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Under the Umbrian Sun: How To Enjoy the International Journalism Fest From Afar

ijf14If you aren’t a little jealous of everyone in Perugia at the International Journalism Festival, you must be somewhere really nice. What’s better than an international program of speakers, talking about actually practicing journalism, in Umbria? If you’re there, just try not to brag.

Time to mute all the #ijf14 tweets before I am sick with envy

— Jacob Harris (@harrisj) April 30, 2014

But actually, please, do tweet. Though I’ve ranted about following Twitter chats, I have no qualms about hashtags. The festival is happening in Italy, so if you’re on the east coast, perusing #ijf14 tweets is a perfect way to spend your commute and be inspired. If you’re on the west coast, or anywhere in between, I’m sorry to say you’ll have to adjust for the time difference yourself. The festival organizers have also compiled a Twitter list of all the speakers, so waste some time seeing who you’re missing out on and follow them.

I spent a lot of time in Italy, so I’m well prepared to read things in Italian and appreciate how Italian journalists operate. It’s almost a political, or at least activist, act. Which is why I’m surprised that they’re letting TIM, the Italian Comcast, handle the livestream. Chissa perche (insert handgesture here). With time differences and poor prompts, it’s confusing and difficult to find a schedule. You can give it a go here. Or just head to the festival’s homepage by late afternoon each day to watch the panels. It’s much more efficient, in my humble, cable-company-hating opinion.

Any panel you’re looking forward to hearing? Want to buy me a ticket for next year? Let me know in the comments or @10,000Words.

Join Us Tomorrow for Our First ‘Career Lunch’ Google+ Hangout!

mediabistro career lunchWe’re excited to announce Mediabistro is launching a new Google+ Hangout series tomorrow called Career Lunch to help our ever-growing community stay ahead of the job curve. We’ll be talking to a wide variety of media pros, all of whom are from our talented pool of MediabistroEDU instructors. Our first Career Lunch will begin tomorrow at 1 p.m. ET.

Join our MediaJobsDaily editor Vicki Salemi and Mediabistro’s managing editor Valerie Berrios as they talk to Maurice Cherry, creative principal at 3eighteen media, a design and consulting firm.

We’ll find out how you can leverage web design along with social media and digital strategies in order to catapult your career to the next level.

Join the conversation with your questions and comments on Twitter, Facebook or Google+ with the hashtag #mbhangouts.

Watch the 15th International Symposium on Online Journalism Live

2014isojdateThere are few occasions when the world’s greatest minds in journalism gather to discuss, brainstorm and learn with and from each other, and the annual International Symposium on Online Journalism (ISOJ) is certainly one of those occasions.

The 15th iteration of the meeting is this upcoming weekend, April 4-5 at the University of Texas-Austin’s Blanton Museum of Art, and the ISOJ schedule promises some great information and top speakers from all over the world including media execs, writers and academics.

But don’t worry if you can’t make it to the Lone Star State for ISOJ (some of you just returned from SXSW 2014, right?). You can tune in to the event’s livestream here on Friday and Saturday, where the ISOJ will be broadcast in English and Spanish. Read more

SXSWi 2014: Glenn Greenwald on Social Media, Surveillance and the Purpose of Journalism

greenwald-sxswSXSW attendees packed into an Austin Convention Center exhibit hall earlier this week to hear from a guest who wasn’t even in town — editor and journalist with First Look Media’s The Intercept, Glenn Greenwald.

Widely known as an associate of Edward Snowden, a former government employee who leaked hundreds of documents on the NSA’s surveillance program, Greenwald was invited to discuss his work and the future of democratic journalism via Skype. In his virtual conversation with Personal Democracy Media editorial director Micah Sifry, Greenwald was his usual unabashed, passionate self expressing his thoughts on the power of social media, government surveillance initiatives, constitutional rights and his role as a journalist:

On social:

For a man who is busy trying to expose what he believes are great injustices to the American public by reporting from all over the world, Greenwald is a pretty active Twitter user. And as the former Guardian writer said Monday, he’s a fan of the platform. “I actually do think it’s a really good medium.” Referring to social as the “biggest difference between today’s online journalism and establishment journalism,” he said its best benefit is that the availability of reader feedback it provides “keeps you honest.”

“I do think online interaction, unpleasant and annoying as it may be, is a really important form of accountability,” Greenwald said. In the old days, legacy media reporters and columnists “were completely insular people who spoke to the world in monologue form … to passive readers. Now, if you are a journalist, you’re going to constantly hear from people … who have a lot of important things to say.”

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SXSWi Day 3: Journalism Can Make For Great Business, Says The Atlantic‘s Scott Havens

IAP22928The “future of journalism” topic has almost become trite in journalism circles, but for The Atlantic‘s President M. Scott Havens, thoughtful discussions and observations on the media landscape, both present and future, make the difference between being in the red and black.

At his SXSW talk, “Can Great Journalism Make for Great Business?” Havens, who will begin his post as Senior Vice President, Digital at Time Inc. March 31, explained how he helped propel a struggling then-Atlantic Monthly back to relevancy and progressiveness in the biz. A few of his “core beliefs” on producing and financially sustaining digital journalism are:

Magazines are here to stay

Sure, the definition of magazines is increasingly open for interpretation, but Havens says they’re not going anywhere. Readers are seeking stories with depth, analysis and craft, unlike so much of the content that permeates the web. “There’s something special about a well-researched magazine article,” he said. It’s fair to assume that print magazines won’t last (other than giants like TIME, Harper’s, The New Yorker, etc.) unless publishers can keep making profits from them. In The Atlantic’s experience, “Print advertising is actually sorta stable,” he said.

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