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Posts Tagged ‘John Bell’

Pharma Marketers: FDA Taking Too Long Developing Social Media Guidelines

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The FDA held public hearings just last week to discuss establishing guidelines for pharmaceutical marketers operating in the new world of social media. Already some are complaining that the process is taking too long.

“Does the FDA get it?” If it did, “they wouldn’t be having this meeting now, many, many months after it was already apparent how quickly Web communications is changing,” Mark Senak, author of the blog Eye on FDA and a senior vice-president at Fleishman-Hillard told BusinessWeek.

John Bell, President of the Board of Word of Mouth Marketing Association and Managing Director, Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide agreed that things will take a while. “We’re spending time today in initial discussions that is as much about how the process should unfold as it is what should be the precise guidelines,” he told PRNewser last week.

Ogilvy’s John Bell: FDA Social Media Guidelines Will “Basically Follow Same Process” As FTC Blogging Guidelines

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John Bell, President of the Board of Word of Mouth Marketing Association and Managing Director, Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide, was one of the last presenters today at the FDA’s public hearings on “Promotion of FDA-Regulated Medical Products Using the Internet and Social Media Tools.” We caught up with Bell late yesterday to get his take on the proceedings.

Asked about how much of the hearings pertained to advertising and how much pertained to PR, Bell said, “Today’s stated focus is about what guidelines should be developed for social media, which is this netherworld in between paid and earned media. Unfortunately it covers all grounds.”

Part of the problem, Bell said, is that health-care marketers, “can’t jam all the crap you put into a print ad into a tweet.” So, what is end game with all of this? “We’re spending time today in initial discussions that is as much about how the process should unfold as it is what should be the precise guidelines.” PRNewser’s takeaway: this is going to take a while.

Bell and WOMMA were heavily involved in the recently issued FTC guidelines around disclosure in social media. Drafts for those guidelines were posted for comment late last year, he said, and the final draft came out in October. “I think what will happen with the FDA, is basically to kind of follow the same process,” he said.

All Eyes on D.C. As FDA Begins Hearings on Pharma and Social Media

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Hundreds of advertising, marketing and public relations executives have gathered in Washington, D.C. today for FDA public hearings on “Promotion of FDA-Regulated Medical Products Using the Internet and Social Media Tools.” The hearings are just one step in the FDA’s process to develop policy and guidelines for pharmaceutical companies looking to use social media to promote their products.

“What’s happening is these new media are emerging at an increasingly rapid rate, and are being regulated by an agency that moves very slowly…In essence, you have a regulatory communication crisis developing,” attorney Mark Senak, who advises drug companies as a consultant for Fleishman-Hillard, told the Associated Press.

PR executives speaking at the hearings include Peter J. Pitts, Partner/Director, Global Healthcare, Porter Novelli, Peter Nalen, President, Compass Healthcare Communications, Rick Wion, Vice President of Social Media, GolinHarris, Rohit Bhargava, Senior Vice President, Digital, Strategy & Planning Group, Ogilvy 360 Digital Influence and John Bell, President of the Board of Word of Mouth Marketing Association and Managing Director, Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide.

A full list of speakers is available via the FDA’s website, in addition to a live video stream of the hearings. Naturally, there is also a Twitter hash-tag, #fdaSM.

Razorfish, Ogilvy PR Launch Social Media Measurement Offerings

Two agencies, one with roots in the advertising world (Razorfish) and one with roots in PR (Ogilvy PR) launched new social media measurement and scoring offerings today. Both play off the well-known concept of a brand’s “Network Promoter Score,” which is described by Wikipedia as the following:

Companies obtain their Net Promoter Score by asking customers a single question on a 0 to 10 rating scale: “How likely is it that you would recommend our company to a friend or colleague?”. Based on their responses, customers can be categorized into one of three groups: Promoters (9-10 rating), Passives (7-8 rating), and Detractors (0-6 rating). The percentage of Detractors is then subtracted from the percentage of Promoters to obtain a Net Promoter score. A score of 75% or above is considered quite high.

Advertising Age‘s Abbey Klaassen was briefed on both of the new tools and writes about the Razorfish solution:

Perhaps the closest to a social-web-based Net Promoter Score is something Razorfish plans to introduce this week: the SIM score, which stands for social influence marketing. Razorfish hopes SIM, in fact, becomes a standard as big as a Net Promoter score. It’s a reflection of the total share of consumer conversations a brand has online and the degree to which consumers like or dislike the brand when they talk about it. The agency envisions marketers will track it over time and that it will correlate to business results.

And the Ogilvy solution:

Ogilvy PR today will also launch a formula for calculating what it calls “conversation impact.” It’s meant to determine not the overall social-media health of a brand but rather the impact of a particular campaign. It’s already using the tool, which takes into account reach at the top of the funnel, preference in the middle of the funnel and action at the bottom, to help evaluate a Tropicana campaign.

“We’re basically paying attention to all the positive word-of-mouth for a brand and through a very simple Net Promoter-esque formula can report out [whether we] did increase preference for the brand” OgilvyPR’s digital-influence group managing director John Bell told Klaassen.

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