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Posts Tagged ‘Jenna Wortham’

Brands Rush to Sign the Latest Social Media Stars as Ambassadors

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Hundreds of young people with a bit of time on their hands are now moving to turn their mastery of social media into legitimate careers with backing from big brands–and The New York Times is ON IT.

A couple of stories this weekend highlighted the ways in which these social artisans have begun turning their Vines and YouTubes into cold, hard cash–while helping some businesses stay relevant with core demos in the process.

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Here’s How Tech Journalists Choose Which Startups To Cover

Shutterstock: bringing stereotypes to life since 2003.

And now for a piece that every PR pro whose firm has ever represented a startup should read this weekend. Yesterday Jenna Wortham, tech reporter for The New York Times, wrote a cool interactive story speculating on which startups might blow up in coming months. Then, in what could only be seen as an act of charity to the tech PR world, she followed up with a post about how, exactly, she and journalists like her choose which startups to cover.

So what’s the secret? Let’s summarize:

AT&T/T-Mobile USA Deal Getting Bad Press

AT&T execs sounded confident on a conference call hosted on Monday to explain the goodness of their plan to purchase T-Mobile USA. That optimism will have to hold up against the hits the deal is taking as it heads to Washington for consideration.

Media outlets have reported on the possible ramifications and the very real opposition to the acquisition all week (and it’s only Wednesday).  The New York Times reports on some analyst predictions that the merger will result in consumers paying more for service.

“The bottom line, they said, is that competition is likely to suffer, leading to higher prices and less innovation,” Jenna Wortham writes. Other analysts have a more optimistic outlook, saying that service and coverage could improve.

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Foursquare Founder on PR: “It Pretty Much Takes Care of Itself”

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Mobile social network and gaming application Foursquare has received quite a bit of hype since launching at last year’s SXSW Conference. Despite only 60k users, no revenue and no business model, the company has emerged as one of the next hot things that may not yet have the user base of a Facebook or Twitter, but has the “right users,” some may argue. It also has the “hip factor” as being the network that your parents haven’t yet joined, (Hello, Facebook.) and isn’t consumed mostly for business and link sharing (Hello, Twitter.)

The company is the focus of a New York Times feature story and Bits blog post today – coverage most tech start ups of Foursquare’s size would kill for. Writes the TimesJenna Wortham, “A combination of friend-finder, city guide and competitive bar game, Foursquare lets users ‘check in’ with a cellphone at a bar, restaurant or art gallery. That alerts their friends to their current location so they can drop by and say hello.”

Despite all the attention, founder Dennis Crowley tells PRNewser that all PR is handled “in house” and “it pretty much takes care of itself.” Has the company been pitched by agencies? “Nothing formally,” said Crowley, “[I] got some emails here and there, but been too busy to keep up.” The company’s press page is bare bones, featuring only an email contact and several logos for download.

Times Launches Etiquette Column, “Internet Protocol”

Is it rude to deny your boyfriend’s Mom’s friend request on Facebook? What do do you when you accidentally tweet your phone number? These are the kinds of questions The New York Times‘ new etiquette column, “Internet Protocol” hopes to answer.

Times reporter Jenna Wortham, who will edit the column, tells PRNewser, “The rise of social media and the Internet has completely changed the way we communicate with each other, which is amazing, but its also resulted in an entirely new generation of social situations which can be very tricky to navigate.”

Wortham says the questions will be answered, “by consulting with experts on the topics and using our own personal experiences.” She adds, “It should be a lot of fun.” Have a question? Email or Tweet it to Jenna.