cover girl) Emma Stone on Tuesday evening at New York’s Center548, where the Council of Fashion Designers of America and Vogue announced the recipients of the ninth annual awards from the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund. Chait, who helms Los Angeles-based cashmere label The Elder Statesman, bested nine other finalists to take home the $300,000 Fashion Fund prize and a steady stream of business mentoring from industry veterans.

Runner-up honors–$100,000 each and a lovely bronze egg–went to accessories designers Tabitha Simmons and Jennifer Meyer Maguire. The other finalists were Andrea Lieberman (A.L.C.), Greg Armas (Assembly New York), Sofia Sizzi (Giulietta), Justin Salguero, Daniel Silberman, and Alina Silberman (Illesteva), Jennifer Fisher (Jennifer Fisher Jewelry), Max Osterweis and Erin Beatty (Suno), and Wes Gordon. Get to know them better by tuning into The Fashion Fund, a seven-part series that premiered on Vogue.com last month. Here’s the climactic final installment, complete with footage of the judges’ deliberations and Tuesday’s awards ceremony.

How Brad Goreski Got an Internship at Vogue

Brad Goreski wasn’t always the beacon of style he is today. In our Media Beat interview, the star of It’s a Brad, Brad World revealed that he had to overcome a lack of access (he’s originally from a tiny town in Canada) and the doubts of others to climb to the top. One college career counselor, in particular, was quite taken aback by a young Goreski’s outsize ambition.

“She’s like, ‘Okay, so what do you wanna do?’ And I’m like, ‘I’m gonna get an internship at Vogue in New York.’ And she was like, ‘Excuse me?’ And I’m like, ‘I’m gonna get an internship at Vogue. Is that possible for me to get credit and go to New York?’ And she was like, ‘If you get the internship…’ And I was like, ‘Okay!’” Goreski told us. “And I came back later with all my paperwork, and she was like, ‘Are you really going to New York?’ I’m like, ‘Yeah! I’m going to work at Vogue!’”

Now, with a hit show on Bravo and Born to Be Brad: My Life in Style So Far due in bookstores in March, the taste maker credits those early work experiences for his success.

“Internships are so instrumental but, not only do you need to get them, you need to work at them,” he said.

Part 1: Breakout Styling Star Brad Goreski Takes Us Inside His Brad, Brad World
Part 2: Brad Goreski Sets the Record Straight on His Relationship with Rachel Zoe