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Posts Tagged ‘instagram’

The Hottest Social Network These Days? Not Facebook — But It’s Owned By Them

Facebook remains the undisputed king of social networks. If you’re sharing your stories or looking for sources, your time is well spent there.

But if you want to keep up and catch up with your audience, you can’t be only there, especially as the web moves to an ever more-visually driven medium. (And no, “But I’m on Twitter, too” isn’t enough these days.)

A study out this month finds that the clear winner in growth is another Facebook-acquired property is gaining on its photo-sharing corporate cousin: Instagram. According to research firm GlobalWebIndex, whose quarterly social summary (for Q4 2013) released this month pegs Instagram as the fastest growing — by a long shot — social network.

According to their survey, Instagram grew a whopping 23% in active usage in the fourth quarter of 2013. That same period saw a 3% decrease in Facebook’s usage, as well as in YouTube. To be fair, Facebook is still the most trafficked network, and with far more users already signed on it has less room to grow, but other budding social networks are gaining on it. Read more

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How Instagram Ads Could Affect Journalists

Allegedly, all good things must come to an end — so, use of the photo filtering and social network Instagram without advertisements (a very good thing, in my opinion) — will soon end.

Now that we know (even more definitively) that Instagram is on the verge of filling our news feeds with unwanted sponsored photos/posts, I wonder — will journalists take to the app any less to congregate around eyewitness photos of newsworthy events?

Instagram has always intended to be an actively monetizing platform, so this shouldn’t come as a big shock. The question is, even with a whopping 150 million confirmed Instagram users, can the app afford to lose people? And if they do lose those of who might decide to filter and share our photos someplace where our user experience is not disrupted by posts from car dealerships and retail shops, where will we go instead?

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How New Instagram Changes Your Journalism

Instagram has become an unlikely, yet important, online tool for journalists, bloggers and citizens. Not only is it a great way to shoot stylized photos and on-the-go location shots, but it’s also a smart outlet to turn to when looking for eyewitness accounts of major news — people often turn to Instagram thanks to its quick sharing with social media networks like Twitter and Facebook.

However, these past few weeks have changed the service in a radical way, and now is the time to determine whether it’s the right tool for your photos and your personal use.

1. You Won’t See it On Twitter

This season has been a rocky one for Instagram and one of its biggest propagators, Twitter. Two weeks ago, the companies had effectively “broken up,” with Instagram no longer hosting images through Twitter’s API. Twitter snapped back, effectively distributing its own Instagram clone (with filters to boot) right in its native TwitPic system. Read more

Instagram, Like Other Social Media, a ‘Police Scanner’ for a Demographic

Instagrammed screenshot of a picture of SnapRecognizing a new tool at The Boston Globe is a gateway to worthwhile discussion on social media strategy: not everyone likes, has access to or uses the same digital thing. And that’s great for journalism.

Journalism.co.uk has a nice read on the wall-o-local-Instagram pics that the Globe is test-driving in its newsroom. Appropriately named “Snap,” the project is a result of a partnership with the MIT Media Lab, and it displays every local Instagram image on a big map of the area. Neat on its own (i.e., worthy of an Instagrammed pic of its own), and notably, it’s also being used for helping find sources for local stories.

There’s definite newsroom utility to display social media data like this on a map. You naturally are exposed to events, with pictorial evidence, that you may not have otherwise paid attention towards. And you can can pinpoint where that action is happening. That’s practical on a day-to-day basis, and particularly helpful during event like Hurricane Sandy, where much is going on and you’re looking to move your reporting fast. It’s clearly a useful tool (and if it isn’t yet clear, I’d certainty love to play with it.)

What I think is worth noting beyond the obvious ingenuity, however, was the main story that according to the article Chris Marstall, creative technologist at the Boston Globe, actually produced during Hurricane Sandy. After spending “about eight hours staring at Snap” during the storm, this piece says that Marstall didn’t know what story to pick up and write. “Eventually I figured out that the interesting story to tell was that everybody was staying home and getting drunk in their apartments, doing a lot of day drinking,” he said.

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Why Instagram’s Web Profiles Could Benefit News Organizations

Earlier this week, Instagram announced that it would be bringing its profile pages to the Web. Currently, Instagram has been a mobile-only entity, where users could upload images only through their mobile devices and browse friends’ and brands’ pages only through mobile devices.

Now, this is going to change, according to an Instagram blog post announcing the move:

“Your web profile features a selection of your recently shared photographs just above your profile photo and bio, giving others a snapshot of the photos you share on Instagram. In addition, you can follow users, comment & like photos and edit your profile easily and directly from the web.”

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