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Mediabistro

Pen Thousands of Words on Poets & Writers

When your writing spans more than 1,000 words, the number of publications you can pitch seems to dwindle, but Poets & Writer is seeking reflective essays and publishing industry trend pieces that reach up to 3,000 words.

With 80 percent of its editorial content generated by freelancers, the literary magazine deems itself ”writer-friendly” — with plenty of room for outside pitches. The “News & Trends” section brings up-to-date happenings of the publishing and literary community, “Literary Life” offers a home for long-form reflections on the writing process, and P&W is also  open to profiles of writers and poets whose books are about to be published.

Looking to break in? Get more guidelines in  How To Pitch: Poets & Writers.

Highlight Music for Village Voice

It’s almost the weekend, and you’ve been invited to your roommate’s band’s show tonight. If the cheap beer isn’t a good enough incentive, maybe a byline at the Village Voice is.

As the most open section of the Voice, the music section is vibing for offbeat culture stories with a humorous yet hard-hitting tone. Music editor Maura Johnston wants to know what is happening around New York: an artist with an interesting backstory and NYC ties who’s releasing an album, a micro-scene coalescing, and so on.

For more on word count and editor contact info, check out How To Pitch: Village Voice.

Writers Wanted at Bloomberg Businessweek (No MBAs Required)

You’re not the only one intimidated by the Bloomberg Businessweek name. In mediabistro.com’s latest How To Pitch article, editors admit that, despite the brand’s cachet, they aren’t inundated with freelance pitches — good news if you’re looking to land a byline there.

“Ultimately we want someone to spin a really great yarn that happens to be of interest to business readers,” explained features editor Sheelah Kolhatkar.

To find out which sections of Bloomberg Businessweek are the most freelancer-friendly and for a list of all editors accepting pitches, check out How To Pitch: Bloomberg Businessweek.

Tap Into Your Southern Roots for South

If you’ve got a place in your heart for Southern traditions (hold the fried chicken stereotypes, please), you could land a byline in South.

This Savannah, Georgia-based pub concentrates on highlighting remarkable Southerners and any brand new establishments and trends happening in the Creative Coast. (Think that Southern belle who made it big, or that hip, new designer from Nashville who’s got the fashion world buzzing.)

“The pub has an entire section dedicated to profiles on interesting Southern characters which definitely lends itself to outside ideas,” said managing editor Lauren Hunsberger. ”The characters, events, culture and stories are second to none and provide for some of the best reading in the world.”

For more on word count and which sections are open to freelancers, read How To Pitch: South.

Make The Band Of Writers at Filter

Sometimes pitching feels like auditioning for a seat in the high school cafeteria. Only the popular kids get the good bylines, right?

Not true at Filter. These  editors say all you have to do to break in is love good music and introduce yourself through email. Yep, that’s it.

“Be creative and show us who you are,” said  Pat McGuire, the editor-in-chief. “You have to understand that there are so many people seeking similar positions that you have to make yourself stand out a little bit.”

McGuire added one piece of advice on getting your foot in Filter‘s door. “I have a sense of humor; everybody at Filter does. So entertain us. Make us remember you — without being unprofessional.”

To find out what to do once you have McGuire’s attention, check out How To Pitch: Filter.

 

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