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Music

Bob Marley Rises Up on Billboard’s Social 50 Chart

BillboardLogoAre you familiar with Billboard magazine’s Social 50 chart? If not, here’s an explanation of what it tracks:

A ranking of the most active artists on the
world’s leading social networking sites. Artists’ popularity is determined by a formula blending their weekly additions of friends/fans/followers along with artist page views and weekly song plays, as measured by Next Big Sound.

Miley Cyrus, Justin Timberlake and Katy Perry are currently 1-2-3. But, as per a report by the magazine’s social/streaming charts manager William Gruger, there’s also some noteworthy activity down below:

Bob Marley, who has the second-largest social media presence for a dead artist (behind Michael Jackson), reaches a new peak on the Social 50 chart. He rises 37 to 8 in his 88th week on the list, marking the third time Marley has climbed into the top 10.

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Journo Challenges Courtney Love’s Recollection of ‘Pugilistic’ Events

One of the more entertaining celebrity interviews published this week was a Q&A in LA Weekly with Courtney Love. The singer-songwriter-troublemaker was in free-wheeling form for a telephone interview with “West Coast Sound” reporter Lina Locaro, talking about her stripper days, a key early review from Robert Hilburn in the LA Times and more.

However, judging by reaction in the comments from Belissa Cohen, who once wrote the Weekly‘s influential “L.A. Dee Da” column, the Q&A should be taken with a large grain of salt. To Love’s account of how an altercation with the journalist went down, Cohen had this to say:

Courtney has always felt free to make up “truths” and history and in this interview she does it again. I never had a cousin who worked for Gloria Allred, who I had never met before (I cold-called her office) but who gladly took my case against the oft-violent Ms. Love; I never shoved Courtney (she is much taller and bigger than I am), and what she says she said to me during the altercation that she instigated is not at all what she said.

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Metta World Peace Rolls Out New Rap Single

The first wave of reaction is in for “Peace,” a new rap debuted this week on New York’s Hot 97 by incoming Knickerbocker Metta World Peace.

There’s faint praise from Dime magazine (“Metta World Peace is still probably one of the 10 best rappers among NBA players”); a minor spoiler from NBA.com (“The song ends with a fake crowd chanting “world peace”); and more faint praise from thedrop.fm (“The track actually isn’t that bad.”).

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New Jersey Rapper Wonders: ‘Who Let the D*****bags In?’

Musical artist Oh Snap!! spells out the D-word in the title of his tuneful single and choruses it colorfully throughout. The asterisking here is simply a reflection of the fact that despite today’s common Internet usage, we feel the term is still derogatory enough not to be written out.

Which brings up this first question: Is the song title “Who Let the D*****bags In?” going to be offensive to some, many? Even though the tone and multiple-role content of the video itself is clearly meant to amuse? The Teaneck, NJ rapper’s latest offering arrives August 6 from Radikal Records and includes an optional “full song package” of seven remixes by Bombs Away, J. Rabbit, The Mane Thing and others.

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Lou Reed Reviews Kanye West

And really, what else do you need to know?

The review appears on NYC-based The Talkhouse’s beta website and is a must-read. It doesn’t matter if you have already, plan to or never will listen to Kanye’s newest. Yeezus, people; this is Lou Reed reviewing! From Lou’s first para:

There are moments of supreme beauty and greatness on this record, and then some of it is the same old shit. But the guy really, really, really is talented. He’s really trying to raise the bar. No one’s near doing what he’s doing, it’s not even on the same planet.

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The Fader‘s Andy Cohn: ‘Great content first, figure out where it goes second’

With a bimonthly print publication, podcasts and a robust website and online store, The Fader has succeeded as a brand by allowing each of its outlets to have its own style, says Andy Cohn, president and publisher of Fader Media.

“We saw a lot of other music publications trying to become websites and just becoming very busy and very formulaic,” Cohn told Mediabistro for its latest So What Do You Do? interview. “For us, we let our website be the website and let the magazine play to its own strengths, both from a visual — design, photography — and medium- to longer-form journalism standpoint. The approach that we’ve always taken is great content first, and then figure out how and where it goes second. And we’ve always been willing to let our readership play a role in that, because we’re not going to ever be married to one medium.”

For more, read So What Do You Do, Andy Cohn, President and Publisher of The Fader?

Nicholas Braun

Pitchfork Founder on the Loss of Music Magazines

Way back in 1995, Ryan Schreiber was a high school graduate working as a record store clerk. Finding little on the Internet about indie music, he decided to start his own Web page and launched Pitchfork. With no publishing experience, the site eventually became the online authority on indie music, and nowadays a review there can make or break a career.

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do? series, Schreiber discusses what the success of sites like his means for print music magazines.

“I think if you’re going to be able to do a print publication that works in 2013, it has to really take advantage of that format, and the things that that format offers that are much more difficult to execute on the Web are having really expansive, beautiful layouts for your articles and features and making it feel like a desirable object.”

He continued, “It used to be that when you picked up a music magazine in, like, the 90s there was all this cheap, chintzy content thrown in there and goofy sidebars and just sort of filler, almost. And it’s really just not an option anymore. I feel like if people are willing to make an investment in a music magazine — or in a magazine of any sort, currently — they want something that feels substantial and feels significant. It’s not a joke. It’s a real thing.”

Read the full interview in So What Do You Do, Ryan Schreiber, Founder and CEO of Pitchfork?

Legendary Country Programmer Ed Salamon: ‘The Time is Always Right’ for Country in NYC

It’s official: New York’s Country station is now WNSH/NASH FM 94.7. The temporary WRXP call letters now belong to a station in Minnesota.

The newly acquired Cumulus station made the historic move to Country last week. Now, the nationwide search begins for an air staff and a combination program director/air personality.

Ed Salamon knows all about programming Country in New York. During the latter half of the 1970s Salamon was in charge at WHN, the most successful Country station New York has ever heard.

The timing was right for a Country return, and also for Salamon to write a book detailing his memories from the WHN days. While he puts the finishing touches on the book, due out next month, it’s a perfect opportunity to pick Salamon’s brain about NASH.

Salamon, who lives in Nashville, took advantage of the Web site’s streaming live feature. Waiting another month or two before NASH starts to use live jocks, Salamon cautions anyone from being critical as this isn’t the final product.

“I can’t be listening and commenting on it, because it’s going to be something different,” Salamon says.

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Marking New Year’s Eve at Times Square Without Dick Clark

The world is poised to celebrate another New Year’s Eve in Times Square. But this one will be unlike any in the last forty years, as there will be no Dick Clark preceding over the all-important ball drop.

Clark died in April at the age of 82. He suffered a massive heart attack, and was dealing with the complications from a stroke since 2004.

For the majority of his decades in the business, Clark’s boyish looks kept his title “Oldest Living Teenager” intact. He was synonymous with New Year’s Eve since creating his Rockin’ Eve special to usher in 1973. He marked his 40th anniversary with the holiday program just months before his death.

The show must go on, as New Year’s Eve goes on without Clark, and his beloved show continues his legacy and to bear his name.

In recent years, tourists or anyone else venturing to the Times Square Visitors Center, or online, were asked to write notes to help ring in the New Year that would be used as confetti.

This year, people are encouraged to leave fond farewells to Clark.

Tim Tompkins, Times Square Alliance president, says approximately 400 messages were left for the broadcasting icon. Those hand-written notes came from people from as far as away as Fiji and Yemen. Overall, they receive thousands of well-wishers year-round on various topics.

Tompkins tells FishbowlNY that Clark played a major psychological role when New York needed it most.

“For many decades, this was one of the few positive images that went out to the rest of the country of New York City and Times Square, Tompkins says. “This is the time you had Midnight Cowboy, you had Taxi Driver.” Read more

Cavalconte: Dave Brubeck Brought ‘Real Stardom’ to Jazz Scene

Dave Brubeck was composer and pianist, but that barely scratches the surface of his illustrious career. Brubeck passed away yesterday in a Norwalk, Connecticut hospital. He was one day shy of turning 92.

Jazz and Brubeck were one and the same. He spanned the entire jazz scene in America after World War II. He formed the Dave Brubeck Quartet in 1951. By 1954, Brubeck reached a historic milestone when he was chosen as the first modern jazz musician to grace the cover of Time magazine.

If Time was Brubeck’s “arrival,” his popularity reached its zenith with the seminal album Time Out in 1959. It marked the first jazz LP to crack 1 million in sales.

The album includes Brubeck’s signature piece Take Five, which also became the quartet’s theme.

Paul Cavalconte played Take Five and other Brubeck riffs during his stint at WQCD.

“Take Five” was the most covered original jazz title on CD 101.9,” Cavalconte tells FishbowlNY. “I think we played about five or six versions, counting the original.”

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