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Posts Tagged ‘magazines’

Your App is a “Walkie-Talkie” and You Need to Start Using It Like One

docwalkietalkieAs news publishers talk about ‘unbolting’ their digital enterprises and newsrooms work on being more mobile in the name of more engaged with their audiences, it’s hard to imagine what that eventually looks like. To start, it might be helpful not to change our actual news products but focus on new ways of using what we have.

Investing in baby steps, if you will.

That’s what the guys behind the software seem to think anyway. Mag+ is the ‘content publishing ecosystem’ and software behind many of the newspaper and magazine apps you might read — New York Magazine, The Atlantic Weekly, Bloomberg Markets, Chicago Sun-Times, Popular Science, and The Next Web to name a few.

They’ve also just released an upgrade to their software that mirrors some general trends in news publishing. Mike Haney, co-founder and creative director for Mag+, says that the upgrade focused on redesigning the storefront and better sorting, so users know what they have when they want it. They’ve also partnered with eMagazine Insight, so publishers can track the effectiveness of in-app links and banners and hone their marketing campaigns. Most interesting for a mobile newsroom is the take on push notifications and alert channels. Another partner, Appboy, brings custom segemented messaging to Mag+ apps. From their release:

In addition to issues, the app can deliver custom push notifications, promotions, cross app promotions, in-app notifications and news feed items that can be specifically targeted to users based on what they’ve done in the app. Combined with a built-in feedback tool, these features make the platform a more effective communications tool and opens it for a broader range of uses.

It’s just one step in looking at the app as a multi-channeled tool to build better engagement with readers. Haney explains:

We talk about being a content hub. Its not about just designing your issue and pushing it out, but it’s about creating a relationship with your consumer. It’s like a walkie-talkie — you have one in your pocket and they have the other one, and you have the ability to reach out and talk to them and give them control about what they get from you. Read more

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Why Are Digital News Orgs Getting Into Print?

print magazinesIn a strange twist of events, popular digital news publishing orgs are starting to put out print magazines as an attempt to earn a revenue and increase brand awareness.

No, it’s not an Onion-type hoax. It’s a true story. Capital New York, a leading political and media news blog, was bought by Politico this fall, and the magazine is the first of many steps to increase — well, I don’t really know what.

According to AdAge, it’s part of Capital’s expansion after being bought by Politico. When you think Washington D.C. news, you think Politico. And they want you to think of Capital when you think of New York. Politico itself announced that it would publish a glossy six times a year and popular music site Pitchfork publishes a quarterly Pitchfork Review, available by subscription or for around $20 per issue.

A quarterly for a music website makes sense in terms of brand and scaling their product. Sort of like McSweeney’s. But Capital will print monthly, with current editors overseeing the content. The first run will have, again according to AdAge:

… a run of about 8,000 copies, the company said, with plans to distribute about 6,000 copies in Manhattan and 2,000 in Albany. Copies will be delivered to the state capitol building in Albany, City Hall in Manhattan and key individuals in the industries Capital New York covers, according to Roy Schwartz, chief revenue officer at Capital New York and Politico.

The magazine will be free, Mr. Schwartz added, with subscriptions available upon request to those who “qualify” based on their job title, job responsibilities, or other criteria.

Doesn’t it just sound like a very labor intensive marketing campaign?

I guess that’s why “digital first” is how we refer to pubs and not digital only. But I’d to find out how effective rags like this can really be in terms of brand engagement and advertising revenue.

Can it be worth the trouble or is this about leftover, hopeful thinking, that a print version will ever make a difference? Tweet your thoughts @10,000Words or share in the comments. 

As POLITICO Branches Out in Print, Harper’s Enters the Mobile World

politico_01In a somewhat counterintuitive twist, POLITICO, which has budded into an authority on Washington-based politics since its digital inception in 2007, has launched a print magazine.

And in contrast, a much older high culture, arts and trends magazine (the second-oldest continuously published magazine in the U.S.) — Harper’s Magazine — has finally entered the mobile arena with an iOS app.

POLITICO Magazine isn’t the organization’s first dabbling into print — it publishes a decent-sized daily newspaper on Capitol Hill happenings (but that can also be read online). Still, the mag, which will be published six times a year, promises to fulfill a different need.

Editor Susan B. Glasser cites a need for contextual, deeply-reported stories as the organization’s reasoning for incurring the cost and time necessary to produce a print product.

Read more

Boston Review Launches New Site

The Boston Review launched their new website today, and whether you’re a dedicated reader or not, it’s worth a peek.

The magazine has always seen good design as a way to engage to readers. In 2010, they switched from a black and white tabloid to a glossy, full color mag. In print, they wanted it to be beautiful and permanent, according to marketing director Daniel Pritchard, “something our readers could keep on the shelf.”

On the web, “the goal is to engage new readers, so we wanted it to be easily accessible and easier to navigate, expressing the same aesthetic but thinking about the structure very differently,” Pritchard told me in an email. I think those goals are reflected in the new design.

Some features:

Read more

Land Up to $2 Per Word at Bicycling

Bicycling, the world’s largest cycling magazine, is looking for writers who can cover the hobby from new and fresh perspectives. “There has to be a bigger story besides the fact that you rode someplace cool,” said senior editor Emily Furia.

Bicycling tries to appeal to the biking community as whole, as opposed to other cycling publications that focus on specific subcultures. And, with half of the content in the mag provided by freelancers, these editors are more than willing to take on new scribes who lack experience or whose ideas need polishing. “In the case of freelance pitches, we will typically work with the writer to refine the story angle and format,” said Furia.

Get all the details and editors’ contact info in How To Pitch: Bicycling.

Nicholas Braun

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