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Posts Tagged ‘Nokia’

To Handle the Visual Social Content Vortex, Brands Seek Balance

Palo Alto Egg Sculpture FinalWhile U.S. residents experienced the polar vortex this winter, another whirlwind phenomenon has surrounded the social media world in recent years: the surge of visual social content. Images and videos have become content’s hot currency, even surpassing text. Twitter’s redesign adds visuals, while platforms like Instagram, Vine and Pinterest continue to grow.

A Social Media Week New York session on Thursday addressed this shift. The Huffington Post’s executive tech editor Bianca Bosker moderated, and panelists included Craig Hepburn, Nokia‘s global head of digital and social media, Will Palley, JWT’s trends strategist, and Apu Gupta, CEO/co-founder at visual analytics firm Curalate.

As with other media transitions, visual content’s rise involves upsides and downsides. The panelists said those need to be weighed, since visual content poses as many challenges as it solves. They also outlined ways companies can leverage the swirling visual wave.

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Brands Turn Apple’s iPhone Release Into Promo Opp

Yesterday was prime time for pseudo-”brandjacking” exercises as the marketing/social media teams for multiple brands used Apple’s product launch as an excuse to push their own products…even if they have nothing to do with smartphones. Denny’s easily wins for best out-of-nowhere tweet:

Windows went predictably snarky on its rival, trying to turn its #TimetoSwitch tag into a trend:

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Has the Apple Brand Lost Its Edge? (Yes, It Has.)

It’s tough to be a luxury brand—no, really. Just ask Apple, whose “most important thing in the world ever” iPhone rollout seemed designed to appeal to both lower and higher-end consumers but failed to impress either (according to the tech blogs).

There were no surprises today. The products were pretty much what we expected: there was the “cheaper” 5C phone (which is still expensive once you consider monthly data fees, etc.) and the “fancier” 5S phone with “a better camera” and the much-touted “Touch ID” technology that allows you to unlock your phone by touching the screen rather than typing and swiping. The rumored gold phone is real, but it’s not really fabulous. Oh, and there’s yet another new operating system. iTunes Radio could be cool, but again it’s nothing new, and to many this all feels like Apple trying to catch up to its competitors.

What happened?

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How Charitable Is Facebook’s ‘Internet for All’ Project?

Internet.org sounds like the most noble kind of charity organization: designed to bring broadband to the four billion-plus people around the world who don’t have access, it might be Mark Zuckerberg‘s passion project (and the promo clip is quite stately thanks to JFK).

But Matt Buchanan of The New Yorker, among many others, isn’t so sure about Internet.org’s goals. What’s the problem? Well, the project was founded by FacebookEricsson, MediaTek, Nokia, Opera, Qualcomm, and Samsung—seven companies that would love to get those 4-5 billion wired up so they can provide them with related services (and promo messages). Buchanan takes issue with the fact that Facebook stands to gain millions, if not billions, of new users without actually doing any of the infrastructural legwork required to make the plan a reality. It’s hard to believe, but many of the areas targeted by Internet.org don’t have any electricity, much less 4G service.

This is why Zuckerberg’s Wired interview, published yesterday, reads something like the first stop on a damage control tour.

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What Are America’s 10 ‘Most Hated’ Brands? And Why?

Lord VoldemortToday we came across a list of “America’s 10 Most Hated Companies” courtesy of Ragan’s PR Daily and 24/7 Wall Street, which compiled the worst of the worst based on “stock performance, employee and customer satisfaction, and management decisions.”

We were intrigued, so we figured we’d peruse the list and see what we could make of it. What are these brands, and what did they do to offend the American public (and their investors) so badly?

Here they are, along with our past and present theories on why they suck:

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Roll Call: Shift, Clear Channel Outdoor Americas, APCO Worldwide, and More

Adam Gerston, one of the leaders of Facebook’s Preferred Marketing Developers program, left the social network to join Shift as vice president of strategic partnerships. Gerston, who joined Facebook in 2010, told Business Insider that, during his time at the company, the Preferred Marketing Developers grew from a group of two to a team of 20 managers who handle 25 percent of the company’s ad clients. (AllFacebook)

Clear Channel Outdoor Holdings, Inc. announced the appointment of Vicki Lins as executive vice president and chief marketing officer for Clear Channel Outdoor Americas (CCOA). She had been SVP of marketing at Comcast. An ad industry veteran with more than twenty years’ experience, Lins will lead marketing strategy and execution for the CCOA business and will also serve as a member of the CCOA Executive Committee which guides the overall corporate strategy in North America. She will also liaise with Clear Channel Outdoor’s global marketing organization. (Release)

Frances Sun, former senior vice president at Hill+Knowlton Strategies, China, joins APCO Worldwide as managing director of the firm’s Shanghai office. Sun has more than 20 years of experience in global communication, crisis communication, and media and government relations. Prior to joining APCO, Frances spearheaded H+K Strategies’ practice aimed to equip Chinese companies with professional communication support for their globalization efforts. She served as the global client relationship manager for the Beijing Olympic Games and led H+K’s crisis and issues management practice. She has extensive experience conducting media and crisis communication trainings for executives from both multinational and Chinese companies. (Release)

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The PR Pitfalls of ‘Brand Ambassadors’

Today our friends at the SpinSucks blog highlight an example of an unfortunate PR mix-up on the part of a massive international corporation—shocking, we know.

Tech bloggers and tech manufacturers have long maintained “I’ll scratch your back”-style relationships. On that note, Samsung recently started a program called “Mob!lers” to recruit new “brand ambassadors”, enticing tech writers to cover their company by way of paid trips and other freebies.

Like every other company on the planet, Samsung is very interested in the fast-growing India market, so they invited several tech bloggers from the subcontinent to cover the IFA consumer electronics conference in Berlin in exchange for free phones and travel expenses.

The problem: there was some confusion over the particulars. Read more

Mobile Industry Responds to WHO Cancer Warning

News that the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) found a possible link between mobile phones and cancer has caused quite the media uproar. In response, mobile businesses and organizations have highlighted the previous research on the subject and the inconclusive nature of all of the findings.

In a statement, CTIA – The Wireless Association released a statement saying, in part:

IARC conducts numerous reviews and in the past has given the same score to, for example, pickled vegetables and coffee. This IARC classification does not mean cellphones cause cancer…

The IARC working group did not conduct any new research, but rather reviewed published studies. Based on previous assessments of the scientific evidence, the Federal Communications Commission has concluded that ‘[t]here’s no scientific evidence that proves that wireless phone usage can lead to cancer.’ The Food and Drug Administration has also stated that ‘[t]he weight of scientific evidence has not linked cellphones with any health problems.

Individual mobile businesses have also responded.

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Nokia Chooses Next Fifteen

After much review and a lot of changes, Nokia has settled on Next Fifteen (The Holmes Report says Bite Communications and Text 100 are among the firms that will be working on the business) for PR work across the U.S., U.K., and Finland where the company is headquartered.

The decision was made after a six-month search that had narrowed the contenders down to three companies in addition to Next Fifteen: Emanate, Fleishman-Hillard, and Cohn & Wolfe. F-H and Cohn & Wolfe (which works with LG Mobile) ran into conflicts.

Ketchum previously handled Nokia’s PR in the U.S. GolinHarris was the previous AOR with Good Relations handling the business in the U.K. [via Holmes Report]

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Ogilvy Adds Two SVPs to its Corporate Practice

Michelle Press and Drew Ferguson have joined Ogilvy PR‘s corporate practice in Chicago as SVPs. Press will lead the b-to-b and corporate technology groups. She joins from GolinHarris where she was SVP of programming and client relationships in areas including b-to-b marketing and corporate reputation.

Ferguson will work with C-level comms and reputation initiatives. He was previously at Ketchum where he handled crisis and issues management for Thornburg Mortgage and handled strategy for Nokia, United Airlines, and other clients.

Ogilvy has announced a number of staff changes in the past few months, including the addition of Jennifer Risi and Alyssa Garnick.

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